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Old 06-04-2010, 09:54 AM   #14431
ducnut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinez
I need an entry level road bike and Craigslist is driving me nuts with all the option out there.

Specialized Roubaix 5ish years old for $700
Specialized Roubaix 4ish years old with a claimed 100 miles on it for $950 price negotiable
Trek Composite 2100 year "not sure" and "8.5 to 9 on a 10 scale for condition" for $500
FELT z70 ~1 year old for $750

I'm going to look at these tomorrow but I'd like some input from the smart kids who know more about this stuff than I do.

I guess I should add that I'd like to do longish rides and that comfort is certainly a consideration and that this is a test to see if I like road riding as much as I like mountain biking. If I do I'll most likely get a better bike when the time is right.

Thanks.
Hard to beat a Roubaix. My question is which models are they? There are different model levels within the Roubaix family. No matter, they're full carbon, ride really nice, and have stable handling.

I don't see a Z70 listed on Felt's site. And, no archive provision. Anyway, the "Z" series is more of a longer distance bike, like the Roubaix, in their lineup. Is the Z70 full carbon? If not, I'd definitely go with the Specialized options.

The Trek is at least an '07, or older. They're, typically, carbon fork, seatstays, and seat post. In this case, I'm still going with a Roubaix.

If all the bikes are within close driving distance, take them for a spin. Even though bikes might be aimed at the same task, they'll all feel different. I've ridden a Roubaix, along with many other varieties, and can't fault any aspect of that bike for your needs. It's not a ride you'll outgrow.
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Old 06-04-2010, 11:05 AM   #14432
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut
Hard to beat a Roubaix. My question is which models are they? There are different model levels within the Roubaix family. No matter, they're full carbon, ride really nice, and have stable handling.

I don't see a Z70 listed on Felt's site. And, no archive provision. Anyway, the "Z" series is more of a longer distance bike, like the Roubaix, in their lineup. Is the Z70 full carbon? If not, I'd definitely go with the Specialized options.

The Trek is at least an '07, or older. They're, typically, carbon fork, seatstays, and seat post. In this case, I'm still going with a Roubaix.

If all the bikes are within close driving distance, take them for a spin. Even though bikes might be aimed at the same task, they'll all feel different. I've ridden a Roubaix, along with many other varieties, and can't fault any aspect of that bike for your needs. It's not a ride you'll outgrow.
Thanks again.

The $700 Roubiax appears to be the triple.
The $950 Roubiax is an Elite triple.

The Trek is interesting because of the price and the relative lack of use.

The Felt z70 is Here

I've only sat on the Roubiax (Didn't ask the LBS to test ride it because I wasn't buying new yet.) and I liked that I felt a bit more upright than I did on the same level Trek. (I don't remember the model)

I'm focused on the $950 Roubiax but I'm still looking at all four tomorrow.

One thing I've noticed at the price point I'm looking at is that most of them have shitty wheels.
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Old 06-04-2010, 12:51 PM   #14433
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinez
One thing I've noticed at the price point I'm looking at is that most of them have shitty wheels.
^^^ Don't let that bother you. Just run 'em into the ground.

I think most mfrs figure the serious cyclist will have their own wheels. So, they put the money into other parts of the bike. It's like a pie-chart; splitting costs into different areas.
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Old 06-04-2010, 01:20 PM   #14434
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I'm no road bike expert, but I love my Roubaix. When I got mine last Fall I was looking for something that would help me get more pleasure out of the road riding that I do to get out and keep fit when I can't mountain bike. It did that, and then some -- road riding doesn't feel like a "consolation prize" any more. It's a seriously great machine for cranking out long miles, and it's fine for a quick 1-2 hour blast, as well. My dirt-to-pavement ratio has probably gone from about 5:1 to 2:1 since I got this bike.

I'm pretty sure that it's only starting in 2009 that all the Roubaix models have been full carbon. Before that, they had both aluminum and carbon bikes under the Roubaix name. So a 4 or 5 year old Roubaix may be an aluminum bike. But that's no reason to reject it, particularly if you're looking more for a 'try out road riding' bike rather than one you're hoping to live with for many years.
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Old 06-04-2010, 01:47 PM   #14435
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Numb hands is called "cyclist palsy"

The gel gloves can also be a big help here. Also they make gel handlebar tape.

The brooks saddles are the corbins of the bike world. Except Brooks has been making saddles forever. Selle Antomica is another Brooks type saddle that has been modified. Racers don't favor the Brooks saddles cause they tend to be heavy and they're not forgiving in the rain. Long distance people tend to love the Brooks saddles. The B17 is the classic. You'll need help figuring out if your a narrow or wide. Brooks saddles need an extensive break-in period. They're made of leather.
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:18 PM   #14436
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
The brooks saddles are the corbins of the bike world. Except Brooks has been making saddles forever. Selle Antomica is another Brooks type saddle that has been modified. Racers don't favor the Brooks saddles cause they tend to be heavy and they're not forgiving in the rain. Long distance people tend to love the Brooks saddles. The B17 is the classic. You'll need help figuring out if your a narrow or wide. Brooks saddles need an extensive break-in period. They're made of leather.

I'll take a Specialized "Body Geometry" saddle or similar over a Brooks any day.

I rode on Brooks Pro leather saddles in the early-mid 70s, and have ZERO desire to go back to those things, they only have poseur value now, and belong on one of those fixie cafe bikes that gets ridden a few blocks to be parked in front of the espresso stand, or on a fully restored cherry 60s/70s euro bike that came with them originally, and then only for authenticity... They not only require extensive break-in, you also need to wax them frequently, and god save you if they get wet.

For touring (eg, non-race), I'd probably go with the Specialized Milano (I have an older Milano on my cruiser in fact, but my cruiser is somewhat more forward sitting than most and has a riding position more like a mountain bike in many respects). For a more hard core roadie bike, maybe the Avatar or similar, I dunno. wow, they've gotten expensive at the high end Selle and Fizik Vitesse are good high end roadie saddles, too.

The springer saddle on that Schwinn is, as Gummee(?) pointed out, pre-hammocked. when you sit on it, and the springs go down, there is going to be a big dip in the middle, so the front will be 'up', putting pressure on your junk.
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:36 PM   #14437
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oznerol
I'm no road bike expert, but I love my Roubaix. When I got mine last Fall I was looking for something that would help me get more pleasure out of the road riding that I do to get out and keep fit when I can't mountain bike. It did that, and then some -- road riding doesn't feel like a "consolation prize" any more. It's a seriously great machine for cranking out long miles, and it's fine for a quick 1-2 hour blast, as well. My dirt-to-pavement ratio has probably gone from about 5:1 to 2:1 since I got this bike.

I'm pretty sure that it's only starting in 2009 that all the Roubaix models have been full carbon. Before that, they had both aluminum and carbon bikes under the Roubaix name. So a 4 or 5 year old Roubaix may be an aluminum bike. But that's no reason to reject it, particularly if you're looking more for a 'try out road riding' bike rather than one you're hoping to live with for many years.
Thanks!

My wife had some good points today.

To paraphrase:
"When have you ever not liked a toy you've bought?
"What's the last toy you sold?"
"How many time have you bought used and regretted it?"
"Go buy the new one because you know you'll use it"

She's got my cheap ass rethinking the idea.

IF I buy new it'll be a Roubaix.

PS I was just sent THIS link about the older Roubiax Elite Triple.
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:45 PM   #14438
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
I rode on Brooks Pro leather saddles in the early-mid 70s, and have ZERO desire to go back to those things, they only have poseur value now, and belong on one of those fixie cafe bikes that gets ridden a few blocks to be parked in front of the espresso stand, or on a fully restored cherry 60s/70s euro bike that came with them originally, and then only for authenticity... They not only require extensive break-in, you also need to wax them frequently, and god save you if they get wet.
LOL, I know a couple of randonneurs that ride Brooks saddles. They'll get a laugh that an asshole on a motorcycle forum considers them "poseurs".
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:48 PM   #14439
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
Numb hands is called "cyclist palsy"

The gel gloves can also be a big help here. Also they make gel handlebar tape.

The brooks saddles are the corbins of the bike world. Except Brooks has been making saddles forever. Selle Antomica is another Brooks type saddle that has been modified. Racers don't favor the Brooks saddles cause they tend to be heavy and they're not forgiving in the rain. Long distance people tend to love the Brooks saddles. The B17 is the classic. You'll need help figuring out if your a narrow or wide. Brooks saddles need an extensive break-in period. They're made of leather.
Once again, Advrider brings the goods. Heck, I've been searching Bike forums for a long time on this topic, and all I've ever gotten is "your bike doesn't fit," and "strengthen your core muscles."
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:49 PM   #14440
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My legs weren't as straight as I thought so I raised the seat about 1.5".

Also tilted the seat a little more forward and slapped on an $8 headlight for good measure.
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Old 06-04-2010, 02:57 PM   #14441
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My "pre-softened" Brooks professional on my Bianchi hybrid didn't take any time to break in. It's a nice saddle on a classic lugged steel frame. It rocks.
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Old 06-04-2010, 03:23 PM   #14442
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
Numb hands is called "cyclist palsy"

The gel gloves can also be a big help here. Also they make gel handlebar tape.
You could also try ESI grips. A very good shock absorbing material. Now granted, I use the Chunky mtb grips - but more to fill my XXL hands than for extra cushion. 5 Colors. Maintain "tack" even when wet. Don't move around.

Road version ( a bit pricey) :
http://www.esigrips.com/Silicone_Road_Grips.htm


Engineered
Engineered one side thicker for absorbing shock and vibration with the opposite side thinner for bulk-reducing comfort, combined with the best materials and the best production process this creates max shock absorption and grip, while maintaining the lowest weight possible and highest level of durability.
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Old 06-04-2010, 04:06 PM   #14443
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
My legs weren't as straight as I thought so I raised the seat about 1.5".

Also tilted the seat a little more forward and slapped on an $8 headlight for good measure.
1.5 inches is a hugh move. Many pros (Lance Armstrong according to legend) can tell if his saddle is out of alignment by mili-meters. Too high of a saddle can cause you to rock side to side on your saddle and thats not good either. They say you want about 10 degree bend in your leg on extension. Who "they" are and how you measure that is unknown to me.

IHMO, your $8 would have been better spent on a water bottle holder and a bottle.

If your hands are still bothering you after you use the gloves, grips or tape, they raising your handle bars a little.

You are wearing a helmet aren't you?

Nix the tape idea, you can't use it on your bars. Try the grip cushions suggested above.
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Old 06-04-2010, 04:34 PM   #14444
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
1.5 inches is a hugh move. Many pros (Lance Armstrong according to legend) can tell if his saddle is out of alignment by mili-meters. Too high of a saddle can cause you to rock side to side on your saddle and thats not good either. They say you want about 10 degree bend in your leg on extension. Who "they" are and how you measure that is unknown to me.

IHMO, your $8 would have been better spent on a water bottle holder and a bottle.

If your hands are still bothering you after you use the gloves, grips or tape, they raising your handle bars a little.

You are wearing a helmet aren't you?

Nix the tape idea, you can't use it on your bars. Try the grip cushions suggested above.
I already have a bottle and holder.

They did have gel grip gloves, but I was spending too much already, so I'll get them next time.

Even with the 1.5" rise my legs aren't completely extended.

90% of our riding is done at night and long stretches of the bike trails have no lighting what so ever.

I haven found a helmet I like in my size yet, pretty much everything around here besides the LBS sells helmets almost exclusively in kid sizes.
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Old 06-04-2010, 05:10 PM   #14445
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For riding on the street, you want the saddle to be on the high side- you should be able to pedal smoothly without fully extending your leg, and without rocking your hips back and forth. The highest point that you can still do this is probably darn close to the right saddle position. And yes, it makes a big enough difference that adjustments of 1/8" to 1/4" are the norm.
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