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Old 06-05-2010, 02:04 PM   #14491
Blur
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ZODIAC SCORES!!!!!!!

Lugged steel frame.... AWESOME!
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Old 06-05-2010, 02:05 PM   #14492
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zodiac
What a score! I love the old stuff.
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Old 06-05-2010, 02:26 PM   #14493
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zodiac
that looks like it says 27" ?!? thats implies to me that bike might be a 70s, not 80s bike. the rims do look alloy (many 27" wheel '10-speeds' had chrome steel rims). suntour makes it likely to be a late 70s.

what model # Trek is it? oooh, found this http://www.vintage-trek.com/SerialNumbers.htm (and the rest of that site)

early treks were frames only, they didn't sell complete bikes til a few years later. on the early bikes, the reynolds frames were midrange, the high end frames were columbus+campi
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Old 06-05-2010, 02:31 PM   #14494
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
most compressors won't go much above 80 psi or maybe max 100psi. fine for fat-tire bikes that use 35-65psi. not so fine for 700c roadies that want 120+ PSI.

a good floor pump like I posted will pump up a 700c tire in a few strokes. just remember to -always- go all the way to the bottom, when you're up at 8 times atmospheric pressure (120psi), no air moves at all until the last 1/8th of a stroke.
Ah.

The tank rests around 90psi I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut
Here's a handy chart. This is based on weight per tire. Notice the wider the tire, the less PSI needed.

I think the tires are 26mm.

So probably around 80.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zodiac






Ridden it yet?


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Old 06-05-2010, 03:36 PM   #14495
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Ridden it yet?
I know *I* wouldn't ride that bike 'til I cleaned it up, lubed everything that counted, and replaced the brake cables and shoes (old brake shoes get rock hard and don't work so great). and tires.

If you're hard core, strip off everything you can, and wax the frame with some mild car cleaner/wax after getting the dust and grime off. don't mess with the headset or bottom bracket unless you absolutely have to, as on a really old bike like that, you might find they won't go back together quite right.

then put it back together, and take some more pix for us! I wanna know the frame serial too, so i can look it up on that URL I posted, just cuz I'm curious.
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Old 06-05-2010, 04:44 PM   #14496
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zodiac






Wow, I'd be tempted to clean that up and then turn into a fixie if you wanted that sort of ride. You got a heck of a deal (free) and you saved a good bike from being in the landfill.
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Old 06-05-2010, 06:00 PM   #14497
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
Wow, I'd be tempted to clean that up and then turn into a fixie if you wanted that sort of ride. You got a heck of a deal (free) and you saved a good bike from being in the landfill.
why does everyone want to get rid of their gears?

gears are good. gears help you go fast downhill and climb up steep hills and adjust your cadence to the riding conditions.
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Old 06-05-2010, 06:15 PM   #14498
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
why does everyone want to get rid of their gears?
Well I like gears, but there is a certain simplicity with single speeds or fixies that is appealing unless your planning alot of climbling.

Part of my recommendation for this was that the rear wheel dishing is likely not enough to support a modern 10 speed, getting parts for the old suntour stuff could be pricy, and the frame is likely heavier than a guy might want for some serious riding. Therefore, its often easier to convert a old bike like this into a single speed than it is to update the components or restore the old. Also, the part of the bike that always breaks over time is the shifting systems. Going single solves these problems, saves some money, and still gives you a fun bike for in-town use. Of course, the frame geometry may not favor a fast fun single. Whatever you do, I'd keep the brakes on it.
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Old 06-05-2010, 06:30 PM   #14499
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actually, I've been able to put 6 speed shimano freewheels on several 5-speed freewheel bikes, including one that had a suntour freewheel, and had no problems. I did have to redish one rear wheel slightly to keep the brakes centered, but it was juts a case ot tweaking the spokes. If the old suntour derailleur brakes or wears out (the plastic idler wheels are the main thing that goes on a very high mile bike), replace the derailleur with a midrange shimano acera or something. If you go from 5 to 7 speed, you likely need a new rear wheel and may have to spread the rear stays a few mm.

sadly, if those ARE 27" rims (I don't recall seeing Rigida 27" alloy rims, but stranger things have happened), that hugely reduces your tire choices. If, as I suspect, that bike is mid/late 70s, it may well have tubulars if those aren't 27" rims, I don't remember 700c clinchers coming along much before the early 80s.
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Old 06-05-2010, 07:09 PM   #14500
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hey, any value in a mid 80s Wheelman built 26" front wheel? has Specialized sealed bearing hubs with nuts rather than quickrelease, is the older style wider profile mtn bike rim (Saturae HX32 rim, 36 spoke, 26x1.75, made in japan), heavy gauge stainless spokes with a W on the heads (presumably wheelman?). its stayed very true for decades, and is an extremely strong wheel. It has the good kind of nuts that have a captive toothed washer to clamp the frame. the chrome on the nuts is a little munged. the bearing is very smooth and the axle is as straight as I can tell.

this was the front wheel on my cruiser for a long time. I only retired it because I installed V-brakes according to the book, and forgot that my rim was wider than modern, so they were rather splayed, so I switched out a different front wheel. This Wheelman wheel is about identical to the ones on our old Gen1 Stumpjumpers from circa 1983/84, except those don't have the wheelman stickers... oh, hmmm. the 84 stumpie has araya rims, that don't have stainless rivets around the spoke holes and no stamp on the spokes. the 83 stumpy has a HX28 Saturae rim and DT spokes, but this may have been a replacement wheel, I vaguely remember someone running over my bike in their driveway back in the mid 80s....
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Old 06-05-2010, 07:24 PM   #14501
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
that looks like it says 27" ?!? thats implies to me that bike might be a 70s, not 80s bike. the rims do look alloy (many 27" wheel '10-speeds' had chrome steel rims). suntour makes it likely to be a late 70s.

what model # Trek is it? oooh, found this http://www.vintage-trek.com/SerialNumbers.htm (and the rest of that site)

early treks were frames only, they didn't sell complete bikes til a few years later. on the early bikes, the reynolds frames were midrange, the high end frames were columbus+campi

The tires are 27" 1-1/4 -

I just ripped it down, what a mess, covered in 25 year old grease and dust, glued on.

I took the fork off and completely degreased and tore down the headset, before that it stuck and grinded, now it spins like a watch.

Degreased the whole frame, and took everything off it, except one part/ problem - the BB is shot, and I have every BB tool imaginable, except one to remove this one... I think it's the british style but Japanese.
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Old 06-05-2010, 07:28 PM   #14502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
Wow, I'd be tempted to clean that up and then turn into a fixie if you wanted that sort of ride. You got a heck of a deal (free) and you saved a good bike from being in the landfill.

I've already got a fixie, but it's too nice to lock up outside. I'm in a 4th floor walkup (and it's tight and tough to carry a bike down).



I'm thinking of making this a lock up bike, but single speed instead of fixed. Something I can ride in regular shoes and clothes around town to go food shopping, etc. Leave a basket on it with a Krypto chain.
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Old 06-05-2010, 07:52 PM   #14503
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blur
There's a place online called BikesDirect.com -
Their frames are absolute crap
^^^

I'd gladly ride anything off that site.
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Old 06-05-2010, 07:55 PM   #14504
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
that looks like it says 27" ?!? thats implies to me that bike might be a 70s, not 80s bike. the rims do look alloy (many 27" wheel '10-speeds' had chrome steel rims). suntour makes it likely to be a late 70s.

what model # Trek is it? oooh, found this http://www.vintage-trek.com/SerialNumbers.htm (and the rest of that site)

early treks were frames only, they didn't sell complete bikes til a few years later. on the early bikes, the reynolds frames were midrange, the high end frames were columbus+campi

029433

"Three 950 frames have been reported that contain unlikely year codes of 5, 6 and 7. It is very unlikely they were made in 1975, 76, or 77, more likely (from the brochures) 1980, 81, or 82. Another 950 frame was reported with a 0 in the year code, but was painted as a 1982. From the geometries, they probably were custom frames. Trek apparently used a different coding method for these frames, perhaps so as not to interfere with the production frame serial numbers."

Looks like a 1979 according to the 2nd numeric character.

I couldn't figure it out from that site. Too tired to read it all.
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Zodiac screwed with this post 06-05-2010 at 08:03 PM
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Old 06-05-2010, 08:06 PM   #14505
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut
^^^

I'd gladly ride anything off that site.
That's cool! But it'd be like showing up at your favorite riding spot on a Hyosung motorcycle.

So I hang out with bike snobs..... shoot me.
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