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Old 06-28-2008, 12:24 PM   #6406
DockingPilot
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For future reference:
If any of you ladies ever find the need to remove the rocker cover and cam and or cam chain, and you have any questions on timing, the cam, the chain or the cover itself, ask me. I have the process down pat. I think I could disassemble and assemble it in my sleep now.
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Old 06-28-2008, 02:16 PM   #6407
DockingPilot
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I'm getting a lot pm's and thats fine. But you guys can also feel free to call me at 973-579-7585. Thats probably easier for me to answer questions. Dont worry fellas, it really is elementary. After you familar with it like I am now, you literally have to try and fock it up. But you could I guess if you didnt have your piston right on top when bolting the cam gear back on or had the cam rolled upside down.
Frank
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:39 PM   #6408
MSU Yooper
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CCT thoughts

Not that this topic hasn't already been beat to death, but if the cam chain is expanding as the motor heats, and is then moving to the next click on the tensioner and then when the motorr subsequently cools is under too much tension, would it make sense that if you were to remove it after the motor was cool and immediately re-install, the cct might index to less clicks, so that during start-up when the motor is still cool, the chain wouldn't be too tight and the cct wouldn't move to the next click until the engine was warmed. It appears that it might be the running of the motor when it is still cool and the cct has indexed to the next click on the cct from the previous ride where the stretching of the chain is occurring. I know what some of you are thinking (besides the fact that I'm either an idiot, or that was the longest sentence you've ever read). Removing the cct after every ride would be a pain, but it really doesn't take that long.
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:39 PM   #6409
Countdown
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xfool
Here is my opinion on the auto CCT.
Xfool,

What about expansion of the aluminum cylinder?

What about expansion of any pin bushings which reduces the ID of the holes and shortens the chain?

I would think the Cylinder it is driver in any thermal expansion/contraction!

Your math doesn't pass the giggle test. A steel chain (or steel con rod) won't grow by my more than a few thousanths in 200-300 degrees F which is not multipul clicks of the adjuster.

However your theory is interesting if the cylinder shrinks and the adjuster just does click when cold, how much does the cylinder grow and how much tension does the chain get when the cylinder heats up and moves the cam away from the crank?

Jerry
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:48 PM   #6410
Beemer Pat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spanker
Pat, I had a specific agreement with my dealer that if I purchased the bike, he would get the comp adjusters for me. He followed through on his promise. I told him that I would rather the Factory Connection do the installation and re-valve at my expense. Other than their fine reputation for building championship suspensions, FC's close proximity and 1-2 day turnaround is the primary reason why I'm going with them. I have already had the forks apart (search my posts). You need to fabricate a cylindrical pin spanner to take the tubes apart and get them back together. It's not that big a deal, nor should it be to put the comp adjusters in. Your wizardry with fabrication is well documented here and should pose no probs for you.
Can you give me a part number so I can order them. It looks as if Husky is not willing to step up to the plate.
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Old 06-28-2008, 07:02 PM   #6411
larryboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSU Yooper
Not that this topic hasn't already been beat to death, but if the cam chain is expanding as the motor heats, and is then moving to the next click on the tensioner and then when the motorr subsequently cools is under too much tension, would it make sense that if you were to remove it after the motor was cool and immediately re-install, the cct might index to less clicks, so that during start-up when the motor is still cool, the chain wouldn't be too tight and the cct wouldn't move to the next click until the engine was warmed.
Yes, Hoder proved that earlier.
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Old 06-28-2008, 09:25 PM   #6412
motometal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Countdown
Xfool,

What about expansion of the aluminum cylinder?

What about expansion of any pin bushings which reduces the ID of the holes and shortens the chain?

I would think the Cylinder it is driver in any thermal expansion/contraction!

Your math doesn't pass the giggle test. A steel chain (or steel con rod) won't grow by my more than a few thousanths in 200-300 degrees F which is not multipul clicks of the adjuster.

However your theory is interesting if the cylinder shrinks and the adjuster just does click when cold, how much does the cylinder grow and how much tension does the chain get when the cylinder heats up and moves the cam away from the crank?

Jerry
while aluminum does have a greater CTE than steel, don't forget about the steel cylinder/head studs...which would limit expansion to the amount that they can stretch elastically after they have already been torqued down.


jeeez...next thing you know i'll be contributing to a discussion about steering stabilizers...
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Old 06-28-2008, 10:52 PM   #6413
BigAls
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ride

You guy's really need to get out of the shop and ride!

Even though I am an old man I'd rather "ride than type" anyday.

Has anyone actually experienced a CCT failure? What I'm getting at here are what are the statistics?

I like to work on my TE as much as most, doing oil/filter changes, air filter, chain and sprockets, nuts and bolts, fork oil, suspension setup etc., but that takes up enough time!

If you would rather obsess over a potential failure than ride then go for it (I guess)..
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Old 06-29-2008, 03:11 AM   #6414
spanker
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BeemerPat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemer Pat
Can you give me a part number so I can order them. It looks as if Husky is not willing to step up to the plate.
BP, I don't have them (comp adjusters) yet. Your riding pal in Salida does however. The part number according to Ramz is 717096/R. He is talking to LTRacing to get his forks done. A reminder to all that comp adjusters alone won't fix the fork problem in my view. They will allow adjustment of the RATE at which the forks will compress. I want more; I want the harshness gone, especially square-edged stuff. It's like running into a cement block with these Zokes. The only way to do that is a re-valve/spring change.
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Old 06-29-2008, 06:02 AM   #6415
larryboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motometal

jeeez...next thing you know i'll be contributing to a discussion about steering stabilizers...
Oh, now you've done it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAls
You guy's really need to get out of the shop and ride!

Has anyone actually experienced a CCT failure? What I'm getting at here are what are the statistics?

I like to work on my TE as much as most, doing oil/filter changes, air filter, chain and sprockets, nuts and bolts, fork oil, suspension setup etc., but that takes up enough time!

If you would rather obsess over a potential failure than ride then go for it (I guess)..
Hey Al, we're hoping that a cheap $51 part will stop the cam chain wear. The stock tensioner is fine if you like replacing cam chains. There is a good percentage of us in this thread alone that are seeing worn out cam chains in the 3900-10,000 mile range. Sometimes I go 2-3,000 miles in a week and I'd have to stop and replace my cam chain if we don't get to the bottom of this. A manual CCT seemed to cure the DRZ problems back when and I'm willing to give it a shot.
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Old 06-29-2008, 08:20 AM   #6416
motometal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spanker
BP, I don't have them (comp adjusters) yet. Your riding pal in Salida does however. The part number according to Ramz is 717096/R. He is talking to LTRacing to get his forks done. A reminder to all that comp adjusters alone won't fix the fork problem in my view. They will allow adjustment of the RATE at which the forks will compress. I want more; I want the harshness gone, especially square-edged stuff. It's like running into a cement block with these Zokes. The only way to do that is a re-valve/spring change.
if you haven't already tried it, switch to 2.5 wt. fork oil. You will probably need to compensate by turning the rebound adjuster in a bit. The ligher oil affects everything...low and high speed rebound and compression. Start on the low side for fork oil level, then add 10-20 cc at a time, per leg, through the air bleed screws if you want more bottoming resistance.

If you are not a jumper, then the main situation you are trying to cover for bottoming resistance is "g-outs" such as riding down into a dip or ditch that goes back up quickly.

From what I gather, the fork springs are more suited to an "average" rider weight than the rear shock spring (the rear shock spring is too stiff unless you are a heavier rider and/or ride with a lot of luggage).
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Old 06-29-2008, 10:04 AM   #6417
Flashman1
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I lost the little screw that holds the black wire to the petcock for the fuel sensor. Does anyone know what size it is.
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Old 06-29-2008, 11:21 AM   #6418
motometal
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speaking of that, I would suggest cutting the wires where they go into the petcock flush...clean (remove old epoxy if needed and degrease with brake cleaner), then seal that area up with JB weld. I'm on my 2nd petcock and thought that this one wouldn't leak if I put a strain relief on the wires by zip tying them to the body of the petcock. Well, it leaks again!

So if your petcock isn't leaking now, it's probably just a matter of time. Mine never got real bad, but enough to stink and make a mess. With some experience, your trip odometer is a great fuel gage anyway.
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Old 06-29-2008, 12:09 PM   #6419
Aey dubya
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motometal
speaking of that, I would suggest cutting the wires where they go into the petcock flush...clean (remove old epoxy if needed and degrease with brake cleaner), then seal that area up with JB weld. I'm on my 2nd petcock and thought that this one wouldn't leak if I put a strain relief on the wires by zip tying them to the body of the petcock. Well, it leaks again!

So if your petcock isn't leaking now, it's probably just a matter of time. Mine never got real bad, but enough to stink and make a mess. With some experience, your trip odometer is a great fuel gage anyway.
9500 mi and two pet cocks, I smashed the 1st one. and neither ever leaked. Knock on wood. As for the wire I broke one of them and just got a heavier wire end and used the screw on the front to mount it gauge still worked fine.
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Old 06-29-2008, 12:24 PM   #6420
Flashman1
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I already did the JB weld fix and have no leak - but I need thar tine screw to reattach the black wire.
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