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Old 01-17-2009, 06:38 AM   #9046
Flashman1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzcoinc
The chain in a DR does not last longer. A worn cam chain in a DR is simply not detramental. This is because of the valve timming differences between the DR and the 610. To get the performance that is available from the 610 the valves stay open longer ( duration ). This and the higher compression of the 610 means the 610's piston comes very close to the valves. If the valve timming varies because of cam drive wear the 610's piston will hit an open valve. This would start a chain reaction of engine parts breaking that could write off the engine.

Same story for a Chevy and a Ferrari. The valves in a Chevy ( stock Chevy ) can be wide open and the piston will clear them. Not the case in a Ferrari.

If you want the most power available you are going to have long duration and high compression. Meaning you are cutting it close in piston/valve clearance. So it is a precaution in high performance engines to service the cam drive often.

New Husky manuals have been revised to: check the cam chain at 6K and replacement the connection rod at 6K has been removed.

FYI: Photo is a V12 Ferrari crankshaft. Look how short the stroke is! What detail. Some Itialian must have spent hours rounding off all those edges!
Love that V12 sound!!!!
Yes but if I am not mistaken there are other high performance singles that do not have premature camchain wear. KTM 640 and 690 fpr example both make more power.

If it were not for the reed valve position perhaps the chains stretch would not matter.
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Old 01-17-2009, 07:45 AM   #9047
lagcam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Countdown
I think I took his last one but he also told me that after looking the new 610 chain is wider than the old one so the Tsubaki BF 05 MA should not be the one for the late motor.
Busted out my trusty calipers and took some measurments if anyone has something to compare. 122 links (pins) with a .250 pitch.
You can see that the plates are just sheared (not machined) but I've never really looked closely at any other cam chains so maybe that's normal?
Back in my car racing days, we always used double roller timing chains in place of the stock silent type because of stretching problems. Also, 122 links is pretty long for a 1/4 inch pitch silent chain. A 96 link chain stretches way slower than a 122 (.001 wear on each pin means .96 stretch vs. .122). I wonder if that may be a factor in the 610 chain problem? That being said, there are a lot of high mileage GSXR's and such with long chains, so what do I know? There are a lot of factors at work. Even the location of the tensioner matters. If it's in the middle of the span, it's got more leverage on the chain than if it's closer to a sprocket, if you see what I mean.

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Old 01-17-2009, 08:00 AM   #9048
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashman1
If it were not for the reed valve position perhaps the chains stretch would not matter.
Well, it wouldn't hit something as soon, but the cam timing would still change. The tensioner is only taking slack out of one side of the chain, which changes when the cam opens valves in relation to piston movement. On a dual cam engine, the overlap between intake and exhaust also changes slightly as the chain wears. In some engines (see fritz's post) you could also have some valve/piston clearance problems when the timing moves. I once built a drag racing engine (small block ford) with .610 lift cam and domed pistons. The valves would actually brush carbon off pistons when we let the timing chain get a little worn. We ended up using a gear drive instead.
What fritz said about DR vs. 610 is true. The Husky no doubt has more radical valve timing, not to mention heavier valve springs and also runs more rpm, all of which is hard on a chain.
At any rate, if I only have to change the 610's chain every couple of seasons, I'm not going to stress about it! Top Fuel guys rebuild engines every 1/4 mile!
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Old 01-17-2009, 03:56 PM   #9049
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I know this is off topic but does anyone know where I can down load a wiring schematic for the '02 TE610? Thanks for any info.
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Old 01-17-2009, 04:32 PM   #9050
Flashman1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lagcam
Well, it wouldn't hit something as soon, but the cam timing would still change. The tensioner is only taking slack out of one side of the chain, which changes when the cam opens valves in relation to piston movement. On a dual cam engine, the overlap between intake and exhaust also changes slightly as the chain wears. In some engines (see fritz's post) you could also have some valve/piston clearance problems when the timing moves. I once built a drag racing engine (small block ford) with .610 lift cam and domed pistons. The valves would actually brush carbon off pistons when we let the timing chain get a little worn. We ended up using a gear drive instead.
What fritz said about DR vs. 610 is true. The Husky no doubt has more radical valve timing, not to mention heavier valve springs and also runs more rpm, all of which is hard on a chain.
At any rate, if I only have to change the 610's chain every couple of seasons, I'm not going to stress about it! Top Fuel guys rebuild engines every 1/4 mile!
You still don't address why other high performance engine (big thumpers) don't seem to have the probem.

I put my manual CCT on at about 3000 miles and at 6000 just checked it with the Hoder method - 7 clicks out.

No change in 3000 miles.
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Old 01-17-2009, 05:21 PM   #9051
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRider
I know this is off topic but does anyone know where I can down load a wiring schematic for the '02 TE610? Thanks for any info.
I think I got mine from the service manual. I had to xerox pages and tape it together.
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Old 01-17-2009, 06:06 PM   #9052
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy Unlimited
The Odyssey PC310 has a CCA of 200. it is 2.6lbs lighter then the Yuasa YTZ-14S and a little weaker but similar to your less dense lower cost Yuasa YTS-14BS. In general the Odyssey is a deep draw battery which can take more abuse then normal batteries and will recover from being completely drained. Therefore they are great for Jeep winching, marine applications etc. They also tend to have weaker CCA for the same rate because the rating test is slightly shorter and different then the rest of the battery industry.
I searched for a good deal on the PC310 and found www.tnrbatteries.com is selling them for $151 + free shipping. Pretty pricey but the peace of mind that I won't have to fiddle with it for a couple of years makes it worth it.
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Old 01-17-2009, 10:34 PM   #9053
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Countdown
I think I got mine from the service manual. I had to xerox pages and tape it together.
I sort of figured one could be found in the service manual but unfortunately I don't have one, in fact I don't even own a TE610. I'm designing a dual sport kit wireing harness for a friend with a Husky. It's suposed to be a surprise so I don't want to ask to borrow his. His current DSK is an AC system that's not working well and not legal, so I'm designing a DC system with a battery and charging circuit, reg/rect, the works. If anyone can help me out with a schematic of the stock wireing I'm glad to share the design when I'm done.
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Old 01-18-2009, 02:34 AM   #9054
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lagcam
Busted out my trusty calipers and took some measurments if anyone has something to compare. 122 links (pins) with a .250 pitch.
You can see that the plates are just sheared (not machined) but I've never really looked closely at any other cam chains so maybe that's normal?
Back in my car racing days, we always used double roller timing chains in place of the stock silent type because of stretching problems. Also, 122 links is pretty long for a 1/4 inch pitch silent chain. A 96 link chain stretches way slower than a 122 (.001 wear on each pin means .96 stretch vs. .122). I wonder if that may be a factor in the 610 chain problem? That being said, there are a lot of high mileage GSXR's and such with long chains, so what do I know? There are a lot of factors at work. Even the location of the tensioner matters. If it's in the middle of the span, it's got more leverage on the chain than if it's closer to a sprocket, if you see what I mean.

I'm not tring to be a smart ass but chain pitch is measured as follows:


Chain pitch is the distance between any three consective rivets divided by two.

The above example is a chainsaw chain but I believe it applied to timing chains also. In a chainsaw it makes a hugh difference because the inter-links or drive links are shorter. Looking at the timing chain picture, it may not change. This may be of value if you are shopping around for a new chain and are looking at the specs.

bass_on_tap screwed with this post 01-18-2009 at 02:43 AM
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Old 01-18-2009, 10:14 AM   #9055
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Eh? right stuff sealer

a while back people recomended right stuff for valve covers ect. has any body taken them off be careful that stuff works but you may need a hammer and chisel to get it back apart. Bill
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Old 01-18-2009, 12:06 PM   #9056
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I think you will be happy with how your green krylon fusion holds up. Mine has been sticking well for over a year. Your bike looks cool, man.
Here is a pic from yesterday's dualsport ride, a little ways South of Austin TX.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Olas Altas
The husky's been getting some love lately. Riding the XT for a few days and then hopping on the Husky reminded me why this bike is so awesome! It rips!!

New rear, BRP chain guide, new chain slider, windshield for the winter months, sidepanels were painted green. A few things still need to be painted to finish the new looks i'm going for. I did the side panels as a test to try out krylon fusion and so far i'm impressed. Soon it will be getting a new cam chain. Haven't checked it in a while but i'm at 9000 miles so replacing it won't be a bad idea.





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Old 01-18-2009, 07:21 PM   #9057
lagcam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bass_on_tap
I'm not tring to be a smart ass but chain pitch is measured as follows:


Chain pitch is the distance between any three consective rivets divided by two.

The above example is a chainsaw chain but I believe it applied to timing chains also. In a chainsaw it makes a hugh difference because the inter-links or drive links are shorter. Looking at the timing chain picture, it may not change. This may be of value if you are shopping around for a new chain and are looking at the specs.
I think you're right, and I did measure it that way too (it was .5 between three pins, so 1/4" pitch). Sorry if my illustration caused some confusion.
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Old 01-18-2009, 07:52 PM   #9058
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lagcam
I think you're right, and I did measure it that way too (it was .5 between three pins, so 1/4" pitch). Sorry if my illustration caused some confusion.
So this chain is in Inches , even though the rest of the bike is Metric?
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Old 01-19-2009, 06:23 AM   #9059
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'08 TE610s have throttle stop?

So I have been reading threads on other boards, and there was a nice how-to on removing the throttle stop on a TE. Turns out that was an '08 510, not a 610, so I started asking questions about the 610.

I've been getting conflicting information, so here goes another round.

Does the '08 TE610 have a throttle stop?
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Old 01-19-2009, 06:42 AM   #9060
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian™
So I have been reading threads on other boards, and there was a nice how-to on removing the throttle stop on a TE. Turns out that was an '08 510, not a 610, so I started asking questions about the 610.

I've been getting conflicting information, so here goes another round.

Does the '08 TE610 have a throttle stop?
I asked at the dealer when I got mine, and was told that they didn't. I haven't actually verified this myself though.
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