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Old 05-13-2012, 06:43 AM   #661
JohnLocke
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Seat interchagability?

Does anyone know which year's/models seats are interchangeable with my 1974 R90?
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Old 05-13-2012, 08:10 AM   #662
disston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W8EJO View Post
Does anyone know which year's/models seats are interchangeable with my 1974 R90?
Some of the /5 seats fit. What's called the LWB /5, that stands for Long Wheel Base. Not all /5 seats fit. They also have SWB, that stands for Short Wheel Base. The LWB /5 fits.

All the /6 seats fit except S bike, the R90S.

The /7 seat will fit if also done with the tank. The /7 tank is longer so if done with out the tank there will be a large gap between seat and tank. I guess you could say the /7 does fit but looks funny.
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Old 05-13-2012, 01:15 PM   #663
JohnLocke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
Some of the /5 seats fit. What's called the LWB /5, that stands for Long Wheel Base. Not all /5 seats fit. They also have SWB, that stands for Short Wheel Base. The LWB /5 fits.

All the /6 seats fit except S bike, the R90S.

The /7 seat will fit if also done with the tank. The /7 tank is longer so if done with out the tank there will be a large gap between seat and tank. I guess you could say the /7 does fit but looks funny.
Thanks. good info.
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Old 05-15-2012, 07:47 PM   #664
patanga
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Clutch & throttle cables

Not sure if this has already been mentioned on an earlier page but here goes; When fitting clutch and or throttle/choke cables I always tie a piece of string to one end of the cable prior to removing the old cable. I reattach the string to the new cable prior to replacement. That way the string is the lead and I am never in any doubt as to the original routing of the cable as I thread it back through. Saves much time and head scratching.

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Old 05-15-2012, 07:58 PM   #665
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Centre stand springs

I've heard of people having great difficulty refitting these so here is my quick & easy fitting tip; I use 2 zippy ties (one will likely break) and I make two loops in parallel ( a single insulated wire loop would probably work as well) which I attach through the eye of the spring not attached to the frame. I tie the other end of the two loops together with a length of twine/rope that is strong enough to overcome the spring tension (but will obviously not break the twine). The plastic ties grip the spring end when things start getting cramped whereas a steel wire loop is likely to slip off and sit you on your backside. This setup will allow you to pull the spring in a linear direction (which is how these springs work) far enough to attach them the the side stand fixing lug. Forget using side cutters at 90 degrees, or brake spring tools as you will be able to fit these springs in less than 10 seconds (once all is lined up) using
this method. Good luck

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patanga screwed with this post 06-15-2012 at 07:11 PM
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Old 05-15-2012, 08:05 PM   #666
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Holding set RPM by hand when timing ignition

Another tip from my tuning techniques is that when holding RPM at 3000ish RPM to set max advance timing it helps to have a second person to hold the throttle. You will usually find that the person continually fluctuates the RPM up and down trying to keep it steady. Easy fix is to have them to get the RPM close to the target setting and then hold the collar on the throttle grip still like a throttle lock with a thumb grip from their other hand. (i.e. two hands) Easier to fine tune and hold RPM steady that way.

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patanga screwed with this post 06-15-2012 at 07:12 PM
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Old 05-15-2012, 08:10 PM   #667
patanga
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Avoiding unintended earthing

During some repairs I prefer to remove the battery earth connection from the gearbox and then let the terminal hang loose. To avoid the risk of unintended earth contact and risk shorting the diode board I attach a length of garden hose over the terminal to keep it insulated & out of harms way.

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patanga screwed with this post 06-15-2012 at 07:12 PM
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Old 05-15-2012, 08:28 PM   #668
patanga
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Gearbox and drive line oils

Several years ago I was keen to try and improve the gear shifting feel on my airheads and after checking different oil grades and talking with an oil analyst I decided to try some LS90 weight oil ("LS" as in Limited Slip diff oil) I was very impressed by the improved smoothness and feel of the box. LS oil is not recommend in gearboxes where phosphor bronze parts (i.e.synchro rings) are used, but as our airheads have no p b bits I decided to test the theory.

After some distance and feeling very happy with the result I had a chat with a respected BM repairer only to be told he had come to the same conclusion himself. "Been doing the it for years" he said. It is now in my drive shaft and final drive as well. Great stuff and good results.

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patanga screwed with this post 06-18-2012 at 02:36 PM
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Old 05-18-2012, 10:42 PM   #669
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Limited slip

I also tried limited slip and thought the improved shifting was just me imagining it. Good to find out someone else has had a similar result.
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Old 05-19-2012, 02:08 PM   #670
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Limited Slip is an additive for the friction plates of the wet clutch in bikes with wet clutches and Limited Slip rear ends in cars. No idea why this should work in Airhead transmissions. I guess I'm just used to way mine shifts.
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Old 05-21-2012, 03:43 AM   #671
patanga
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Hi diston. The LS90 oil is still 90 weight but yes the additive is for the LS clutch plates etc.. Definately a smoother change end result.

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patanga screwed with this post 06-15-2012 at 07:14 PM
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Old 05-21-2012, 03:54 AM   #672
patanga
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Brake bleeding tip

I've seen some strange and expensive contraptions for brake bleeding on bikes & cars, but I've had good success by using a cheap 60ml hospital style syringe with a length of clear pvc tubing fitted to the syringe body and the other end obviously connected to the brake bleeder nipple.

The syringe will give plenty of suction, and for the small volumes that we are dealing with on our bikes the capacity is plenty good enough. i.e. fit hose, crack nipple, pull syringe handle, draw fluid, bleed, keep an eye on the reservoir level, close nipple & you're done. This tool makes bleeding an easy one man job. The syringe also comes in handy for when the reservoir is a little over filled. After use just cycle some water through it to help preserve the plunger rubber from brake fluid contamination.

One more tip on this device; Make sure to drill a small hole in the side of the syringe body close to the top, near the limit its extension (i.e. the 55ml point) and then fit a largish blunted PK screw into the syringe body so that the plunger can not be completely pulled out of the body by accident during bleeding. Last thing you need is brake fluid all over your paintwork. Cheers guys.

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patanga screwed with this post 06-15-2012 at 07:14 PM
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Old 05-21-2012, 08:02 AM   #673
mark1305
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You can also get those syringes with what's called a catheter tip. Also referred to as feeding syringes. The catheter tip is even easier to stick a hose onto.
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Old 05-21-2012, 09:39 AM   #674
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It's easier using a syringe to fill from the bottom. Fill your syringe with brake fluid. Make sure the res. is empty and plunge from bottom to fill the res. way quicker. Feed stores or tack/ferrier shops are best place to find that big syringe.
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Old 05-21-2012, 08:16 PM   #675
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The one above is called a luer lock. I has some advantages too. If the tubing used is also luer lock, then there's no chance it'll disconnect under pressure from the plunger..

The syringe can also come as a "catheter" tip where the tubing is a push fit on a tapered tip. It's more secure than a push fit on a luer lock tip, but not as secure as a correct luer lock connection.
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