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Old 08-19-2013, 07:30 PM   #841
Plaka
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Originally Posted by shearboy2004 View Post
Been hunting around for bulbs for tach and voltmeter on my 88 R100GS .
Found Mercedes uses them too so picked 4 up for $7.89

Mercedes part number 78180
A good post for the "dark secrets" thread. That one covers secondary parts sources.
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Old 08-20-2013, 06:47 AM   #842
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Originally Posted by Zodiac View Post
FYI -

McMaster Carr makes a really decent box of black pop rivets (plastic breakways just like OEM), but they're about 10x easier to install, and less 1/4 of the price of OEM.


And can be installed easily with any typical pop rivet gun (cheap) and some experience using one.


http://www.mcmaster.com/#90219a330/=o4th0n
Certainly cheap @ $4.57 per pack of 20. A much better proposal than the oem version. The tool is something the rivets/studs (whatever their real name is) I use just don't need and they're sturdy enough to be reused forever. The set I use now have been on the bike for almost 10 years.
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:02 PM   #843
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r90/6 Wheel Bearing Replacement/Upgrades

Can someone point me in the direction of good info on this... I'm sure it's been hashed out many times and I've found a few lively discussions about it but just looking for something concrete.

Getting ready to go on a trip and thinking about replacing my unknown mileage wheel bearings before I go.



Thanks!
Claude
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:20 PM   #844
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Originally Posted by kanakaka View Post
Can someone point me in the direction of good info on this... I'm sure it's been hashed out many times and I've found a few lively discussions about it but just looking for something concrete.

Getting ready to go on a trip and thinking about replacing my unknown mileage wheel bearings before I go.



Thanks!
Claude
Later bikes use a different bearing and it's sealed. My R90/6 uses a generic bearing that I can buy anywhere in the country. I changed them when I first bought the bike 15 years ago and again about 5 years ago. So after 10 years my bearings were in need of changing. Maybe I didn't grease them too regular and the preloading adjustment is important. You'll want to get the shim kit from Cycle Works if you want to have a fairly easy way to adjust the preload. I think one kit will usually do both wheels and then some.

The generic bearing I mention for the early bikes is 30203. About half the price of BMW's bearing. The early bikes use this same bearing in the swing arm. So 6 bearings does one bike. (again if it's an early bike)
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Old 08-21-2013, 05:16 PM   #845
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Originally Posted by kanakaka View Post
Can someone point me in the direction of good info on this... I'm sure it's been hashed out many times and I've found a few lively discussions about it but just looking for something concrete.

Getting ready to go on a trip and thinking about replacing my unknown mileage wheel bearings before I go.



Thanks!
Claude
With halfway decent maintenance the /5, /6 and /7 bearings they are good for over a million miles. Really. Somone did a good presentation on the relationship between preload and lifespan. Don't have it on tap. it's findable on the web. The bottom line was they are good for vast mileages even if the preload isn't precise.

Disston mentions a "generic" bearing. Have to dissagree---no such animal really. The number specifies the bearing. Period. Various people make them,, all good. SKF, FAG, Fafnir, etc. Avoid eBay sellers and cheapo Chinese bearings. Going to a bearing house should save you 10-15USD over a dealer. More than that, be suspect.

Prepping for a trip, it's the last thing I would be concerned with. Maybe grease them if it hasn't been done in a few years. The first thing I would worry about is the alternator rotor. Know how to test it, have the gear to do so and either carry a spare or have one boxed at home with someone that can mail it to you. Have a puller bolt, properly homemade or commercial, with the spare rotor. If yours hasn't been off in a long time, R&R it making sure the tapers are wiped-with-alcohol clean---just so you know it isn't stuck and going to give you grief. A spare rotor is always money well spent, even if you have to buy with out a core to exchange. The ones Rich at mottorad Electric sells are nice. He changed the potting in his builds some time ago (per a recent conversation w/ him) for even greater reliability. I posted something in T&T awhile back on reinforcing the stock ones. You will need that spare eventually and the price never goes down. Only exception is if you just replaced it and it's been tested a few thousand miles. I've ridden several thousand miles cross country with a dead rotor. If I didn't have a kickstart it would have been even a bigger pain that it was. I do the 'spare' thing now. Get fancy and make a bracket and it will fit behind the battery to one side.


If the carbs have 10 years untouched (common, they run forever and need nothing--mine are at 95k miles with only some new o-rings for fun), maybe put in your spare diaphragms. Easy to change on the road but unless you use the shorting sync method not so easy to retune it on the road. There are some tricks you can do before you take the tops off to preserve the existing tune.

After that is clutch cables. Check at the handlebar. As long as the cables is perfect, not so much as one broken strand, and the cable end pivots smoothly in the lever, you're golden. If one or more broken strands or if the pivoting isn't perfect, I mean perfect, then replace or string a spare along side.

Tap all your spokes with a wrench and listen for a dead one. Trips often mean lots of luggage load. So broken spokes on the rear more common. Silicone over the heads on the rear for CYA if one breaks.

Carry a device to static set the timing. Inspect whatever seals your points compartment. Often could use a new rubber. Makes points last longer.

There is a thread going on "what should I take on a trip" w/ regard to spares and whatnot. Read the last comment, by Anton. But bear in mind that Anton is a pro and his bikes in top shape. I know another pro that will happily head out w/ a poorly running bike and come home with one in excellent shape. (And he says as much). But again, he's a pro--and he packs a rather nice torque wrench on the road. I was with him one time on a 4000 mile run to the east coast and back. He lost a diaphram in one carb. Limped to the next rest are just as it started to rain. He had the carb repaired and the motor tuned by the time the cloud passed. I have 2 small mods to my carbs that make it even faster and easier. If I was going a couple states out, I'd carry some spares. Because I live at altitude I also carry jets and rejet when I hit the lowlands.

Please consider something, and also please don't take offense. This question comes up here and there. The reason people ask is because they are inexperienced. No problem, you have to start somewhere. But it's a solid fact that the road to getting experienced involves paying some dues, ie, making some mistakes. many mistakes are nothing more than fixing or replacing something that didn't need it. So someday you will know you spent some money you didn't have to. Fine, you learned a new procedure. Other mistakes will strand you. Classic example: a certain person I know didn't tighten the rocker cover nuts correctly after a valve setting. Cover fell off on the highway leaving the guy stranded next to the concrete barrier in the middle of 12 lanes of fast traffic at 11:00 at night. Took him 45 minutes (by his telling) to get across the 6 lanes in his direction, find a gap in the sound wall and wander around a neighborhood looking for someone who could place a call to a total stranger for help. So I'm standing on this ladies front lawn at midnight, one boot soaked with oil and my anonymous book in my hand...Dues.

Upshot of that is that just before a trip is not the time to risk making mistakes that could compromise the trip. Do anything that really needs doing 2-3+ month ahead to have time to shake things down. Never do anything that doesn't need doing. Do that stuff some other time when you maybe won't be riding for months anyway.

Back to the bearings. Feel the hubs after a ride and determine if one feels unusually hot. A drum brake can heat up a hub so lay off the rear brake. Feel for play with the wheel on the bike, try to rock it. Then turn the bearings wheel off and feel for roughness or binding. Maybe get ambitious and pull the top hat spacers, seals and inner bearing, clean everything, inspect and re-grease. Don't reshim. If it was ever good it still is. if it wasn't and it matters, you will be looking at a damaged bearing. IIRC it's not involved on the /6. On the /7 changing bearings is more complicated. If you are wondering, take a picture of the perfectly clean race and post up for opinions.

Two things kill bearings: Lubrication failure and running too loose. Lube failure can be from water---like a high pressure spray when washing, or overheating, like a dragging drum brake (I did this on a VW, grease sprayed out, hub smoking, finger cooked touching hub to see if it was hot). Symptom will be some discoloration if it's minor, pitting if the bearing is really shot. Moly grease will also give some discoloration. It's a good thing. Light brown is OK but better greasing needed. Blue or black, replace. Any pitting, replace. If the bearing is too loose it brinnels. Strong lines on the races from the center to the edge just the spacing of the rollers. They are actually depressions in the races. Feels rough or bumpy sometimes (you need to press hard to feel it). Not common on a wheel bearing but often seen on headset bearings. Replace, correct the preload. If the bearing has lots of miles there will be a definate band where the rollers run. It should be even all the way around. Usually is. Seals get re-used unless you really clobbered them taking out or you feel extravegant. If you see signs of grease failure, consider replacing. Make sure the top hats are nice and smooth, no deep ridges (caused by grit in the seal)

The odds are great the better place to put the money is in your wallet for goodies or problems on the trip.

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Old 08-21-2013, 05:24 PM   #846
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I agree with a lot of what Plaka says but again I didn't read it all. He doesn't like my use of the word "generic" but I think the intent is plain. The BMW part number is good at the BMW dealer. The "generic" number will find the bearing at the bearing store or on the Web. For that mater you can Google just that number and the bearing will show up in the first page.
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Old 08-21-2013, 06:36 PM   #847
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I agree with a lot of what Plaka says but again I didn't read it all. He doesn't like my use of the word "generic" but I think the intent is plain. The BMW part number is good at the BMW dealer. The "generic" number will find the bearing at the bearing store or on the Web. For that mater you can Google just that number and the bearing will show up in the first page.
OK, I see what you mean, I wasn't thinking of The BMW part number. I never buy them from the dealer. I wonder if the dealers even buy them from BMW?
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Old 08-22-2013, 04:51 AM   #848
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Thanks for the tips... much appreciated. Not a stranger to the road and have done quite a few multi-state trips on old iron. Had to chuckle at the "pay your dues" comment. Been there done that. When I do general maintainance on my bike I tend to keep the tools that I use in a seperate box and over time I start collecting a "tool kit" to carry with me... and I do tend to carry extra carb/points/cable/wheel parts with me. Things that get you down the road in a pinch.

Here's my former "Airhead" 1979 KZ1000 up near the Blue Ridge Parkway on an 8 day trip a couple of years ago...



I had the carbs off a couple of times during that trip along with a few other things but had an absolute blast. I had that bike for over 6 years and knew it well from front to back.



The KZ is gone and I'm now into the 1976 R90/6 and learning to like it... I haven't fallen in love with it yet and I haven't gotten to know it like I did the KZ but I'm going to be in the mountains for 9 days with it and am looking forward to a good bonding with it.

Thanks again for helping out with some basic foundational info on everyday life with a Beemer.

Cheers,
Claude

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Old 08-22-2013, 04:32 PM   #849
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Thanks for the tips... much appreciated. Not a stranger to the road and have done quite a few multi-state trips on old iron. Had to chuckle at the "pay your dues" comment. Been there done that. When I do general maintainance on my bike I tend to keep the tools that I use in a seperate box and over time I start collecting a "tool kit" to carry with me... and I do tend to carry extra carb/points/cable/wheel parts with me. Things that get you down the road in a pinch.

Here's my former "Airhead" 1979 KZ1000 up near the Blue Ridge Parkway on an 8 day trip a couple of years ago...



I had the carbs off a couple of times during that trip along with a few other things but had an absolute blast. I had that bike for over 6 years and knew it well from front to back.



The KZ is gone and I'm now into the 1976 R90/6 and learning to like it... I haven't fallen in love with it yet and I haven't gotten to know it like I did the KZ but I'm going to be in the mountains for 9 days with it and am looking forward to a good bonding with it.

Thanks again for helping out with some basic foundational info on everyday life with a Beemer.

Cheers,
Claude
The Lester Mags are aftermarket. The bearing stack will be slightly different. I Wouldn't change my comments re: the bearing because of it tho'. You may have a captive bearing on one side of those. Fork brace also aftermarket. See if the top triple clamp is a flat plate or a thick aluminum thing that clamps the tubes.

If you have the factory underseat toolkit you have pretty much everything you need. The pliers and screwdrivers are often poor. I like to replace the feeler gauges with good Go/No-go ones but the original; miniature ones have a tool for a setting on the under tank MC. I never missed it. Aftermarket points setting tool (the tube thing) seems to be popular. There are a couple of special tools in there you want.

Make a habit of shutting off the petcocks when you shut off the engine, especially if you are on reserve and can't afford a gas puddle. Intermittant sticky float needles on Bings are legendary. Don't let the choke cable touch the back of the petcock.

Different people use different petcock strategies. Some like both on then both reserve. I like right on, left off, then then left on when right runs dry, then left to reserve and finally right to reserve (to be avoided). Some say running dry more often risks it happening at a bad moment, like in the middle of a tight pass. In 25 years it never happened to me....until 2 weeks ago. Then I just had to crack up. I actually run 3 tanks so my strategy these days is a bit more involved, but I still handle the main tank the same way.


The stock sidestand sucks in many ways. Typically replaced. The Brown works well. The old Luftmeister is better IMNSHO but rare.

The original rear shocks were shot within a couple years of being new. When that bike was new the Koni 7610P was the "best" replacement. Today there are the Ikons (what Koni became after a change of ownership) and many others.


If you have plenty of mechnicing experience there are fewer dues, but you still don't escape. New machine to learn as you point out.

Not many 'gotchas' on the beemer. Center nut on rocker covers extremely easy to over tighten and strip. But then it doesn't do anything and you can run forever without it, and it's a trivial repair a couple ways. First time the exhaust nuts come off you need the correct tool (current thread lists a half dozen) and you want them to unscrew, not strip the threads on the head (costly repair), Much care there then yearly refreshing of the generous amount of anti-sieze you will use. Know all the lube locations, know about the clutch cable at the handlebar and set the free play, etc. The bolt that hold the speedo cable and battery ground at the transmission is also a breather and easy to mis-thread or strip. The boot there on the speedo cable keeps water out of the tranny. Must be in good shape, frequently packed with grease or silicone. Glopping on silicone adhesive will patch a worn one for awhile. The smaller drain and fill bolts in the rear drive easy to strip. Rubber boot at the driveshaft to tranny joint keeps water out of the shaft. Must not be cracked or split. Things to know about the bolts in there and it ain't the 12pt heads. Watch for fogging in the instruments. If seen research the issue. Overall very simple and strait forward machine. Well tuned it's a touring animal. Not a lot of power or brakes but it will knock out far longer days than you want to ride and it will cruise all day long at any speed it's capable of, typically 90 to 110mph, and be very happy doing both. A half a million miles later it's still doing it. People have run over a million miles on them. At 60,000 it's getting broken in. The BMW factory high mileage registry kind on became a joke. Everybody was in.

There are some things to know about proper comport as an owner. Certain neuroticisms are favored and they can be cultivated if they don't come naturally. Obsessiveness, including repairing everything in sight, all of which doesn't need it, changing oil too often, engaging in long and tedious threads about the proper oil (often), etc. You don't do the "lifestyle" thing (a la Harley folk). BMW logo underwear is not needed nor are stickers on your truck. Your bike runs, it doesn't need the truck.. There were some changes with the advent of the new series bikes. So Aerostitch gear is required in some circles. With a /6 you can skip it. Well worn but high quality leathers work fine. If you meet people on the rod with a medium sized stuffed animal strapped on the back, typically a Coyote, and they are running very fast, you will have met a member of one of several national clubs, SFWEC in that case. IBMWR is the one you want to know about the most, as well as possibly the Airheads (the "simple by choice" crowd. I don't think they have a choice and avoid most of them). There are others.

Making "cafe" bikes seems to be popular these days. The majority are hollow and cliche styling jobs. I have seen two that weren't, one commercially built (Ritmo Sereno). The base platform is all wrong. If you can get 90 HP out of an airhead motor you know your stuff...and spent a lot of money. Then the shaft proceeds to eat up a bunch of it. The KZ is far more the platform. It'll run---doesn't look so silly. Kudos for going touring on it. But it's a BIC. The Beemer isn't.

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Old 08-22-2013, 05:51 PM   #850
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Thanks for the common sense replies along with a bit of folk wisdom. Very helpful.

I don't want to de-rail this thread too much but I'll post up another thread elsewhere when I get the bike ready... trip is planned from Sept 13 - 24. If it's somewhat interesting I may post a few pics afterwards.

Thanks again.

Cheers,
Claude
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:08 PM   #851
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I do not fix too many things that don't need fixing. I have been getting rid of rust lately. iIdon't think that is wasted time. Got rid of rust on handlebars and top triple clamp last month.

I don't change oil too often but I forget how old it is so maybe it could have gone longer. I think the last change was actually over due.

Be careful about modernizing these bikes. I think it can be over modernized. If you need more electricity then the bigger alternator is nice but not everybody needs it. I do like my AGM battery. I had to make some plywood shims to fit it in the stock box.

You have ignition points. They will serve you well if you either know or learn to take care of them. I'm generally against the modern electronic ignition conversion units but they may fit other riders better that they have fit me. I've tried them. I know how to do ignition points because I have done them all my life so I am happier with them than the Hall sensor/electronic gizmo.

I do believe in adding a Booster to the points. Then the points will last a long time and it's a win/win situation in my book.

If you want to throw money at an Airhead there are numerous performance and handling up grades that will keep you occupied for several years. Choose wisely. The original bike does quit well all on it's own.

Something to be careful to not break? There's a nut on the tip of the camshaft that holds the advance unit on the front of the cam. The advance unit is also the points cam and opens the ignition points. The advance unit is located by a "D" shape and the advance unit is held by this one small nut. The end of the engines cam is threaded here. The nut takes a 10mm wrench.(don't remember the thread size, but it is small) DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN 10mm NUT. It can and will break.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:12 PM   #852
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Originally Posted by kanakaka View Post
Thanks for the common sense replies along with a bit of folk wisdom. Very helpful.

I don't want to de-rail this thread too much but I'll post up another thread elsewhere when I get the bike ready... trip is planned from Sept 13 - 24. If it's somewhat interesting I may post a few pics afterwards.

Thanks again.

Cheers,
Claude
Bzzzzt!

Wrong answer.

A ride report is expected. Put it in the ride reports section of this site. Study others before you go to get the correct text/photo ratio understand the proper photos as well. Scenery, photogenic road food, girls on old bikes, better beers and other appropriate camp refreshment, girls. One pic of bike, properly loaded (use a duffel on top, lengthways, with the pad and tent poles etc in it. Touring on a beemer isn't the Beverly Hillbillies already!). No pics of mechanical work on bike unless more interesting; your crank or tranny mainshaft on a picnick table perhaps. Photos of burned wheel bearings that spun in the hub can be taken after you get home and posted in a Oh-crap-how-do-I-fix-this thread.

Friend of mine has a nice bike, 72 or 73 75/5, big tank like yours, better than a half million miles. He did a very long (year+) tour of the US in betweeen Vietnam and re-enlisting, and another when he got out. Also shipped it to Europe and toured extensively there. He carries a slim can of lemon Pledge and a dusting cloth on the road. Every morning he wafts some pledge on the pant and wipes off the dust. Polishes up the aluminum and chrome a bit (he has aluminum turn signal pods, you may, investigate) and that's it. The bike always looks fantastic. Just those few glints off the shiny bits and the clean paint does it. Not detailed by any means, it just doesn't take a lot for the effect. Some bad luck ended his big tour days, but he still rides some. Bike still looks fantastic, all these years after he walked out of a dealer with it new.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:35 PM   #853
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I do not fix too many things that don't need fixing. I have been getting rid of rust lately. iIdon't think that is wasted time. Got rid of rust on handlebars and top triple clamp last month.

I don't change oil too often but I forget how old it is so maybe it could have gone longer. I think the last change was actually over due.

Be careful about modernizing these bikes. I think it can be over modernized. If you need more electricity then the bigger alternator is nice but not everybody needs it. I do like my AGM battery. I had to make some plywood shims to fit it in the stock box.

You have ignition points. They will serve you well if you either know or learn to take care of them. I'm generally against the modern electronic ignition conversion units but they may fit other riders better that they have fit me. I've tried them. I know how to do ignition points because I have done them all my life so I am happier with them than the Hall sensor/electronic gizmo.

I do believe in adding a Booster to the points. Then the points will last a long time and it's a win/win situation in my book.

If you want to throw money at an Airhead there are numerous performance and handling up grades that will keep you occupied for several years. Choose wisely. The original bike does quit well all on it's own.

Something to be careful to not break? There's a nut on the tip of the camshaft that holds the advance unit on the front of the cam. The advance unit is also the points cam and opens the ignition points. The advance unit is located by a "D" shape and the advance unit is held by this one small nut. The end of the engines cam is threaded here. The nut takes a 10mm wrench.(don't remember the thread size, but it is small) DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN 10mm NUT. It can and will break.
10mm wrench would be M6 nut. Good point on that one, I had forgotten. Carb balancing too. http://www.eskimo.com/~newowl/settin..._CV_carbs.html

What are you doing w/ rust? I liked Simonize chrome polish for getting it off chrrome, has a light rubbing compound in it. But even with a lot of wax, it would come back. I tried to paint bolt heads. Tedious, wrench would trash the paint. Current attempts with baked oil not so great. Tough but not quite enough, slick as snot. May try it over a micro-sandblast and then an extended bake. Other than replating and stainless, got no more ideas.

There is an old trick for axles. You hang a leather strap from the exposed part with a weight on it. Keeps rust off there. But you gotta look at the leather strap. Maybe put some sort of decorative weight...

---------------------------------------------
To take it back to the T&T subject, your maintenance log can be priceless. Never miss an oil change again. Know when you might be due in the middle of a trip, how long your tires are lasting, how long valve adjustments last and any trending (like tightening exhausts,) and so on.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:07 PM   #854
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I remember your baking the parts in oil trick Plaka. So that didn't work as good as intended? Gun Bluing is baked on oil I think. It is also not a great sort of protection. Guns that are Blued will rust fairly easy.

I think I suggested Parkerizing? Ever tried that?

I used to use Mothers Mag Wheel polish and it made the triple clamp and handlebars look pretty good. The problem is really that the Chrome that BMW uses is poor quality. It is not a three part process but only Chrome applied to the steel, I think. So then I would apply a car wax, Turtle Wax or something, on top of the cleaned parts and it would look good for a few months. But the rust would come back.

This time I cleaned with Naval Jelly which is a prussic acid product and this is supposed to leave a treated surface that is somewhat resistant to rust. I then coated with a clear coat in a spray can I got at my local hardware store. Sorry I don't know what it is but it looks pretty good and is hardly if at all noticeable.

I also did some other work. I replaced the throttle tube and cam with new parts, cleaned the switches and painted the control holders. I had to sand all my black paint off because it didn't come out very good but I'll try something else next time.

Never had new throttle tube and cam parts. Almost a different World when the throttle action is so smooth.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:57 PM   #855
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I remember your baking the parts in oil trick Plaka. So that didn't work as good as intended? Gun Bluing is baked on oil I think. It is also not a great sort of protection. Guns that are Blued will rust fairly easy.

I think I suggested Parkerizing? Ever tried that?

I used to use Mothers Mag Wheel polish and it made the triple clamp and handlebars look pretty good. The problem is really that the Chrome that BMW uses is poor quality. It is not a three part process but only Chrome applied to the steel, I think. So then I would apply a car wax, Turtle Wax or something, on top of the cleaned parts and it would look good for a few months. But the rust would come back.

This time I cleaned with Naval Jelly which is a prussic acid product and this is supposed to leave a treated surface that is somewhat resistant to rust. I then coated with a clear coat in a spray can I got at my local hardware store. Sorry I don't know what it is but it looks pretty good and is hardly if at all noticeable.

I also did some other work. I replaced the throttle tube and cam with new parts, cleaned the switches and painted the control holders. I had to sand all my black paint off because it didn't come out very good but I'll try something else next time.

Never had new throttle tube and cam parts. Almost a different World when the throttle action is so smooth.
I would say not as well as I hoped. Yet I continue to be taunted by this incredible coating on my aluminum and stainless cookware. On the stainless, only a strong lye solution (oven cleaner) will touch it. The aluminum is hopeless. Been all over the Brownells catalog. All sorts of home plateing stuff. Costly and not really that tough. I have a Walther pistol with a black coating on the slide (Tenifer?). Tough but not tough enough. I had a S&W Model 41 at one time (new one) with the prettiest blued finish you could imagine. But the acids in a fingerprint could trash it. I smoked the sights so the thing usually looked a bit ratty, but never let a fingerprint stand on the metal. Screwed up my arm and sold it to a guy that wanted to hot rod it for national matches, for a bit more than I paid new. Anyway I'll figure out the oil eventually. If I get my truck running one of these days I'll put a test plate on the front bumper (it's a massive stainless square tube) with different bolts with more attempts and see how they do through the salty roads this winter.

My tub of Mothers dried out. Not bad stuff. Never tried it on chrome. I like Simichrome the best, comes in 9 oz tubs too, cheaper than the tubes. MAAS is a close second. Good waxes so the shine lasts. I polished some big steel rods for a model once. Wanted them to look like chrome. Spun up in a lathe and used the simichrome. I figured they would rust after a time (Ohio) but just had to make it through the presentation. 10 years later they still look like chrome---in a nice dry cardboard box. On my polished aluminum (and I seem to have a lot these days), once a year with a felt wheel and red rouge in a dremel and then some simichrome here and there.

Rustoleum in a small can, satin black, thin with Testors model enamel airbrush thinner and run through an airbrush. Control perches look like new and it's tough. I have a lot of touch up to do where the rattle can stuff is falling off. It's just too fragile. I'll be mixing up a batch of thinned can enamel and just have a painting day. Slow to dry tho'. I want to paint some aluminum side racks I made so I'll run it in a touch up gun as well. I know it won't take it there, in terms of abrasion from my luggage, but it's the edges that are critical so those should be OK. Still mulling over the main surfaces. Maybe some clear contact paper? I have a bunch left over from an early attempt on recoloring the stripes on the headlight glass. Finally got it but had to mask with electrical tape.

The clear coats, often a laquer, are good because they are easy to strip chemically. Eventually some yellow, some wear away...or both. I got some for my house. The interior door hinges, circs 1950's, are steel with some sort of gold paint that once may have looked like brass. Not a type of hinge that I can replace easily and some other hinge won't fit the doors. So I have a big bucket of sulfuric acid out back to dip them in---insta-strip and the rust vanishes as fast. Then acetic for a surface rust coat, then phosphoric for a black conversion coating. Then the clear laquer to preserve that. Stays dry here (anything over cat piss high does).

/7 only had chrome on the bars, grab handle and headlight trim. All were good (dry climate). The /5 had the fender braces and struts, brake rod, turn signal mounts, spokes as well...always rusty.

New throttle gears = less slack. Always feels mo' better. Mine not very worn, but sloppy as hell anyway. Contemplating modifications.
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