ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-02-2008, 04:06 PM   #106
scarysharkface
30-125
 
scarysharkface's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Lakland
Oddometer: 12,886
WalMart. Sydney, Nova Scotia. I simply laid between the bike and the curb and would have slept fine if not for the policewoman checking on me to verify that I was still "alright" and to tell me it was going to rain in 3 hours, 2.5 hours, 2 hours, 1.5 hours, 1 hour, .5 hour....



I should have just ridden out to the beach and camped under the bridge at Mira..



John
__________________

The road to Hell is paved...
Save $5 on a Smugmug subscription when you use my coupon:
yBr7OofIPuOP6
'98 DR350 for sale http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1000749
'09 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited for sale http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...8#post24898278
scarysharkface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 02:31 PM   #107
cevquit
maphead
 
cevquit's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: At the foot of the mighty Sierra Nevada
Oddometer: 637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klay
I picked a place after dark in a canyon many years ago somewhere in British Columbia. Unbeknownst to me, I was only a couple hundred feet from a major rail line. It was bit too big of a thrill the first time I was awoken in the night by a train going by. Whew. I was only 23 so I got over it fast and wasn't really bothered by the other six or seven trains that went by in the night.
I did the same thing on donner pass, I went up for a trials comp, we got there about 2am,never been there, and found a large gravel area, took out the bags and threw down in the dirt only to be awoken by the MAJOR rail line crossing the sierra just 50' away. They are starting an 80 mile decent to the Sacramento Valley there, and would have 6 engines on the back of the train running in full reverse to keep the trains under control. As the first one went by you could see the brakes glowing red and the sparks comming off the of the wheels. Every 30 minutes we got no sleep that night.

another time outside of downieville Ca, again we got there in the middle of the night, found a clearing on the side of the road, threw our bags down, got a good night sleep, to be awoken at 6AM by the logging crew that was based a couple hundred feet through the tree's.
__________________
I know there is a road up here somewhere
cevquit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 02:36 PM   #108
cevquit
maphead
 
cevquit's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: At the foot of the mighty Sierra Nevada
Oddometer: 637
KOA campgrounds

KOA campgrounds are all over, I think.
National forests are good for camping, jusy about anywhere.
State parks
BLM land
Many trailer parks have grassy areas for "Overnighters".
Ive had run ins with so many yokels that I dont trespass at all any more, have been shot at and held till the sherrif gets there at gun point is no fun.

Around these parts youl find pretty steep competition for under bridges and at riversides.

Throwing down in a urban setting can be a hassle to, depending on local LEO's, I was once asked to provide proof of work, by a local LEO. I was going to a bicycle race, drove all night to find out the venue was on fire, 15k acres worth, so I went donw the hill to the next little town to sleep a few hrs before the 300 mile drive home. I found a parking lot with at a closed convience store, pulled in threw my bag in the bed of truck, and wasnt there more than 1/2 before the sherrif showed up, he gave me a bunch of crap about vagrancy laws, did a wants and warrents check, and I was clean. So he then made a point of telling me he could haul me for vagrancy, so I replied that he'd better get his supervisor there and charge me or let me go. He got back on the radio for another ten minutes, then finally let me go, with a speech about not just sleeping whever i pleased.
__________________
I know there is a road up here somewhere

cevquit screwed with this post 03-04-2008 at 02:47 PM
cevquit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2008, 11:13 AM   #109
RottenScummyTroll
Traveler
 
RottenScummyTroll's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Bozeman, MT
Oddometer: 228
Stealth camping? Been there, done that...for two months and 13,000 miles.

Never had a single bad experience (well, except the one night in the thorny hedgerow between the truck route and the busy railroad...guess I'm not the only one to pull that move.)

I had a few simple rules that I followed:

1. Start looking for a place to camp at least an hour before dusk - you want to know what you're camping next to. It's real hard to tell where you're at in the dark.

2. Be gone before most people have had their coffee.

3. Don't ride/camp in anything that looks like it might be some kind of crop.

4. Don't camp on posted land.

5. Have a dark tent - my green North Face works well. I wouldn't be as happy in a bright yellow or orange one.

6. Where possible, get a good way off the road. Although, in flat country sometimes a gully right by the road is pretty hard to see.

7. Either have supper before you stop, or eat something cold in bed - save lights and cooking for the early morning when everyone is asleep.

Other than the above, you really don't have to worry about much. Even in the crowded East Coast I was able to pull this off.

Remember - it's really not that hard to be hidden. Hell, people driving down the road seldom see us when we're moving with our lights on - the last thing people are going to notice is a green tent with a bike behind it in the bushes off the highway...
RottenScummyTroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2008, 12:29 AM   #110
donnyh
Waiting for the Sun
 
donnyh's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Utah/SoCal Wandering the western dream
Oddometer: 6,044
Lots of good tips here, here's my two cents-

Get a headlamp with a red LED light. I use a cheapo everready one, $15, it has bright white and red settings.

When you have to set up camp in the dark, a headlamp helps a lot, and red isn't very visible from a distance, and inside a tent, the red LED can't be seen through the tent walls from more than 20' away or so.

It's nice to be able to see in a tent without broadcasting your existence to the world.

As a bonus, red LED won't mess up your night vision like white light does.




And tents aren't the only alternative, a bivy shelter is more low profile than a tent, and nothing leaves less of a trace than a hammock.
donnyh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2008, 01:57 AM   #111
Jamie Z
Beastly Adventurer
 
Jamie Z's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: almost Memphis
Oddometer: 7,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mocha_Monkey
I had a few simple rules that I followed:

7. Either have supper before you stop, or eat something cold in bed - save lights and cooking for the early morning when everyone is asleep.
I think we're twins. I'd love to travel with someone so like-minded.

My suggestion for #7 above, find a place to camp before sunset, like you say. Mark it in your GPS. Go grab dinner someplace, then come back to your marked campsite and set up your tent in darkness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cevquit
Throwing down in a urban setting can be a hassle to, depending on local LEO's, I was once asked to provide proof of work, by a local LEO. I was going to a bicycle race, drove all night to find out the venue was on fire, 15k acres worth, so I went down the hill to the next little town to sleep a few hrs before the 300 mile drive home. I found a parking lot with at a closed convience store, pulled in threw my bag in the bed of truck, and wasnt there more than 1/2 before the sherrif showed up, he gave me a bunch of crap about vagrancy laws, did a wants and warrents check, and I was clean. So he then made a point of telling me he could haul me for vagrancy, so I replied that he'd better get his supervisor there and charge me or let me go. He got back on the radio for another ten minutes, then finally let me go, with a speech about not just sleeping whever i pleased.
I wonder if its regional or attitude. Quit, I certainly mean no disrespect, but I've renegade camped all over the US and in many other places in the world, and I've been approached by maybe a dozen LEOs and a small handful of land owners. At worst, the land owners simply wanted to know what I was up to, and at best, they've offered me a more comfortable place to stay. None has ever told me I had to leave, and certainly none of them threatened me with firearms.

I've had two and a half negative experiences with LEOs. Let me explain. Most recently, I camped out at a boat ramp in an area overseen by the National Park Service. The campground cost $18 (or something) per night, so I just found a cheaper spot. In the morning while I was packing up, a ranger came by and informed me that camping wasn't allowed there. He asked for my DL. I continued to pack up my gear. After about ten minutes he came out and sternly explained that I shouldn't have camped where I'd been. Gave me back my license and I went on my way.

My worst experience with LEOs while renegade camping took place in Muscatine, IA--twice. In the evening, I picked out a spot near the Mississippi River in a small park. I went into town to have a beer and dinner. On the walk back, I was stopped by the police who told me the park was closed. I explained that I was traveling down the river and all my gear was down by the river, behind a small building. The officer, despite it being well past midnight, insisted that I could absolutely not set up a tent in the park. He pointed me to an open area downriver a short ways. A place I never found. Instead, I set up my tent straight-up on the boat ramp dock in front of the city. In the morning at about 6am (after about four hours sleep) an officer came down to the dock to tell me I could not sleep on the dock. I groggily got up and left. That's the worst thing that's ever happened to me while renegade camping all over, both rural and urban.

I later got the last laugh. Returning to Muscatine a year later, I was distributing "Certificates of Appreciation" to all those who helped me on my travels down the Mississippi. The Muscatine Police Department received a tongue-in-cheek certificate as the only place along the river where I was asked to move my tent. I spoke for about 20 minutes with the chief of police there, who accepted the certificate, and who backed up his officers, but conceded to me that they probably could have bent the rules that one time.

Aside from those rare occasions, every officer I've ever met has been friendly, often volunteering to pass by now and then to make sure I'm ok. A police officer in California made some late-night phone calls to let me sleep behind the firehouse, and officers in Caruthersville, MO invited me to set up my tent right in the middle of the city park.

Anyway... my point is that I think with the right attitude (and some luck) it's very easy to camp almost anywhere without trouble.

Quote:
And tents aren't the only alternative, a bivy shelter is more low profile than a tent, and nothing leaves less of a trace than a hammock
I like to set up my dark-colored tent between the road and my bike, thus blocking the shiny bits from any light sources. I don't mind the tiny tents, but a medium size tent makes good camouflage.

Jamie
__________________
I'm the Tent Space Guy Sign up to host fellow travelers here.

Budget Travel the Jamie Z Way

Jamie Z screwed with this post 03-08-2008 at 02:26 AM
Jamie Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2008, 03:49 PM   #112
RottenScummyTroll
Traveler
 
RottenScummyTroll's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Bozeman, MT
Oddometer: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Z
I think we're twins. I'd love to travel with someone so like-minded.
I've read your reports - likewise. Let's make it happen sometime.

[/hijack]

Johnny
RottenScummyTroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 11:18 PM   #113
HarryK
Adventurer
 
HarryK's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Western NC
Oddometer: 65
No Guns!!

Nice to hear that no firearms are needed for steath camping....I have told buddies and other riders about this and everyone of them says I am crazy to do it without a gun..'these days....you don't know who is gonna mess with ya" I don't own one and I would think that you'd probably get in more trouble in a lot of place by having one.
In June am gonna be riding from Tucson into Ca.- Joshua Tree to Sequoia to Yosemite then back thru Co. and home to NC. I plan to steath as much as possible, can't take the generators, dogs & loud people in the campgrounds. I'll also use the Tent Space thread.

Harry
HarryK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2008, 08:25 AM   #114
Tall Man
Freelancer
 
Tall Man's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: The Occident
Oddometer: 977
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryK
Nice to hear that no firearms are needed for steath camping....I have told buddies and other riders about this and everyone of them says I am crazy to do it without a gun..'these days....you don't know who is gonna mess with ya" I don't own one.
http://www.defense-training.com/quips/quips.html

I'm not making any judgements. I just ask that you read Mr. Farnam's page as time permits.

TM
Tall Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 12:12 PM   #115
Jamie Z
Beastly Adventurer
 
Jamie Z's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: almost Memphis
Oddometer: 7,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryK
Nice to hear that no firearms are needed for steath camping....
I'm not anti-gun at all... I used to own a couple, and have had the opportunity to shoot a number of friend's guns.

I think that possessing a firearm makes stealth camping even more dicey. Legal or not, having a firearm in your possession makes exchanges with officials much more intense.

In all my stealth camping, I've never once even remotely thought that having a gun would be helpful. There have been numerous times when I'm happy I don't have one. One of the first questions a cop or ranger will ask you if they stop to check out the tent is "Do you have any weapons?" Occasionally, I've had a local civilian approach my tent and offer beer, dinner, a shower, or a place to sleep inside. I think I might feel rather uncomfortable carrying a firearm into someone's home if they invited me inside.

I really hope this doesn't turn into a pro/anti gun argument. My argument is merely that it's a piece of equipment which isn't necessary when camping. At worst, someone might come down and tell you you can't camp where you are, though I've never had that happen.

Jamie
__________________
I'm the Tent Space Guy Sign up to host fellow travelers here.

Budget Travel the Jamie Z Way
Jamie Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 10:21 PM   #116
Dirty Harry
Coffee Addict
 
Dirty Harry's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Indiana
Oddometer: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by McB
I hear WalMart lets RVers stay in their parking lots. I wonder if they'd notice a tent and a bike?
This december I would stop at many'a wally worlds to warm up and grab a coffee at the mcD's, but then I would usually go to the empty field BESIDE or BEHIND the store to pitch my tent in the cover of darkness.

After I turned my bike off I would always look around for awhile to see if anyone had taken notice of me riding around in the field. That way you're not in the midst of snuggling into your sleeping bag when the security guard might come a knocken.

I found out its a good idea to put a branch or flat rock under your kickstand if its going to rain, or you will wake up with a "sleeping motorcycle" on its side in the morning.

Also, get a 15' cable and good lock. Not only can you lock your bike to something, but you can put it through the sleeve and leg of your wet riding gear and the opening of your helmet to they don't walk off during the middle of the night...

DH

PS. I also found out its "illegal" and you can be ticketed for sleeping in a parking spot beside your motorcycle at New Mexico rest stops... Luckily got warned before the trooper made his rounds that morning. It's anoying since 50 other people are sleeping right along side you in their cars or semis...
__________________
2001 EX500 -sold
2003 FXD -sold
1970 CB350 -in resto
2001 DR650 -sold
2005 DR650 -

DR's do it in the dirt...
Dirty Harry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 05:26 AM   #117
RoyB
Dartmouth, Massacusetts
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Dartmouth, MA
Oddometer: 1,578
Wide median strip on the highway, some hole in the woods beside a road, someplace you are not supposed to be (IE public water works), ........Camo back packing tent.....large camo nylon tarp.......Set up camp, throw camo tarp over bike and gear. go to sleep. No one is going to know you are there or bother you......Don't set up where LEOs go to take their naps (cemeteries, behind abandoned buildings, behind schools and libraries)
__________________
Roy B
Dartmouth, MA www.rvbprecision.com
2007 BMW K1200R Sport abs,2007 DL650 V Strom abs
2004 Honda VFR abs,2001 Moto Guzzi Rosso Mandello
1971 Honda Trail CT90
RoyB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2008, 10:32 PM   #118
swingset
Got the knack.
 
swingset's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Central Ohio
Oddometer: 10,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Z
I'm not anti-gun at all... I used to own a couple, and have had the opportunity to shoot a number of friend's guns.

I think that possessing a firearm makes stealth camping even more dicey. Legal or not, having a firearm in your possession makes exchanges with officials much more intense.

In all my stealth camping, I've never once even remotely thought that having a gun would be helpful. There have been numerous times when I'm happy I don't have one. One of the first questions a cop or ranger will ask you if they stop to check out the tent is "Do you have any weapons?" Occasionally, I've had a local civilian approach my tent and offer beer, dinner, a shower, or a place to sleep inside. I think I might feel rather uncomfortable carrying a firearm into someone's home if they invited me inside.

I really hope this doesn't turn into a pro/anti gun argument. My argument is merely that it's a piece of equipment which isn't necessary when camping. At worst, someone might come down and tell you you can't camp where you are, though I've never had that happen.

Jamie
It's an individual decision, for sure, and there's no denying that being armed can complicate a situation where you're dealing with landowners or LEO's'. I respect if someone feels they don't need to go armed when they ride.

And, the flip side is that your life is worth something, and for some of us returning home to our families is paramount, and being unarmed on the highway poses some risks too. I was mugged and severely beaten in a rest stop on my 20th birthday, in broad daylight. I still carry pins in my joints from that attack, which was unexpected and unprovoked. Till you live through the terror and helplessness of such an event, no one can really convince you of the old addage of "better to have a gun and not need it than to need it and not have it".

Carrying concealed (I'm a permit holder in 32 states), there's no reason for anyone to ever know I'm armed unless I'm posed with life-threatening violence, or in the few states where I'm legally bound to notify a police during an encounter. It's a non-issue, until it becomes an issue and by that time you can't go and arm yourself if you don't have a gun. I liken it to carrying a fire extinguisher. It's not paranoia, it's preparedness and if you choose to go without, you accept that when the fire happens you'll have to find other ways of coping.

The thing I know from my job as an addict counselor, is that meth and violence are getting into areas where they have NEVER been before in alarming numbers, and that means some very remote and rural places....it's very much an epidemic. Drug runners and meth-addicts are no one you want to meet in the middle of nowhere, unarmed, and alone. Meth makes you, literally, a zombie. You feel nothing, no consequences, no remorse, meth addicts are single-minded and can be very dangerous.

It's something to think about. I'd love to live in a world where I saw the bad things coming, or knew that where I was didn't have bad people roaming around in it. Sorry to say, I have no such power so I choose to be prepared even if it means some complication. Carrying a gun should never be comfortable, it should be comforting, as Tom Gresham likes to say.
__________________
The Rant-Fu blog & podcast ->Rant-Fu




swingset is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 07:53 PM   #119
DirtyOldMan
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Banjoland
Oddometer: 1,876
Well said Swingset.
Some of the best comments I've read on the subject.
__________________
Sandy Jackson
04 250 RFS

13 650 Terra

96 R1100R
DirtyOldMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2008, 08:29 AM   #120
Alton
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: St. Louis, USA
Oddometer: 292
I've done stealth camping several times. Usually just a sleeping bag at the entrance to a farmers field on a country road, well after dark. And I've always been up at dawn, so no worries about disturbing anyone.

I think my favorite was in KY with my brother. Got out on a back road around 10pm, pulled off on the side, hopped a fence, and walked to the top of a hill. Threw up some ball hammocks between a couple trees and passed out.

We woke up in the morning with a herd of cows looking at us. We had put the hammocks up across their path to the barn.
Alton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014