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Old 01-08-2007, 02:07 AM   #16
Joerg
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Hi,

(and Happy New year, btw ;-)
Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
I guess i'm torn on that method. You not only keep the metal bits out, you keep the fresh fluid out also.
The issue of "sealed" vs "non-sealed" is a long story ... but first, don't forget that that even the so-called "sealed" bearings do not offer a hermetic closure; it's more a plastic lip that covers the bearings' sides. One technical reason is probably that the "closed" bearings were supposed to keep their oil over a longer time, however the old /7 gearboxes reportedly did not use this "mix" of bearings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
Can you give more info on the shim stack thickness?
Here you are, including a spreadsheet to calculate what you need: http://homepage.sunrise.ch/mysunrise...box.htm#adjust ... the whole process is difficult to visualize from a description, but once you are presented with an open gearbox it all becomes sooo obvious
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Old 01-08-2007, 06:28 AM   #17
datchew
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You're the man Joerg. Either i'm blind or you've updated your site, or you have stuff hiding from me.

I missed that on your site somehow. Thanks.
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Old 01-08-2007, 07:42 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
You're the man Joerg. Either i'm blind or you've updated your site, or you have stuff hiding from me.
Last update of the gearbox page was 2006-11-26, which could mean that a visit to the optician might be due
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Old 01-08-2007, 07:44 AM   #19
datchew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joerg
Last update of the gearbox page was 2006-11-26, which could mean that a visit to the optician might be due
Could you just start typing in a larger font?
The average age of the bmw owner is like 50-something right? he he he.
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Old 01-08-2007, 08:40 AM   #20
Middleweightboxer
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The link to the web site is great. That is the way it is done.

We have a local mechanic that will assist home rebuilders with measuring and getting the shims correct for a small donation.

I believe Ed Korn sells some clay that can be placed between the bearings and the cover. You bake the transmission to cure clay then remove the cover and measure the cured clay to establish the existing clearances. If you don't have a measuring plate available this is a fall back procedure. Here is Ed's listing:
MOLD-A-GAUGE
Non stick, non shrink, heat cured material, used to measure the end play of the input, intermediate, and output shafts on the /2 /5 /6 /7 R26 R27 and probably other BMW transmissions. Has to be heated to 275F (135C) for 25 minutes (oven). You will need a caliper (preferably dial) to measure the thickness of the cured MOLD-A GAUGE. Replaces Matra numbers 504 5061 and BMW 23 3 650. Enough for at least 4 transmissions......$7 (0.1 lb)

This is a good method for the home rebuilder. Good luck.
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Old 01-08-2007, 11:05 AM   #21
Suppermotodd OP
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Double Sealed Bearing

I removed the new 6304 non sealed bearing and replaced it with a new sealed bearing. The later paralever gearboxes came this way from the factory so I am going to keep it that way. The expert at the bearing supply place said it is normal to see sealed bearing next to the shaft seal. This helps control fluid from leaking around the output seal.

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Old 01-08-2007, 11:13 AM   #22
datchew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suppermotodd
I removed the new 6304 non sealed bearing and replaced it with a new sealed bearing. The later paralever gearboxes came this way from the factory so I am going to keep it that way. The expert at the bearing supply place said it is normal to see sealed bearing next to the shaft seal. This helps control fluid from leaking around the output seal.
That's an interesting thing to say. Maybe he thinks you're dealing with a tranny with a pump in it. these are splash type lube unless I really missed something.

hey, the blue sure looks purty!
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Old 01-08-2007, 03:29 PM   #23
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I changed the sealed (and failed) output shaft bearing on my GS to an open type on my recent rebuild. Had 72,000 miles on the clock.
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Old 01-08-2007, 04:01 PM   #24
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Just curious, but who makes the bearing (blue seal) you just installed?
Is it Japanese?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Suppermotodd
I removed the new 6304 non sealed bearing and replaced it with a new sealed bearing. The later paralever gearboxes came this way from the factory so I am going to keep it that way. The expert at the bearing supply place said it is normal to see sealed bearing next to the shaft seal. This helps control fluid from leaking around the output seal.

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Old 01-08-2007, 06:34 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSPD750
Just curious, but who makes the bearing (blue seal) you just installed?
Is it Japanese?
Reason I'm asking is because a local car tranny shop where I was sourcing
my bearings tried to sell me a Chinese bearing (6304) which was sealed and if I remember correctly it had blue seals as in your pic. Found out later it was for an electrical motor installation and I later returned it. A Chinese bearing in my GS gearbox is sub-standard IMO. I ended up buying Fag and Koyo.
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Old 01-09-2007, 06:37 AM   #26
Boojum
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Where's the pics, Todd? When I talked to you last night, you were cooking a Transmission! How did it come out?


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Old 01-17-2007, 01:12 PM   #27
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Thumb Pics

It is done and here are the pics.



Replaced the roller with a k bike stainless steel one.



Mold a Gage then bake or SMOKE at 275.





Taste Like Chicken!





Measure and shim it up.





Install in PD.



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Suppermotodd screwed with this post 01-17-2007 at 01:17 PM
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:32 PM   #28
datchew
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Awesome. Great pics. Did you use one of the Ed Korn videos or did you just do this from the book?
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:14 PM   #29
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Thumb Video

I got the Ed Corn video. It is most informative...
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Old 01-18-2007, 07:14 AM   #30
bmwblake
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i love that you found a way to work your smoker into a transmission repair. i just hope your next bird doesn't taste like transmission.
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