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Old 08-31-2012, 03:27 AM   #3646
xtscruff
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Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 20
i havent ventured to far on it, just a sprinkling of lanes in east anglia (england), the tenere takes whatever track i throw at it in its stride, all i got to do is change the tyres for something a bit better than bridgestone trial wings, (on bike when i got it) i dont itend on destroying the tenere on the lanes, but i do need to do a bit of gym work, my arms where extremely pumped after the weekend, but having some folks to go ride out with would be cool as i have no idea wether i should be nailing it along the tracks or just trundling and admiring the countryside, i will be putting the xt 550 through it all though instead of the tenere, i can reach the floor properly on that one.

Thanks for the reply, HD riders arent that bad, i always get a nod from back patch riders but not the individuals who are just reliving the youth,lol
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Old 09-02-2012, 03:31 AM   #3647
yamahaman
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Don't go to the gym for arm pump

If your going to the gym to try to reduce arm pump it can make it worse! If you do go do lots of lightly weighted high rep work outs. Don't think that pumping heavy weights to make bigger muscles will make it better, wrong, it makes it worse. The best way to get rid of arm pump it to do it on the bike, relax your grip at every opportunity this will take you consciously telling yourself to do it.

After a while of riding and putting yourself into a position of getting arm pump, one, your body will develope it's muscle groups required to handle your bike and two, your mind will become subconsciously tuned to relaxing your grip when required also reducing arm pump.

Time on the bike is the best gym to exercise in to get fit for any long ride or race. I used to get horrible arm pump when I started to race enduros and a pro rider I used to ride with and get a bit of coaching from gave me this advice and it has been some of the best yet

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Old 09-02-2012, 08:41 AM   #3648
furylow
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Hi to everybody!
I'm a bloody newbie on this forum, Im Pablo from Spain, and I'm repairing a Yam XT600 model 2kj as my first road bike (I have a duc st3s for road use)

I would like to ask you if any of you has the workshop manual of the Yam xt 600 2KJ version. I have the carburettor colapsed and need to now jet sizes,etc etc...

Thank you in advance!!!
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Old 09-02-2012, 06:08 PM   #3649
SmokeyB
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Wicked Welcome

Furylow,

You can find the service manuals here:
http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/yamaha-tech/

Best of luck.
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Old 09-04-2012, 06:41 AM   #3650
xtscruff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yamahaman View Post
If your going to the gym to try to reduce arm pump it can make it worse! If you do go do lots of lightly weighted high rep work outs. Don't think that pumping heavy weights to make bigger muscles will make it better, wrong, it makes it worse. The best way to get rid of arm pump it to do it on the bike, relax your grip at every opportunity this will take you consciously telling yourself to do it.

After a while of riding and putting yourself into a position of getting arm pump, one, your body will develope it's muscle groups required to handle your bike and two, your mind will become subconsciously tuned to relaxing your grip when required also reducing arm pump.

Time on the bike is the best gym to exercise in to get fit for any long ride or race. I used to get horrible arm pump when I started to race enduros and a pro rider I used to ride with and get a bit of coaching from gave me this advice and it has been some of the best yet

thanks for the advice, it hasnt been as noticeable lately must be getting a bit fitter, i havent got time to go the gym, biking takes up as much time as possible, cheers
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Old 09-04-2012, 03:34 PM   #3651
pappito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by furylow View Post
Hi to everybody!
I'm a bloody newbie on this forum, Im Pablo from Spain, and I'm repairing a Yam XT600 model 2kj as my first road bike (I have a duc st3s for road use)

I would like to ask you if any of you has the workshop manual of the Yam xt 600 2KJ version. I have the carburettor colapsed and need to now jet sizes,etc etc...

Thank you in advance!!!
Hola Pablo.

Good luck with the bike, you should share some pics w/ us
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Old 09-04-2012, 03:44 PM   #3652
pappito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtscruff View Post
thanks for the advice, it hasnt been as noticeable lately must be getting a bit fitter, i havent got time to go the gym, biking takes up as much time as possible, cheers
that is a good advice, usually the pumped muscles are caused by a too strong grip. As the bike starts to dance, the rider, by instinct, tries to make a stronger grip - as a way of control. Unfortunately the stronger grip and stiff muscles won't help. The handlebar is for holding the throttle, signals, mirrors, etc, hardly for control the bike (except in really low speed)

Fitness is useful, but be more flexible is more helpful than getting big muscles. Big, stiff muscles and strong grip make the ride rather convulsive on loose terrain (sand, runny mud). You have to train yourself to loosen your grip and be more mind-driven than instinct-driven.

Lots of practice, but fortunately practicing means riding

You'll see the difference in couple of weeks and if you do want to lift weight - your bike is at least 170kg :)

Cheers,
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:24 PM   #3653
mr bones
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Got my blue slip yesterday & should be registered in the next week. Just ordered new progressive shock & springs. I'll do all new seals at the same time. Maybe a bit heavier oil to deal with the weight once I put some gear on the back.
I should be out getting dirty by November. Super


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Old 09-05-2012, 04:12 AM   #3654
xtscruff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pappito View Post
that is a good advice, usually the pumped muscles are caused by a too strong grip. As the bike starts to dance, the rider, by instinct, tries to make a stronger grip - as a way of control. Unfortunately the stronger grip and stiff muscles won't help. The handlebar is for holding the throttle, signals, mirrors, etc, hardly for control the bike (except in really low speed)

Fitness is useful, but be more flexible is more helpful than getting big muscles. Big, stiff muscles and strong grip make the ride rather convulsive on loose terrain (sand, runny mud). You have to train yourself to loosen your grip and be more mind-driven than instinct-driven.

Lots of practice, but fortunately practicing means riding

You'll see the difference in couple of weeks and if you do want to lift weight - your bike is at least 170kg :)

Cheers,
I dont grip the bars as if my life depended on it, i am quite relaxed and just guide the front of the bike, most of the lanes round my way are chewed to death by the 4x4 idiots (this isnt meant at all 4x4 offroaders, just the idiots i watched last weekend, they assume a byway is ploughing event ) who dont think about others using them.

I have traversed a few byways here, i have some farmland and wooded areas to ride but only at certain times of the year but the best thing about it is the tenere just goes anywhere i put it,the more i ride it, the more i am able to work it on the mud, its great fun, although the guy i got it from changed the sprocket size so its all top end, not so useful for plodding through almost tank deep trenches, but fun none the less.
Again thanks for the advice, its all good and its good to be amongst people who are helpful, thanks
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Old 09-05-2012, 03:20 PM   #3655
mr bones
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Any idea if a 95 XT 600 or later tank can be fitted to A 92 model. I've heard you can along with changing the seat. Anybody tried succseeded, failed with this mod. There seemed to be no larger tanks left for the 92 model 600.

Cheers.
Mr B
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Old 09-05-2012, 05:05 PM   #3656
Zombie_Stomp
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Tool kit

What's in everybody's XT600 tool kit? I'm picking out tools piece by piece to make an everything-but-a-rebuild kit for extended traveels. That means air filter, spark plug, hand controls/cables, tire change, oil change, bulbs, misc. electrical.

Who's done extended travels, and has a set of tools just for that?

Right now I'm looking for specific fastener sizes to buy wrenches for. The size and type of allen (socket type, long vs. short, regular 90 degree angle), socket sizes (18mm deep thin walled socket I plan to get for the spark plug, 22mm for the axle nuts, etc.) Adjustable wrench is on the list, one fits the axle bolts. Tire irons are on the list. Know where to get the good smaller ones?

I am avoiding buying whole sets since I usually end up not using half the set.
What are your 'must-have', "couldn't have changed X part without it", and frequently-used XT tools?
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Old 09-05-2012, 07:52 PM   #3657
snofrog
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when moving on from the xt is it better to sell or part ? mine has some nice aftermarket stuff
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:32 AM   #3658
vudu
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Hey Zombie,

I prefer the longer alloy tyre (tire) levers. Nothing worst that struggling to change a tyre on a hot day and lacking leverage.

Hey Snowy,

Depends. What hot parts have you got? PM me. Don't tell the others.
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Old 09-06-2012, 04:33 AM   #3659
snofrog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vudu View Post
Hey Zombie,

I prefer the longer alloy tyre (tire) levers. Nothing worst that struggling to change a tyre on a hot day and lacking leverage.

Hey Snowy,

Depends. What hot parts have you got? PM me. Don't tell the others.
Lol a freshly rebuilt works shock and acerbis tank
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Old 09-06-2012, 11:06 AM   #3660
vudu
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Have an Acerbis. Tell me about the shock please. What weigh is it built for? Components? Race hard or off road comfy? $?
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