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Old 02-02-2007, 12:29 AM   #31
Beezer
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Maybe a side note but here's what kills you the quickest in the wilderness if you don't have it (in order): First aid, shelter, water, food. An arguement could be made that water moves up one notch in a pure desert environment.
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Old 02-02-2007, 04:17 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doghouse_Riley

The next thing I plan on trying is a coke can stove so I can retire my MSR Whisperlight.
Could you tell me a little more about this? It seems that a lot of people are "kind" enough to leave "stoves" wherever one could possibly need one. Do you just fill it with gas and go?
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Old 02-02-2007, 05:01 AM   #33
rokklym
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doghouse_Riley

The next thing I plan on trying is a coke can stove so I can retire my MSR Whisperlight.
Have you ever used one of these? They are pretty cool! I was at a mountaineering class last fall and they made some, but I showed up late and didn't want to hold them up, so I didn't make one myself.

Here is what is says on Wikpedia:
A beverage-can stove is a homemade, ultra-light portable stove. The simple design is made entirely from cans (typically soft drink or beer cans) and burns alcohol (typically denatured). Countless variations on the basic design exist. Pepsi-brand aluminum cans are often used because they have a bottom shape that lends itself to securing the stove's inner wall, and because of this the stoves are sometimes called Pepsi-can stoves. The stove weighs 0.4 oz (10 g) and will boil two cups of water in five minutes with two tablespoons of fuel. Total weight, including a windscreen/stand can be less than one ounce (30 g). Due to the low weight compared to some commercial stoves, backpackers can reduce some pack weight with this stove, which makes this design popular among ultralight backpackers. This advantage may be lost or reduced on hiking trips that feature longer gaps between resupply stops, however, because the stove is less efficient and requires more fuel than alternatives such as Esbit tabs, especially when cooking for more than one person.

Link: includes instructions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soda_can_stove

My snowpeak gigapower setup is so small that I think I'll use that most of the time though.

Soda can stove:


Snowpeak stove: everything fits in the cup
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rokklym screwed with this post 02-02-2007 at 05:08 AM
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Old 02-02-2007, 05:06 AM   #34
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Well I've learned alot over the last several years as the number of times I camp per year has gone up along with the dificulty rating of the trails we drive while camping... If I knew how to post several pictures in the same thread I could show you a little. I'll get my packlist as well...
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Old 02-02-2007, 06:18 AM   #35
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I pack pretty light for my camping trips. I usually just take a credit card.

Just kidding. The Hennessey Hammock for warmish weather or for cold climates the blackdiamond mega lite tent. I have a couple of diffrent bags depending on tempture. My last camping trip (non motorcycle) I took a queen size inflateable bed and threw a pad on top for insulation. My buddy in the tent next to me had a hard time sleeping from my snoring.
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Old 02-02-2007, 09:44 AM   #36
d2wing
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I use a small Eureka backpacker tent, a Therma-rest pad, a sleeping bag with a stuff sack, inflatable pillow and a tripod folding stool. All this fits in a
bag that goes into my trunk or can be tied on depending on where I'm going and what else I bring. I like to bring firestarters, little chemical heaters and poly long johns for cold nights. Wetwipes are great if you need to clean up without water. Another thing is to bring old undies and toss 'em instead of washing. Buy new as you go if you need to.
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Old 02-02-2007, 06:37 PM   #37
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Guys all great suggestions. I actually bought a pepsi can stove for 4.00 and its riveted to add some strength. about all I plan on doing with it is heating up some precooked food and some coffee in the morning. The sleeping bag thing is very much known to me and I have frozen my tail off before. I always use one rated at least 15 degrees F. below the coldest I expect. I am going with a candle lantern to save some weight and lexan utensils. I need one small pot or cup really would be good enough. I cant wait to try it out.
How about wildlife at night? I know there are black bears, pigs, rattlesnakes and then all the usual critters. I have a small boat airhorn that I figured would scare the bears away if the come snooping and I dont plan to have any food in my tent and certainly none that is not prepackaged regardless. The main meal will be long gone by that point with no remnants.
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Old 02-02-2007, 09:40 PM   #38
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My philosophy on wildlife is I leave them alone and they leave me alone. Works here in the west anyway. The exeption is black bears. I bear bag my food and toiletries. I've thought about getting an ursack: http://www.ursack.com/
Also, when the weather is warm I'm more vigilant about watching for rattlesnakes when I'm hiking. I've come close to accidently stepping on a rattler a couple times when they're sunning themselves on the trail I was hiking on.
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Old 02-02-2007, 10:43 PM   #39
Johnny KLR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapiti
That's when you carefully select a rock from the fire, wrap it in your shittiest garment, so it doesn't melt your bag, and warm your toes back up.



...Or there's that cowboy movie technique

Yup
Better yet...

not so carefully select all the rocks from around the fire, put them in a very shallow pit about the size of your bag and put dirt back over them. Lay bag on top of dirt, and enjoy a heated bed.
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Old 02-02-2007, 10:53 PM   #40
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Old 02-02-2007, 11:09 PM   #41
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The Ray Way. http://www.rayjardine.com/

Ray Jardine has been camping for a long time. He has through hiked most of the big trails in the US. He also climbs. Ever seen the little cam things that climbers use to anchor into a crack? He invented those... When guys are climbing mountains there are a few ways to do it. Base camps all the way up. (get so far, make a camp, leave the heavy stuff and start early in the morning for the summit.) or Alpine climbing. (No intermediate camps. get as far as you can, and stop for the night.) Alpine climbing means you take it all with you. (and the less stuff the better.)

Most of the weight and bulk is from three things. Bag, tent, and pack. Some packs weigh 5 or 6 pounds. This is needed for 50 pounds of crap... A quilt is better than a bag. The insulation is no good under you. The loft is gone as your ass compresses it. You are better off with a mat or pad. Better yet a piece of plastic or Tyvek on fresh ground that is not hard and flat from repeated driving walking or camping. Most of the outdoors is soft. Next thing is your tent. 5 pounds of weight to keep the rain and bugs off. Get a net for your head (or all of you) and a silicone impregnated nylon tarp (ny-sil)

I use an army poncho, (bottom layer) light sleeping bag, and a one pound tarp. (when I'm not using a small tent or a hammock) when I want the lightest set-up. This is mostly when I am Hiking.

Coke can stoves are great. There are dozens of plans on-line. Seal them well (JB weld) and don't use gasoline. Weight is half an ounce. Have one pot to cook in and a small plastic cup. plastic spoon and you're good to go.

Here are some other tips:

Water bottles or soda bottles are lighter than a canteen.
Do you need three flashlights?
A small knife will do anything that needs done.
Bring a couple od asprin and a few bandaids, not the whole bottle.
Tape some strips of ducktape to the flap of your bag, or on the tank, instead of a whole roll.
Nylon shirts clean easy, and are dry by morning. Bring fewer clothes.
Consider having some items shipped to where you are going. No need to take a camp chair 800 miles, only to use it at the camp.

Emma "Grandma" Gatewood hiked the Appilation trail (three times) with a shower curtain for a tent, and carried all her stuff in a homemade sack balanced on her shoulder. She wore Keds sneakers. She was in her Sixties. Best quote:"Most people are patywaists."

Bottom line is; instead of using lighter stuff, use less stuff.

Eustace Conway is my Hero. Look him up yourself...
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Old 02-03-2007, 04:44 AM   #42
Doghouse_Riley
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http://www.thru-hiker.com/
I'm not affiliated in any way. They have some kits for diy ultralight camping equipment. They're also a good source for some hard too find materials like sylnylon (great for making ultralight tarps).
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Old 02-03-2007, 06:19 AM   #43
RT jim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doghouse_Riley
My philosophy on wildlife is I leave them alone and they leave me alone. Works here in the west anyway. The exeption is black bears. I bear bag my food and toiletries. I've thought about getting an ursack: http://www.ursack.com/
Also, when the weather is warm I'm more vigilant about watching for rattlesnakes when I'm hiking. I've come close to accidently stepping on a rattler a couple times when they're sunning themselves on the trail I was hiking on.
Funny ad. for Ursack. Bear don't eat what's inside . But sure must be smashed enough to make soup.
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Old 02-03-2007, 10:03 AM   #44
LaOutbackTrail
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This is my light gear. Most of which i use when cyclecamping.
Yes everything i use fits in that little backpack.
I use the gray sleeping pad when hiking and stuff instead of the therma rest.
And I got the Lexan cup and bowl instead of my trusty old metal ones... cant heat them over the stove though.... the stove is super light too.. fuel canister and all.

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Old 02-03-2007, 10:14 AM   #45
crushingchestpain
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extreme lightweight, as in zero


Ride up, get off, but dont Valet park. Take hot shower: Camping at it's finest. I wonder what the poor people are doing tonight?
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