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Old 12-22-2010, 05:32 AM   #1666
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by road ranger View Post
The ability of a machine to use a shield gas depends on having a solonoid to control gas flow and the necessary tubing to the welding torch or spool gun. there are some mig machines that do not have the necessary parts to use a shield gas. All mig machines are capable of using fluxcore wire. I didn't google that particular machine to see what it is capable of , but that would be a good idea before hard money is spent, to make sure it will do what you expect it to do.
From the link, you did click on it right?

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Technical Details
  • Spool Gun welder that you can weld up to 20' away from the welder
  • Exclusive wire speed control from the Spool Gun
  • 4 heat settings on the welder
  • Fluxcore/MIG, Easily changes from Fluxcore wire to Gas shielded wire by moving 2 wires no tools required. You will need to purchase a MIG regulator.
  • Welds Steel, Stainless Steel, Aluminum and Cast Iron



Product Description

From the Manufacturer

This Clarke Spool Gun 120 volt welder uses a standard 120 outlet. This is ideal for welding in hard to reach places. The Clarke Spool Gun welder can weld up to 20 feet away from the welder and features a spool gun design that allows wire speed control at your finger tips. Fluxcoe/MIG welding can be done with a quick change of 2 wires. The MIG regulator is not included. This uses a 4" spool. You can weld Steel, Stainless Steel, Aluminum, and Cast Iron. This is fan colled for better performance Duty Cycle is 40% @ 60 Amps. 4 power settings on the welder.

Product Description

This portable and lightweight welder offers maximum mobility for use on ladders, under vehicles or on equipment. High-tech spool gun design allows precise wire speed control, even when 20 feet away from unit. Easily changes from fluxcore to gas shielded welding with optional regulator. Includes 200 Amp ground clamp and 1/2-lb. spool of .030 fluxcore wire. 2-year limited warranty; 10-year limited warranty on transformer. Volts: 120, Amps: 130, Duty Cycle: 40% @ 60 Amps, Mig Ready: No, requires optional regulator, Wire Feed Speed Control: Yes, Weldable Metals: Steel, stainless steel, and aluminum, Weld Thickness (in.): Up to 1/4in. steel, Regulator and Gas Hose Included: No, Shielding Gas Required: No, Cart: No
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:05 AM   #1667
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
From the link, you did click on it right?



Jim
120 volt makes it more of a toy than something actually useful.
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:34 AM   #1668
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I will tell you the truth, if you cannot handle 90% of home and small projects, even larger ones with some effort with a 110v welder, I would not trust you with a 220v unit. Sorry, but that's the truth!

220v makes it easier, not possible.
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:52 AM   #1669
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A $89 120V HF flux welder suits my needs just fine. All I need is to weld steel 3/16" thick or less. The portability of it is great since a 200 outlet isn't necessary.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:30 AM   #1670
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Originally Posted by perterra View Post
I'd steer clear of it. With a 40% duty cycle at 60 amps, your probably going to be in the 5% or 10% duty cycle range at 100 amps. Depending if its a EU duty cycle which I think is 5 minutes instead of 10 you may get 30 seconds of weld time before you exceed the duty cycle. Save your bucks and pick up a Miller, Lincoln, ESAB or Hobart. With no more power than it's got you likely wont be able to use anything but CO2.
I think this is the info I'm looking for. I want a unit I can learn on, then get to work on some projects I've been longing to complete. I don't see myself doing any structural type welding, like motor mounts and the like.

I don't have 220 presently, but this is an option, since my electric service panel is at the garage. Based on the above info, the front runner is the lincoln 140T since it seems to deliver the most bang for the buck and would allow the use of spool gun for aluminum at the lowest cost.
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:42 PM   #1671
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hahmule View Post
I think this is the info I'm looking for. I want a unit I can learn on, then get to work on some projects I've been longing to complete. I don't see myself doing any structural type welding, like motor mounts and the like.

I don't have 220 presently, but this is an option, since my electric service panel is at the garage. Based on the above info, the front runner is the lincoln 140T since it seems to deliver the most bang for the buck and would allow the use of spool gun for aluminum at the lowest cost.

That would be the way to go, like the other poster said, 220 makes it easier, especially on aluminum. 220 seems to give you a real good hit on aluminum that is somethimes lacking with 110 units. I've been out of it for a couple of years now but there are some of the higher end home owner type machines with the ability to run anything from about 90 volts up. You can do a whole lot with a good 110 machine.

The smaller units with spoolguns for aluminum dont always have a gas solinoid built in to the machine but some times have a simple manual valve built in to the trigger of the gun. Pull the trigger, it opens the valve.

CO2 is going to give you the best penetration on limited amp machines for MIG, weld not so pretty but it will be stuck together.

Remember that MIG is only gas shielded, short for GMAW. gas metal arc welding, flux core is FCAW, flux cored arc welding.

If you get a 140 a mixed gas like 75% argon 25% CO2 will work great. If you get a 100 amp machine and want shielding gas CO2 is really the better option.
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:59 PM   #1672
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Do you think my girlfriend and I plan a spring or summer welding?
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Old 12-22-2010, 01:59 PM   #1673
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf View Post
I will tell you the truth, if you cannot handle 90% of home and small projects, even larger ones with some effort with a 110v welder, I would not trust you with a 220v unit. Sorry, but that's the truth!

220v makes it easier, not possible.

This



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Old 12-22-2010, 02:16 PM   #1674
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf View Post
I will tell you the truth, if you cannot handle 90% of home and small projects, even larger ones with some effort with a 110v welder, I would not trust you with a 220v unit. Sorry, but that's the truth!

220v makes it easier, not possible.
I didn't say that 220 makes anything easier. All I did was state my opinion of 120v welders. If you think attacking me makes you all knowelegable in the world of welding, then have at it, but it is obvious that you have never used a 'real' welding machine.
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Old 12-22-2010, 02:43 PM   #1675
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I'm pretty sure tundrawolf was speaking generally RR. I think you're mistaken taking it personally.



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Old 12-23-2010, 06:25 AM   #1676
JimVonBaden
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Originally Posted by hugemoth View Post
A $89 120V HF flux welder suits my needs just fine. All I need is to weld steel 3/16" thick or less. The portability of it is great since a 200 outlet isn't necessary.

This is what I use, and so far has been fine. I have welded as long as two straight minutes with it on 1/4" steel. It works fine for casual welding needs.





Not the prettiest welds, but I am new at it.

I turned this:



Into this:



I should have sprung for different, non-perforated, angle iron. But it is very strong and works great!

Jim
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Old 12-23-2010, 06:40 AM   #1677
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It does take some practice but I can now get very nice welds with the >$100 HF welder. So far I've built hand rails, trailers, camper frame, exhaust systems, and all sorts of other things. All this with a the 110V flux welder running off solar power.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
This is what I use, and so far has been fine. I have welded as long as two straight minutes with it on 1/4" steel. It works fine for casual welding needs.





Not the prettiest welds, but I am new at it.

I turned this:



Into this:



I should have sprung for different, non-perforated, angle iron. But it is very strong and works great!

Jim
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Old 12-24-2010, 06:09 AM   #1678
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X2, I have built a lot of stuff with a 110v welder. From roll cages, store fixtures, to a metal bar (seen below)



You just need to learn it's limitations and plan around it. Take the money you would have spent on a larger welder and buy a gas cutting/brazing setup.

When you have a piece that you think might be too thick or heavy for the little welder, you can preheat with the torch. It will make welding the heavy stuff a lot easier.
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Old 12-24-2010, 07:31 AM   #1679
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Originally Posted by road ranger View Post
I didn't say that 220 makes anything easier. All I did was state my opinion of 120v welders. If you think attacking me makes you all knowelegable in the world of welding, then have at it, but it is obvious that you have never used a 'real' welding machine.
I wasn't attacking anyone, my intention was to tell the man buying the 110v rig that he was OK in doing so. I went to college to learn to weld, and I would hope you would understand that for the majority of home repairs and manufacturing projects, duty cycle aside, a 110v welder will work fine.
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Old 12-24-2010, 03:49 PM   #1680
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The 110/220V MIG welder debate is almost as good as an oil thread. Well, maybe only as good as a tire thread. Just kidding.

I'll throw in some of what little bit I've learned going with a decent quality 110V MIG machine.

Wow, it's been something like 12 years since I did some online studying and real world shopping and ended up with a Hobart Handler 120. It has the OXO Piecemaker (or is it Peacemaker?) gun which I really like the quality of. BTW, Miller, Hobart, and one other label(brain fart, sorry) are all part of the ITW group and because of corporate moves to be more efficient here and there several of the Miller and Hobart machines will share many common parts and be built on the same production lines. So you basically have Big Blue and its cousins and Big Red as the leaders in the industry. I have no preference for either.

Buy or rent gas bottles? The closest welding supply store to me sells rather than rents C25 bottles. The cool thing is though, they just swap for a full one even though you've "bought" it, so you never have to worry about running past a hydro date on the bottle.(This vendor started as a Holox dealer then was bought out by Airgas just for reference) The downside for me is that due to my space constraints and the desire to have more portability I bought a 40 cu ft bottle. It costs basically the same for refills for 40 or 80 cu ft. I may upgrade to the bigger bottle after some garage rearrangements, I dont' know yet.

A good quality 110V MIG will be very good at really thin stuff if it is a model with a good reputation for having a "soft" arc that is easy to control across the lower voltage and current settings. At the other end, it will do way more than it is rated for if you do two things - 1) learn how to ensure you are getting good penetration instead of just gobbing more metal onto the puddle; 2) learn lots of helpful tricks like preheating some types of metals or larger workpieces, or some of the other tricks of the trade. Like multipass welds, instead of just feeding wire into a big joint with little penetration.

I won't get into any prideful things I've done with mine, but I will relate something I read about when I was hanging out on sci.engr.joining.welding and teaching myself. Lots of pros were hanging out on that newsgroup back then and sharing neat stuff. One of the regulars on there was both a custom fabricator and regular community college welding teacher up in the Pacific Northwet where there is probably more than a little shipbuilding and metal fabbing industry. One of the teaching jobs he held for a while had Hobart 120 Handlers for the welding lab. On a bet or dare, he used one of the Handler 120s to butt weld two coupons of 1" thick stock together and then put them through a 180 deg bending test. I can't remember how long it took to do this, nor how much wire, nor any other tricks like preheat. But bottom line, the coupon passed the test. And he is a top notch weldor which helps a lot. (Yes, its spelled that way for the person).

Now having bragged about what 110V MIGs can possibly accomplish with the right skills and right tricks...

They cannot: weld aluminum with any dependable satisfactory results. They cannot go from short-circuit mode into spray-transfer mode. You are looking for way above 250 amps maybe 400 amps to do that reliably. But that is BIG job stuff. And as I found out while enlarging my utility trailer built of 3/16 stock, they can't really weld overhead except maybe thin sheet stock. It was sure fun rotating the trailer from right side up to sitting on the tailgate, to upside down and back to get all the welds done satisfactorily.


I have welded as thick as 1/4" steel with careful prep, bevelling, cleaning etc. and multipass. And having to cut those pieces apart several years later, they were sound welds. So it can be done sometimes.

But for me, the typical home hobby weldor that mostly does sheet metal, 1/8, and 3/16 stock, the quality 110v MIG works well.

And like someone mentioned above, I soon augmented my setup with an OA cutting/welding outfit which gives me the ability to do lots more stuff than I even have time for. And the ability to braze too, which I haven't even gotten around to learning yet.

Anyway, that's my .02 worth from a typical home hobbyist that has lots of motorcycle stuff to work on, and some car and Jeep stuff as well. (Read: custom tool making and patch panels.)
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