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Old 02-25-2011, 10:47 AM   #1801
Shuffler
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don't have room for a rolling table in my present garage...had to get a folding table (Strong Hand 'Nomad' welding table)...but that is an idea I had for the next garage where I'll have more dedicated space....a bigger, better welding table. Those Miller Arcstations are pretty, but very cost-prohibitive.
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Old 03-02-2011, 07:28 AM   #1802
Old_Lion
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Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
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Welding makes me feel self-reliant

Firstly, thanks to KTM640Dakar for starting this thread and all the others for their input.
It took me several days to read it all. Yes I did!
It brought me up to date.
I even discovered my friend Dan (gsweave) making a case for Blue Max rods.
================================================== =

About 50 years ago I attended a welding course in Northern New Jersey at
a vocational school for six evening sessions.

Funny thing happened. Even though as a dairy farmer I should have
bought a welder after that, I did not.

The instructor may have been too zealous about impressing on his students how
very important it was to always lay down perfect welds.

I decided that if it was that critical I better leave it to the experts.
There was a welding shop within a mile from my farm.

In 1969 we moved our dairy operation to upstate New York.
Again there was a welding shop within a mile of the farm.

Then a few years later my cousin who was a shipboard welder came vacationing for a week.

"What's this? You don't have a welder?"
"You took a course?"

So we went down to Valley Welding in Binghamton, NY and bought a Lincoln AC welder.

I can't remember why I bought an AC welder and not an AC/DC unit.
Probably cost. I am frugal (more like cheap).
I bought a Lincoln because I liked the company for its treatment of the employees.

In retrospect buying that AC box was one of the best and most enjoyable investments I ever made.
I did not shortchange myself by not having DC because farm welding rarely involves thin materials.
BTW many years earlier I had bought an Acetylene-Oxygen outfit with AO Smith tips and torch.
It took care of tubing on hay elevators etc. and cutting and trimming.

I really like welding and I have a very steady hand.
Owning a welder saved me a lot of money on repairs.
I used 6011 rods mostly.
Also did hard surfacing of plow bottom edges.
Do not remember the rod type.

The A/O outfit has given me the most satisfaction. Probably because I have a tactile orientation.
I like working with my hands.
This makes me think that I would like TIG welding but I can't see any application for it.

I do like fresh air and try to minimize inhaling welding fumes so that is not an option.

We had left the scrap pile in the woods in New Jersey. It is still there.

After a few years we had another scrap pile at the current location.
Manure spreader slats, barn cleaner pedals, plow bottoms and shares, harrow tines etc.

The AC box at hand facillitated creating "found art". Much of it went to friends and family.
They liked it and I loved welding the stuff.

I quit milking cows in 1997. Since then I have not done much welding because I took a job
off the farm for another ten years.

After plowing through this thread I conclude that I should have had a rod oven/box.
Did not even know such a thing existed until I read this thread.
If a refrigerator with an incandescent light bulb can do the job I should build one? (QUESTION)

I am definitely going to buy a new helmet with auto-shading/darkening.
Since my welding always takes place outside the garage/workshop,
which is located at the road, it should be one with outlandish graphics.
This will give the neighbors driving by something to talk about.

When I purchased the AC unit I had the local electrician install a 220V outlet on the inside
of the post between the first and second overhead doors.
The welder was suspended from the rafters right behind the doorpost.
In hindsight this was probably a good thing because it still looks good.

I built a welding table with vise which is located right behind the second overhead door
close to and below the suspended welder.
Small pieces of scrap like angle iron and tubing (mostly square) are on the shelf below the tabletop.
The tabletop and the storage shelf were built from old rusty diamond plate that once covered the gutters in the barn.
(Gotta love 6011 rods).
Some pipe attached to the legs for rod holders (while working) as well as holders for slag hammers and brushes.
Keeps the table tidy.

Last year I built a trailer from scrap.



The jack came from an old hay baler. The whole thing sort of evolved from the scrap pile.
The bracket up front is a vestigial part of the evolutionary process.
It serves no particular purposes other then tying down a long ladder.
Initially I intended securing a front wheel with it.
I changed my mind after a friend made me aware of this gizmo
http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-chock-96349.html



Wiring is a Walmart kit.

Now, after reading this thread, I am thinking that I should own a MIG welder using Innershield rods.
Gas is not in the picture.
My farmer lungs have had enough exposure to adverse conditions.

I am scanning Craigslist for a used 110 volts Lincoln flux core MIG welder.
Why 110 volts when I have 220 outlet?

Portability yes portability.
Why this flux core welder?
"Found Art".
My juices are flowing again.
I am inspired by this thread and kirkster70's thread
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=625664

If I am unable to find a Lincoln I might consider wasting $119 on HF 90 amp unit.

George
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Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-02-2011 at 07:51 AM
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:35 PM   #1803
fxstbiluigi
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Old Lion:
6011 does not reqiure any special storage like 7018 does.
Keep it in an old refrig. if you like but do not heat the box.
Heating the box will cause the flux to deteriorate .
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:56 PM   #1804
Old_Lion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
Old Lion:
6011 does not require any special storage like 7018 does.
Keep it in an old refrig. if you like but do not heat the box.
Heating the box will cause the flux to deteriorate .
Thanks. I have always kept them in the tubes they used to come in.
Tin like lids.

George
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:13 PM   #1805
TwoBearBill
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Weld Pak 140

I bought a Lincoln Weld Pak 140 a couple of days ago, including the welder, bottle, helmet, and cart. It is 250 miles away, so tomorrow afternoon I'm riding my R100RT with sidecar to pick it up. We may have to disassemble the cart, but everything should fit. I'm a pretty good welder with my Lincoln 225, but I can't wait to try out the MIG. My first project is going to be mounting hardware for Touratech cases on my GS.
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:35 PM   #1806
Old_Lion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoBearBill View Post
I bought a Lincoln Weld Pak 140 a couple of days ago, including the welder, bottle, helmet, and cart. It is 250 miles away, so tomorrow afternoon I'm riding my R100RT with sidecar to pick it up. We may have to disassemble the cart, but everything should fit. I'm a pretty good welder with my Lincoln 225, but I can't wait to try out the MIG. My first project is going to be mounting hardware for Touratech cases on my GS.
I am watching as I type a "Ask This Old House" episode in which a segment shows creating/welding ornamental ironwork.
Mig unit tacking intricate designs. Something I would never be able to do with a stick welder. O/A would do it but that takes much more time.
MIG: pick up the torch, flip the switch, knod the helmet down.
Bingo!.
Nice.
Still scanning Craigslist.

George
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Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-03-2011 at 07:58 PM
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:43 PM   #1807
fxstbiluigi
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With a wire mach. ya don't even need a hood as long as yur just tackin' things, positon the torch, hold it still , close yur eyes, an pull the trigger, experience will tell you when to quit an be sure to use some good sun block on yur face.
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Old 03-04-2011, 07:32 AM   #1808
Pablo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post
I am watching as I type a "Ask This Old House" episode in which a segment shows creating/welding ornamental ironwork.
Mig unit tacking intricate designs. Something I would never be able to do with a stick welder. O/A would do it but that takes much more time.
MIG: pick up the torch, flip the switch, knod the helmet down.
Bingo!.
Nice.
Still scanning Craigslist.

George
I attached these cast pieces with a stick welder. I used nickel electrode for cast iron.





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Old 03-04-2011, 08:58 AM   #1809
rd1900
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Old Lion - Why no gas Mig? The gas is just inert shielding gas around the weld area, it won't affect your lungs at all. Please reconsider this, a gas Mig is much nicer than a messy, splattery flux core.

A get a decent automatic helmet, so much easier than flipping the shield up and down. I'm every bit the cheapskate, but sometimes spending a bit more makes a huge difference. Gas over flux core and auto-darkening are two such cases.
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Old 03-04-2011, 10:09 AM   #1810
Old_Lion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rd1900 View Post
Old Lion - Why no gas Mig? The gas is just inert shielding gas around the weld area, it won't affect your lungs at all. Please reconsider this, a gas Mig is much nicer than a messy, splattery flux core. A get a decent automatic helmet, so much easier than flipping the shield up and down. I'm every bit the cheapskate, but sometimes spending a bit more makes a huge difference. Gas over flux core and auto-darkening are two such cases.
Why not gas MIG?.
I am on a promontory 1300 feet elevation overlooking the valley 300 feet below, the land is on a plateau behind the farmstead.
No mosquitos because the wind or breeze blows all year, night and day.

My garage is chuck full with farm tools, etc
Room for only one motorbike.

I would need to use a separate welding shed with fancy ventilation setup
if I went with gas.

Besides I already fought my battle with AIRGAS about the monthly rentals.
They still owe me $160.00 for a deposit I made on bigger O/A bottles decades ago wich were returned in Sept. 1997.
I bought smaller bottles at that time.
These I just swap and pay cash to the welding shop one mile from home.
Which leaves me clear of them.

I agree that a better helmet would greatly improve striking an arc for stick welding.
You should see my helmet with the pitted glass.
It would give you a good laugh.
"You weld with that?"
Sheepishly:
"Yes I have sofar".
I am not proud.

Now tell me why I should have MIG gas instead of MIG fluxcore?
I need to convince myself that I can't live with splatter or am unable to
conquer splatter to an personally acceptable level.


Still looking for:
http://www.lincolnelectric.com/Catalog/equipmentdatasheet.aspx?p=42420

Power MIG® 140C 120/1/60
Combination Wire Feeder / MIG and Flux-Cored Welder
Product Number: K2471-1
Industrial Price: 664.00 (USD) (hoping to get that down somehow)
UNIT INCLUDES:
Magnum 100L welding gun (K530-6)
Six spare contact tips
Gas and gasless nozzles
Work cable and work clamp
Adjustable gas regulator and hose (for argon & Ar-blend gases)
.025-.030 and .035 smooth drive rolls
.030-.045 knurled drive roll
.025-.035 wire guide
2 lb. spool .025" Super Arc® L-56 wire
1 lb. spool .035" Innershield® NR-211-MP self-shielded flux-cored wire
8" spool spindle adapter
How to Use DVD.



If I wanted to go MIG Gas I would have that option.
In the event that AIRGAS ever sends me my money I will be a little closer to purchase.

George
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Old 03-04-2011, 10:15 AM   #1811
Old_Lion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pablo83 View Post
I attached these cast pieces with a stick welder. I used nickel electrode for cast iron.

Absolutely beautiful. I love looking at it.
How did you come buy these cast iron pieces?
You see why I need a better helmet?

George
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Old 03-04-2011, 01:41 PM   #1812
Pablo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post
Absolutely beautiful.

How did you come buy these cast iron pieces?
Thanks. I was living in Salt Lake at the time and there was a great metal supplier (Wasatch Metal) that carried a nice selection of cast iron. I haven't found a good supplier since. If anyone knows of a good online store that has a nice selection of decorative iron, I'd love to check them out.
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Old 03-04-2011, 02:55 PM   #1813
rd1900
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post
Why not gas MIG?.

I would need to use a separate welding shed with fancy ventilation setup
if I went with gas.
I don't understand why you would need this for MIG with gas. To stay out of the wind? The gas for MIG is carbon dioxide/argon, and in very small amounts. This is completely harmless to humans (other than suffocation!). The ozone created by the welding is far more troubling than the shielding gas could possible be.

As for the tank problem - I'm not familiar with monthly leases. Here you either own a small tank or lease a bigger tank with a one time payment. The easy solution would be to find a used tank on CL and buy it, they you just swap when you need a refill. I've used Linde, Airgas, local guy, none of them seem to care what the tank says on it.

Does your local welding shop sell machines? Do they have any you can try out? I know Linde and Airgas will let you do that. Try the flux core and then the gas MIG, you can decide for yourself. I've never welded with a stick, only gas MIG and TIG, so maybe coming from stick the flux core woudl not be such a big deal. But when I was forced to used a flux core machine after being used to gas MIG it was terrible.

And speaking of being cheap, I put hundred of pounds of wire through a cheap 120V Century MIG machine. No where near as nice as a Lincoln or Miller, and no where near as expensive, and I never had a weld fail.

Find a nice used machine, with a bottle included, use it and don't worry about fancy ventilation for the shielding gas, and I bet you would be quite happy.
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:19 PM   #1814
David R
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Laugh

HI Old Lion.

You can also run Co2 in those machines for a gas. it works well. That is how I welded on Cell towers on Calm days. Windy days I just used stick. Look up Miller Passport. It is a 180 amp mig welder with a 12 ounce paintball Co2 can inside the case. it will weld 25? minutes on a tank.

Pick up a small roll of flux core. You can run it on one of my machines. See how you like it.

Out riding the KLX for a long lunch.

David :)
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:27 PM   #1815
Old_Lion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
HI Old Lion.

You can also run Co2 in those machines for a gas. it works well. That is how I welded on Cell towers on Calm days. Windy days I just used stick. Look up Miller Passport. It is a 180 amp mig welder with a 12 ounce paintball Co2 can inside the case. it will weld 25? minutes on a tank. Pick up a small roll of flux core. You can run it on one of my machines. See how you like it. ut riding the KLX for a long lunch.
David :)
David,
I have been meaning to get up to your place some day when you are not out riding.
Thanks for the invitation.
George

Quote:
Originally Posted by rd1900 View Post
I don't understand why you would need this for MIG with gas. To stay out of the wind?.
Correct me if I am wrong.
It is my understanding that airflow/breeze/wind interferes with the gas that is shielding the arc of the weld in progress.
Be that argon75/co2 25, tri-mix, etc
Flux on a the outside of a stick/rod and flux inside a fluxcore wire performs the same function as "shielding gas" on a bare wire.

To protect the weld in progress from air movements I would have to find another location.
If you tell me that shielding the arc is not important I will take your word for it.
The main issue is shielding the arc, secondly avoiding fume-fever.

There is no way I can weld inside my garage.
Insufficient space and a fire hazard.
The first bay houses a tractor.
If rain forces me to weld indoors I have to move the tractor outdoors
and clean the floor first. Residue brought indoors on the tractor tires.

The garage is located about 40 feet from the house from which 3 overhead wires
provide the electrical power to the garage.
A farm shop bears no resemblance to a home garage.
Never made enough money to be able to afford a fancy bigger new building.
A pole building would have been nice.

Our cars and pickup truck are always parked outside summer and winter.
No room in the shop/garage.
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Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-05-2011 at 05:56 PM
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