ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-13-2011, 10:40 AM   #1846
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: In the TARDIS
Oddometer: 2,753
I have a set too and they work just fine. BTW: All Vise Grip brand tools are now made in China and have been since 2008.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RPD1 View Post
I've tried those, George. It's not worth the frustration.
hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 07:47 PM   #1847
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 3,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
I have found after many years if it does not say Vice Grip not to buy. Only for me. I have tried em all. Those self adjusting ones are cool for a couple of weeks, then they end up in the scrap bin. To each his own says the guy that owns all snap on tools. I still have the 3/8" drive S-K socket My dad gave me when I was 12. A good ground makes for trouble free good looking welds. David

I have S-K sockets. Never broke one in 40-50 years.
I sure reefed on them with the handles in pieces of pipe for extensions.
My ViseGrip vise grips are dear to me.
Have several sizes.
Figured the HF ones are good for a ground clamp.
I like the idea of a vise grip for a ground clamp.
Less area to clean as opposed to using a conventional clamp.

Link for Move to China: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26531610/ns/business-local_business/

Peterson sold out to Irwin, then Irwin sold it to Newell Rubbermaid which promptly moved manufacturing to China.

Gonna have to stop at garage sales.


George
__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.

Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-13-2011 at 08:01 PM
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 08:11 PM   #1848
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: In the TARDIS
Oddometer: 2,753
My ground clamp is a heavy duty solid copper clamp from a set of 1940s era jumper cables. They don't make'em like they used to.
hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 08:18 PM   #1849
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 3,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brownsvillian View Post
Whats the difference between a Lincoln 180c, 180t, and a 180HD or Pro 180. I understand that the 180 c/t is continous, versus tap, but what does that mean. THe HD and Pro 180 are retail welders, and are cheaper, are they worth buying, or am I going to regret not going to the store and spending a little more for the real deal?
http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/lincoln-power-mig.html

Quote:
"Large wire feeder motor provides plenty of torque for recommended wire sizes and industrial closed design is much more resistant to grinding dust than cheaper retail type units.
"

As David stated "HD" is Home Depot. Pro is Lowes.

George
__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 07:39 AM   #1850
DirtyOldMan
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Banjoland
Oddometer: 1,895
[QUOTE

Thanks for the compliment dirtyoldman. Hit your vice with a grinder and look at the sparks. Short red sparks are cast Iron. Longer yellow sparks with tails are for cast steel which can be welded easier than cast Iron. If in doubt grind something you know what is to help you compare.

David[/QUOTE]


Thanks for the tip, that info will come in handy in the future. Unfortunately, I think it proved the vise to be cast iron. The sparks coming from it and another piece I believe to be cast iron were what I'd call orange in color. I hit a piece of tool steel and a mild steel bolt head for comparison. Both of those produced what I'd call white sparks.

So, if it is indeed cast iron, how would you recommend goimg about welding it.
Thanks
__________________
Sandy Jackson
04 250 RFS

13 650 Terra

96 R1100R
DirtyOldMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 09:40 AM   #1851
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,411
Laugh

Dirty old man,

I would preheat the vice to 800*f, stick weld with NI55, Peen after every pass and cool slowly. It may need to be re heated in the middle of welding or not depending on how much heat is put into the vice each pass. 1/8" rod run at 90 amps should do it. That stuff over twenty bucks a pound. Last cast iron job I did used 15 lbs of rod to weld 24 covers.

A grill with charcoal would be a nice way to preheat. I don't know if a gas grill will get it hot enough. Use a temp stick or one of those cool temp guns from Harbor Freight.

Running a miller passport today. The only Blue machine I own. Its pretty good.

David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 09:54 AM   #1852
KTM640Dakar OP
Motorsick
 
KTM640Dakar's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Oxbow Lake
Oddometer: 2,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post
Introduction to Metal-Cored Wire
http://www.thefabricator.com/article/consumables/an-introduction-to-metal-cored-wire#

Quote from:
http://weldingdesign.com/distributors/news/distributors-should-know-metal-cored-wires-0518/

" " "
Metal-cored wires are capable of welding through mill scale, dirt, oil, grease
and other debris while still producing quality welds, which eliminates
your customers’ need to grind materials before sending them to the weld
cell. And, because the wires produce little to no spatter, they eliminate
the need for pre-weld anti-spatter application or post-weld grinding, too.
As mentioned previously, they also offer faster travel speeds than other
wires and higher deposition rates. "
=====

From:
http://www.thefabricator.com/article/arcwelding/understanding-metal-cored-wire#

"
Metal-cored wire isn't suitable for all welding, but used in appropriate applications,
the wire can help improve quality and reduce rework.
Some industries best-suited to using metal-cored wire are automotive exhaust and
chassis manufacturing, agricultural and heavy equipment manufacturing, and railcar fabrication.
This article discusses the wire's properties and how to determine if it is suitable for your operation.
=====
Additional Links:

http://www.hobartbrothers.com/aboutus/part_one_metalcored_productivity/

http://www.hobartbrothers.com/aboutus/part_two_metalcored_productivity/




It seems to require CV (Constant Voltage).
Looking for the OP to chime in on this.

I would like to know which Lincoln Welders can handle this?

George
Hi George,

All MIG welders can run metal cored wires. Sometimes the only problem is that some metal cored wires are harder for manufacturers to draw down to a small diameter (below .035 or .045 diameter). The difference between a solid mig wire and metal cored wire is that a solid wire is solid and a metal cored wire is a jacketed wire that is hollow and filled with metal powder. All metal cored wires require that you use shielding gas. Unllike a fluxed cored wire that has gas producing compounds that allow you to weld without shielding gas (because those compounds burn and produce CO2 gas). We call the flux cored wires Innershield wires at Lincoln.
As far as welding travel speeds are concerned, there is some data that says you can go faster with metal cored wires. The problem is that for hand welding, most humans can't move their hand faster than say 20 inches per minute. A robot on the other hand can travel much faster and metal cored wires see more use on automated systems where you can take advantage of the faster travel speeds that robots can go. The other advantage of metal cored wire is that you can usually get bigger deposition rates. In other words you can weld more pounds of weld metal per hour with a metal cored with than with a solid wire (in most cases.)
A third type of wire is a metal cored wire with fluxing agents added. Another brand name of this type is called Ultracore wire. It has metal and flux in it but uses shielding gas as well. Usually 75/25 ArC02. The advantage of it is the ability to have high deposition rates and use the flux and slagging agent to clean the contaminants out of the parent metal. Things like rust and mill scale are contaminants that it will help you clean out then trap in the weld slag which is later removed like the slag that forms over a weld when using stick electrode.

However...........you should always weld on clean metal. Just because you have a wire that may help address these contaminants doesn't mean you can break the rules of AWS (American Welding Society makes the rules that we welders follow for best practices). In all cases of welding code you should never weld on rust, paint, mill scale, grease, (including any hydrocarbon) or any form of hydrogen producing contaminants, oil, water,etc. So when a manufacturer says you can do this they are kind of breaking their own rules. I am not saying that people don't do it every day and get away with it but they should use best practices and avoid it.

The last thing is the issue of spatter. Spatter is mostly a function of voltage and shielding gas. With a high argon gas (at least 85% argon) and a high enough voltage setting (say 25.5 volts) you can eliminate spatter. You also need to set your wire feed speed to use about 250 amperes minimum. This will give you a very hot arc called spray transfer that is spatter free. The down side is that the arc is so hot that you have trouble welding thin materials. With pulse welding MIG welders we have been able to lower the total heat input and go thinner. I don't feel that there is any advantage using metal cored wires verses solid MIG wires like Super Arc L-59 when it come to spatter reduction in hand held applications unless you are welding thick metal that is more than 1/2 of an inch thick.

Todd
__________________
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

It is not the destination, it's the journey.
KTM640Dakar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 10:04 AM   #1853
KTM640Dakar OP
Motorsick
 
KTM640Dakar's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Oxbow Lake
Oddometer: 2,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brownsvillian View Post
Whats the difference between a Lincoln 180c, 180t, and a 180HD or Pro 180.

I understand that the 180 c/t is continous, versus tap, but what does that mean.


THe HD and Pro 180 are retail welders, and are cheaper, are they worth buying, or am I going to regret not going to the store and spending a little more for the real deal?
The Home Depot machines have plastic drive housings and the Power MIG's have aluminum ones which are stronger. The tap verses continuous voltage control is also different. Continuous controls let you fine tune your voltage better, but tapped machines are less expensive to make.
__________________
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

It is not the destination, it's the journey.
KTM640Dakar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 06:03 PM   #1854
GSWayne
Old Guy nOOb
 
GSWayne's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Oddometer: 2,962
Non Standard Use for Welder

Will it hurt a welder to operate into a short circuit? I was thinking of using my ThermalArc ProWave 185TSW to test the current handling capability of some wire. I was planning on running DC current around 30 to 50 amps.
__________________
It isn't the conditions its the decisions

Don't bring a motorcycle to a car fight
GSWayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 06:10 PM   #1855
DirtyOldMan
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Banjoland
Oddometer: 1,895
Thanks David, looks like my mig's not gonna be the tool to use.
I've been wanting an old buzz box anyway.
__________________
Sandy Jackson
04 250 RFS

13 650 Terra

96 R1100R
DirtyOldMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 06:27 PM   #1856
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,411
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSWayne View Post
Will it hurt a welder to operate into a short circuit? I was thinking of using my ThermalArc ProWave 185TSW to test the current handling capability of some wire. I was planning on running DC current around 30 to 50 amps.
I have an Arcmaster 185. I DON'T THINK it will hurt it, I short it when I stick the rod to my work. Its not for long.

Perhaps you could put it in stick mode and use the foot pedal watching the amp meter on the machine.

David :)
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2011, 06:29 PM   #1857
Poolside
Syndicated
 
Poolside's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Long Beach, CA
Oddometer: 11,851

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post


Those are a little bit of a pile, in stock trim that is. The top jaw starts to 'rotate back' into the top handle, deforming the handle metal. When that happens the 'over-center' locking mechanism stops working.

Run a bead all the way around the top handle, where the top jaw slots in. If the jaw has already 'pushed back into the handle', relocate to its original position before welding.

Even after all that, they're still a bit of a pile. They are excellent to experiment with though.


__________________

IICE Air Hotrod your GS  Fuel Injection  Tech Info  Buy  Order List  Installation
Poolside is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2011, 06:01 PM   #1858
GSWayne
Old Guy nOOb
 
GSWayne's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Oddometer: 2,962
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
I have an Arcmaster 185. I DON'T THINK it will hurt it, I short it when I stick the rod to my work. Its not for long.

Perhaps you could put it in stick mode and use the foot pedal watching the amp meter on the machine.

David :)
I did the test. Ran 40 A for 5 minutes and then 50 A for 5 minutes. Unit didn't seem to mind. Per your suggestion ran DC in stick mode.
__________________
It isn't the conditions its the decisions

Don't bring a motorcycle to a car fight
GSWayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 01:32 PM   #1859
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 3,118
12 AWG vs 10 AWG

So I bought this Harbor Freight welder



90 amp MIG Flux Core Welder.

I look at the box and it states:
"Input Voltage 120 Volt 24 Amps"

Wait a minute!
I have 12 gauge wire leading to the outlet.

AWG 12 is rated for 20 amps. {Resistance Ohms 5.4/km (E=IxR)}

Do I have to rewire it with AWG 10/3?

George



Ref:http://www.builditsolar.com/Tools/wiretable2.htm

Manual: http://images.harborfreight.com/manuals/94000-94999/94056.pdf
__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.

Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-16-2011 at 02:08 PM
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 05:41 PM   #1860
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,411
Laugh

If you have 12 ga wire you are off to a good start. I would not be too worried yet. Run the machine and see. 24 amps are needed if you run it full tilt. Plugging it in right below the power panel makes for a short run from the breaker to the outlet which helps.

Look at the duty cycle at 90 welding amps. Its probably 10 or 20% on a 10 minute cycle.

This is good. Most 110 Volt Mig welders claim 120 to 140 welding amps. They cannot do it with out a 30 amp outlet which they do not make.

IN MY OPINION any 110 volt mig welder will put out about 90 amps AT reasonable MIG welding voltage. Do the math and figure efficiency in and you will see.

Old Lion, Every day you own a new welder with out using it is a sin.

Enjoy
David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014