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Old 05-16-2011, 02:18 PM   #2011
Strong Bad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
And you're sittn there trying to tell me and the rest of the world that simply because you haven't heard of or seen some different way of doing something that it is wrong or a waste of time ?
I know where you can find a lot of weldors that regularly make x-ray quality welds (have to thier job depends on it) and every one ofem is gonna clean the protective coating off of the fill wire.
I've had tons of welds inspected and x-rayed, I've even had inspectors watch me weld. I've personally never seen a spec that requires the removal of the coating or requiring non-coated rod and I've seen some outrageous specs. Most of us wipe the rod with a clean rag but not remove the copper. What industry and what application is it that has specs that say you need to do this pray tell? I'd love to know the details.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:25 PM   #2012
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Originally Posted by Strong Bad View Post
I've had tons of welds inspected and x-rayed, I've even had inspectors watch me weld. I've personally never seen a spec that requires the removal of the coating or requiring non-coated rod and I've seen some outrageous specs. Most of us wipe the rod with a clean rag but not remove the copper. What industry and what application is it that has specs that say you need to do this pray tell? I'd love to know the details.
No body said anything about specs tha require the removal of the protective coating.
It just makes things easier when you remove as many chances as you can for something to go wrong.
Personally I really don't care what you do with the fill wire, Me I'm gonna remove the coating. That if I was still working.
I retired two years ago after welding for 41 years.
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Old 05-16-2011, 06:15 PM   #2013
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Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
No body said anything about specs tha require the removal of the protective coating.
It just makes things easier when you remove as many chances as you can for something to go wrong.
Personally I really don't care what you do with the fill wire, Me I'm gonna remove the coating. That if I was still working.
I retired two years ago after welding for 41 years.
I never said it was wrong...waist of time? Perhaps. Been welding since 1970 & still a couple of years out from hanging it up (too many toys to accumulate yet). I would still like to know what industry and what you were welding that was so critical you felt the need to do this. You see, I've always felt that a good welder is always willing to learn, and there just might be a particular application where it would apply.
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Old 05-16-2011, 06:35 PM   #2014
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Originally Posted by Strong Bad View Post
I never said it was wrong...waist of time? Perhaps. Been welding since 1970 & still a couple of years out from hanging it up (too many toys to accumulate yet). I would still like to know what industry and what you were welding that was so critical you felt the need to do this. You see, I've always felt that a good welder is always willing to learn, and there just might be a particular application where it would apply.
Then whats with the snide remark on page 134 post #2010?
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Old 05-16-2011, 07:55 PM   #2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
No body said anything about specs tha require the removal of the protective coating.
It just makes things easier when you remove as many chances as you can for something to go wrong.
Personally I really don't care what you do with the fill wire, Me I'm gonna remove the coating. That if I was still working.
I retired two years ago after welding for 41 years.
You got me beat by 5 years, I have my own deal and have for about 20+, I dont remove the coating on steel wires, I do clean them with cleaner...mostly to get the potatochip oils off, I like to snack while I weld.

I also don't grind the chrome off a luggage rack on a motorcycle, I just weld that shit up and call it a day, tell the guy thanks and have a nice day.

Some days it seems people over think this welding stuff, it isn't RocketSurgery...it's welding, stone axe technology.

So what can you tell me about a Dynasty 700...??
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Old 05-16-2011, 08:30 PM   #2016
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Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
You got me beat by 5 years, I have my own deal and have for about 20+, I dont remove the coating on steel wires, I do clean them with cleaner...mostly to get the potatochip oils off, I like to snack while I weld.

I also don't grind the chrome off a luggage rack on a motorcycle, I just weld that shit up and call it a day, tell the guy thanks and have a nice day.

Some days it seems people over think this welding stuff, it isn't RocketSurgery...it's welding, stone axe technology.

So what can you tell me about a Dynasty 700...??
don't know anything about a dynasty 700.
depending on what you do, local welding shop that sees a lot of walk in, food processing, ect. can be really lax and propper procedure for an x-ray quality weld really isn't necessary because that level of quality isn't necessary. Food processing plants where every thing is either wet or greasy is a good example of JUST WELD THE DAMN THING.(stick the two pieces together).
Power Houses,be they coal fired or Nuc. , are another story where welding can make rocket science look simple. In a power house you can see steam pressures in excess of 1500 psi, hydraulic oil pressures around 4,000 psi. and piping that delivers hydrogen to the turbine/generator.
Welds that see that kind of pressure need to be done properly with no defects of any kind or they will fail, possibly causing injury or worse to anyone in the area, or damage to equipment or cause the plant to go off line at great expense to the owner.
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Old 05-17-2011, 06:27 AM   #2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
don't know anything about a dynasty 700.
depending on what you do, local welding shop that sees a lot of walk in, food processing, ect. can be really lax and propper procedure for an x-ray quality weld really isn't necessary because that level of quality isn't necessary. Food processing plants where every thing is either wet or greasy is a good example of JUST WELD THE DAMN THING.(stick the two pieces together).
Power Houses,be they coal fired or Nuc. , are another story where welding can make rocket science look simple. In a power house you can see steam pressures in excess of 1500 psi, hydraulic oil pressures around 4,000 psi. and piping that delivers hydrogen to the turbine/generator.
Welds that see that kind of pressure need to be done properly with no defects of any kind or they will fail, possibly causing injury or worse to anyone in the area, or damage to equipment or cause the plant to go off line at great expense to the owner.
I have done work for Crane Nuclear, Ball Aerospace, Rockwell Missile Systems, DataPath, Ziess Medical, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed, Panoz, as well as my neighbors lawnmowers and tractors...and welded on 4 or 5 of the quickest and fastest TopFuel Motorcycles in the world, so I may know a thing or two about what you are talking about...

If you ever get down South, stop by and I will let ya play on my 700, it is a real fun toy, runs circles around the Dynasty 300 and the SW350 LX, then you can step back in time and run the restored late 60's P&H Chemtron...:) Bi Plane to the SpaceShuttle..
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Old 05-17-2011, 09:57 AM   #2018
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Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
I have done work for Crane Nuclear, Ball Aerospace, Rockwell Missile Systems, DataPath, Ziess Medical, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed, Panoz, as well as my neighbors lawnmowers and tractors...and welded on 4 or 5 of the quickest and fastest TopFuel Motorcycles in the world, so I may know a thing or two about what you are talking about...

If you ever get down South, stop by and I will let ya play on my 700, it is a real fun toy, runs circles around the Dynasty 300 and the SW350 LX, then you can step back in time and run the restored late 60's P&H Chemtron...:) Bi Plane to the SpaceShuttle..
The Dynasty 700 is a sweet state of the art machine, the 300 has a short duty cycle (40%) and that sux. My favorite machine for waveform shaping was the Miller Aerowave, now long time discontinued.
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Old 05-17-2011, 11:08 AM   #2019
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The Dynasty 700 is a sweet state of the art machine, the 300 has a short duty cycle (40%) and that sux. My favorite machine for waveform shaping was the Miller Aerowave, now long time discontinued.
I had an AeroWave, great machine, however the 700 as a whole is a better machine, after the AW had a few board malfunctions it had to go..

I would like to find an old SW500 somewhere cheap..just to have..set it up back to back with the P&H..Antique TIG Welders
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Old 05-17-2011, 04:57 PM   #2020
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There's a Syncrowave 500 for sale by me for a grand. Comes with a Bernard water cooler.

Sounds like a great deal, but it looks like way too much of a machine for me. I don't think I could use it to it's full potential.

There's an XMT 304 for sale too. I wouldn't know where to even begin with that. Although the price makes it real tempting.


-darrell
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Old 05-21-2011, 09:42 AM   #2021
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There's a Syncrowave 500 for sale by me for a grand. Comes with a Bernard water cooler.

Sounds like a great deal, but it looks like way too much of a machine for me. I don't think I could use it to it's full potential.

There's an XMT 304 for sale too. I wouldn't know where to even begin with that. Although the price makes it real tempting.


-darrell

when it comes to machines i would usually rather have a machine capable of more than less that is what the controls are for

i have a Miller 330 A/BP in my shop, and one nice thing about having a 850lb machine is that no one has tried to steal it
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Old 05-21-2011, 07:35 PM   #2022
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Laugh

I have the opposite, Lincoln V350 pro. 425 amps, 100% duty cycle at 300 amps. Up to 45 volts on CV. 83 lbs. Welds SWEET.

Does pulsed spray mig with steel, nickel, metalcore stainless and aluminum. Pulse on pulse aluminum to make the dimes like tig.

David
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Old 05-22-2011, 09:17 AM   #2023
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Greetings gents and gentresses. I searched the tread and only found a couple of posts on this. I'm debating which welder to by for home/hobby use. I thinker with cars, bikes, and all sorts of home repairs. Also help out friends now and again so portable is nice. I want a general purpose MIG machine. I'm weighing the Lincoln 140C versus the Hobart 210MVP. Would get a spool gun in either case. Both options would run in the low $900 range and I'd like to keep this under a grand. I like the 115/220 ability of the Hobart and the wider range of use. I like the idea of the continuous voltage control of the Lincoln; although I haven't ever had that feature. I'm upgrading from a tired 110 off-brand machine from the early 1980's (Astropower) which actually held up pretty well for the price. My question is really how beneficial is the continuous voltage control? I can see where a pro welder wouldn't be without it, but me?. The Hobart only has only 4 tap settings for 115vac, and 3 more when connected to 220vac. I'm leaning toward the Hobart, just to cover more bases, but would love to hear some comments on the C part of the 140C. Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-22-2011, 10:53 AM   #2024
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Nightrunner. I would go for the 220 volt. Less limitations.

David
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:10 PM   #2025
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxstbiluigi View Post
[. Please explain for the folks out there why when welding 4130 (aka: Chromemoly), 316 stainless steel (Chrome & Nickle) is the rod of choice, rod NOT 4130.


I didn't say chrome would cause inclusions. I said it would alter the composition of the parent material.

Since 316 has a max. tensille strength just barely above the min. tensile for 4130 about the only reason I can think of for using 316 would be for corrosion resistance.
E70s2 is the recomended fill wire for 4130 and ER80-D2 can also be used.
The reason you don't use a 4130 filler to weld 4130 is because of the excessive amount of carbon in the metal. It is considered a medium carbon steel and it is advantageous to use a low carbon filler metal. If you don't you will increase the susceptibility of cracking. A good way to avoid this is to cool the weld metal as slowly as possible. That is why cast iron is so hard to weld because of the huge amount of carbon present.

Don't waste your time trying to remove the copper flash (coating) from the tig or mig wires. We put copper on it to keep it from rusting and in the case of mig wires to help with electrical conductivity to the contact tip in the mig gun. Stainless steels are stainless if they have a minimum of 8% chromium. Chrome helps resist corrosion by keeping the oxygen molecules from combining with the iron to form iron oxide or rust. Chrome is usually a good thing to have in your weld. Carbon is not alway a good thing but does help make the base metal stronger. You get the strength from moly and carbon in 4130 metal.
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