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Old 08-16-2007, 02:49 AM   #241
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
Since the welding only caused the slightest warpage in an area that is not easily seen, what is wrong with tinning the tank and then just laying a coat of zinc primer over that and call it a day before repraying? Can the tin job be a stand-alone process with no lead work? Or am I not grasping things?
You got it. The tinning does the sealing, similar to soldering a hole in a radiator.

Visualize a through hole circuit board, stuffed with parts, and awaiting solder. Every through hole in that circuit board, with a part in it or no, is a fairly large pin hole. And when the solder is applied, well, those holes are gas tight.

The tinning and leveling does the sealing. You can trowel on any additional lead filler to taste. If the surface is smooth enough after floating some solder on there, well then, you're done I'd say.

I think the typical zinc-rich primer, like for weld joints, isn't a proper base for durable automotive paint. Something to consider. The tinned areas are 'galvanized', so they won't be rusting anytime soon.


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Poolside screwed with this post 08-16-2007 at 02:57 AM
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Old 08-16-2007, 07:19 PM   #242
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
OK, the saga continues. My brother-in-law blows me off and decides to go to Spain for a few weeks and leaves me to my own devices...he did make a large patch with the proper rolled bead in case things didn't go well. After a couple of tries and a ton of grinding, my buddy and I get all the holes welded up. The first attempt we thought was OK...it wasn't. We weren't shy with the heat the second time and it took pretty darn well...thank you Lincoln.


So now, I've got to deal with the pin-holes, most of which I'm convinced are simlpy dimples after grinding . None-the-less, I've decided to try to lead them up. Eastwood has a kit with an instructional DVD. I'm already in over head. Who knows lead work? School me.

I'm off to fish out the slag.
Sorry Krampus I have never used lead to fill body work.

I do know that if you do plan to tin and lead it you will not be able to weld on the steel again with out removing all the tin and lead from the surface.

Lead and zinc make welds crack and cause porosity.

It looks like you did an really good job.
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Old 08-17-2007, 03:56 AM   #243
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I gotta say that this all this info kicks ass. Thank you KTM640Dakar for having this thread and the serving up the straight shit. Thanks to Poolside for enlightening and cautioning a noob.
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krampus screwed with this post 08-17-2007 at 04:04 AM
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Old 08-17-2007, 01:27 PM   #244
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
I gotta say that this all this info kicks ass. Thank you KTM640Dakar for having this thread and the serving up the straight shit. Thanks to Poolside for enlightening and cautioning a noob.
Your welcome Krampus! I enjoy helping my fellow motorheads.
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Old 08-22-2007, 10:11 PM   #245
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any word on when this welder becomes available?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
Wait a few weeks and the 300 Amp version will be out in the market. That will be the one to get. It will have all of the features of the 205T but will go to 350 amps.
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Old 08-26-2007, 05:46 AM   #246
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
OK, the saga continues. My brother-in-law blows me off and decides to go to Spain for a few weeks and leaves me to my own devices...he did make a large patch with the proper rolled bead in case things didn't go well. After a couple of tries and a ton of grinding, my buddy and I get all the holes welded up. The first attempt we thought was OK...it wasn't. We weren't shy with the heat the second time and it took pretty darn well...thank you Lincoln.


So now, I've got to deal with the pin-holes, most of which I'm convinced are simlpy dimples after grinding . None-the-less, I've decided to try to lead them up. Eastwood has a kit with an instructional DVD. I'm already in over head. Who knows lead work? School me.

I'm off to fish out the slag.
Advrider's very own Loctite factory rep checking in here to offer up my very own two bits of drivel.

Years back a salty old welder discovered a wicking grade threadlocker like 290 could fill pinholes created during the welding process.

Just heat the tank up to the point you still can touch the tank without burning yourself and liberally drip and wipe the 290 all over the affected area and let cool.

You could use 290 or AA Weld Sealant (which is virtually the same thing)

Capillary action draws either product into all of the pinhole voids and the tank will be sealed.

Dirty
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Old 08-28-2007, 10:04 AM   #247
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Tig

I read this thread a while back and decided to pick up a TIG welder. It's one of the small inverter welders that will run up to 200 amps with an air cooled Weldcraft torch. I've read everything I can get my hands on and I'm essentially teaching myself how to do it. I'm getting to the point where I can periodically lay a relatively clean bead down on mild steel but my beads are still pretty inconsistent and the bad sections still out number the good sections. I am running into a couple of things that seem to be limiting my progress though. One is that I seem to be consuming tungsten at a pretty rapid rate. I grind the 1.5 lanthanum tungsten to a point using a Sharpie hand held grinder that I picked up through Arc Zone. The point looks fine but within a couple of inches of bead, the tip seems to deteriorate. If I keep going, it eventually turns into a ball instead of a point. The gas flow looks Ok (20 CFM) even though I do get some smoke on the cup. The arc looks good until the tip starts to ball up. I think my distance is ok. The amperage I'm using appears to be within the range for the tungsten diameter I'm using. What would be your guess as to the problem?

Another question I have is concerning the technique for running the torch. Do good tig welders have the steady hands of a surgeon or are they just good a finding brace points for their hands? I mean keeping the tip an 1/8 to a 1/4 from the base metal, feeding the filler rod and operating foot switch requires a degree of skill that it appears will take a while to master. I've stuck the tip and contaminated the electrode with the filler rod a number of times when trying to free hand everything.
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Old 08-28-2007, 01:41 PM   #248
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
Advrider's very own Loctite factory rep checking in here to offer up my very own two bits of drivel.

Years back a salty old welder discovered a wicking grade threadlocker like 290 could fill pinholes created during the welding process.

Just heat the tank up to the point you still can touch the tank without burning yourself and liberally drip and wipe the 290 all over the affected area and let cool.

You could use 290 or AA Weld Sealant (which is virtually the same thing)

Capillary action draws either product into all of the pinhole voids and the tank will be sealed.

Dirty
No Shit? Dirty...That could very well be one of the top 10 tips of all time.
Here's my question: How resistant to gas and primer/paint is the 290? If I go that route, I'd prolly have to forego any hopes of ever tinning or leading afterwards...it's a one-way road. Got any place you can point me to research this a bit more?
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Old 08-28-2007, 02:03 PM   #249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krampus
No Shit? Dirty...That could very well be one of the top 10 tips of all time.
Here's my question: How resistant to gas and primer/paint is the 290? If I go that route, I'd prolly have to forego any hopes of ever tinning or leading afterwards...it's a one-way road. Got any place you can point me to research this a bit more?
No Shit there Krampus!! The stuff cures to a very chemical resistant thermoset plastic and does fine with fuels of all sorts including good old petrol, primers and paints.

For another vote on this unconventional use for this product for your application call the tech. product support line at 800-LOCTITE. Make sure to tell them some wiley cat from Baton Rouge told you to call. And if a Canook answers the phone tell them to slap Sylvain on the back of the head for you.

Dirty
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dirty_sanchez screwed with this post 08-28-2007 at 02:20 PM
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Old 08-28-2007, 03:15 PM   #250
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I called Loctite, already closed. Searched the web and Loctite's site and found this...
http://www.loctite.com/int_henkel/lo..._DoItRight.pdf

Page 13. Looks like for my application(steel) I need to use 089 Weld Sealant/Grade AA, but I'm having a difficult time getting product info on the site...it doesn't show up when I do a search. But I'm on the right track.
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Old 08-28-2007, 10:28 PM   #251
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonS
I read this thread a while back and decided to pick up a TIG welder. It's one of the small inverter welders that will run up to 200 amps with an air cooled Weldcraft torch. I've read everything I can get my hands on and I'm essentially teaching myself how to do it. I'm getting to the point where I can periodically lay a relatively clean bead down on mild steel but my beads are still pretty inconsistent and the bad sections still out number the good sections. I am running into a couple of things that seem to be limiting my progress though. One is that I seem to be consuming tungsten at a pretty rapid rate. I grind the 1.5 lanthanum tungsten to a point using a Sharpie hand held grinder that I picked up through Arc Zone. The point looks fine but within a couple of inches of bead, the tip seems to deteriorate. If I keep going, it eventually turns into a ball instead of a point. The gas flow looks Ok (20 CFM) even though I do get some smoke on the cup. The arc looks good until the tip starts to ball up. I think my distance is ok. The amperage I'm using appears to be within the range for the tungsten diameter I'm using. What would be your guess as to the problem?

Another question I have is concerning the technique for running the torch. Do good tig welders have the steady hands of a surgeon or are they just good a finding brace points for their hands? I mean keeping the tip an 1/8 to a 1/4 from the base metal, feeding the filler rod and operating foot switch requires a degree of skill that it appears will take a while to master. I've stuck the tip and contaminated the electrode with the filler rod a number of times when trying to free hand everything.
OK
First, what polarity is the welder set at? AC? DC+ or DC- ?

The positive half of an AC cycle contains the major amount of heat in an arc. In other words when you set a TIG welder to DC+ the electrode will melt down. Never run DC+ when you TIG weld because your Tungsten will melt before your work. Also when running AC on your TIG welder the Tungsten electrode will see DC+ half the time and DC- half the time. This will also cause the tungsten electrode to melt on the DC+ half of the cycle.

So when using AC to TIG weld you can expect your tungsten to melt to a round end eventualy. Weld aluminum with AC only, not steel or stainless.

Use DC- for stainless and steel. Using DC- will focus most of the heat into the metal and not on your tungsten electrode. Your electrode will stay sharp longer using DC- but will also eventualy round over in time.

To help make a Tungsten last longer use as large of a diameter electrode as is practical. A 1/8 inch diameter Tungsten electrode will handle heat input better and last longer than a smaller one. Also the flow rate of sheilding gas is inportant. With an aircooled TIG torch the shielding gas is your only source of torch cooling so always run a post flow of 10 to 15 seconds to let the torch flow gas through the torch so the electrode is not glowing red before the gas stops running. 25 CFH is a good flow rate for most small aircooled torches.

And finally, practice, practice, practice. It is my opinion that TIG welding requires the most skill of all the welding processes. Use what ever you can to brace your hands or parts to make your welding as easy as possible. It is easier to make a good weld when you are sitting on a comfortable stool and have something to rest your hands on.

Don't get discouraged.
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Old 08-28-2007, 10:31 PM   #252
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
Advrider's very own Loctite factory rep checking in here to offer up my very own two bits of drivel.

Years back a salty old welder discovered a wicking grade threadlocker like 290 could fill pinholes created during the welding process.

Just heat the tank up to the point you still can touch the tank without burning yourself and liberally drip and wipe the 290 all over the affected area and let cool.

You could use 290 or AA Weld Sealant (which is virtually the same thing)

Capillary action draws either product into all of the pinhole voids and the tank will be sealed.

Dirty


That is a very cool trick!!!!!!!
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Old 08-29-2007, 09:26 AM   #253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
OK
First, what polarity is the welder set at? AC? DC+ or DC- ?
Sorry, I was going to add that. It's set to DCEN which should be correct. It behaves as if it is set to DCEP or AC however. I don't have any refference points to tell what the difference is though. The tungsten does get hot. Hotter than red hot. More like white hot. Perhaps my gas flow is still to low?
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Old 08-31-2007, 09:19 AM   #254
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonS
Sorry, I was going to add that. It's set to DCEN which should be correct. It behaves as if it is set to DCEP or AC however. I don't have any refference points to tell what the difference is though. The tungsten does get hot. Hotter than red hot. More like white hot. Perhaps my gas flow is still to low?
I discovered something else. I was using an .040 tungsten to weld thin wall (.0035) 5/8 4130 tubing. I was running 40 amps, pulsing at 100 cps with 80 %spent at peak amperage. I decided to try the next size tungsten, a 1/16 (.060). Using that size, my tip sure does last a lot longer. The trouble is that the charts I have say that the .040 should be good for 15-80 amps when running DCEN and the .060 range is 70-150 amps when running DCEN. Are these charts wrong? I have the tip extending about the diameter of the cap so it shouldn't be a problem with cooling. If it is, would a gas lens help?

The other thing I'm noticing is that when welding this tubing, which I've notched to fit, I have a very hard time seeing the edges of the tubing. I more often than not end up welding just one edge rather than both pieces together. Is there a trade secret associated with how to actually see the edges you're welding when doing this stuff?
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Old 08-31-2007, 05:21 PM   #255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonS
snip... The other thing I'm noticing is that when welding this tubing, which I've notched to fit, I have a very hard time seeing the edges of the tubing. I more often than not end up welding just one edge rather than both pieces together. Is there a trade secret associated with how to actually see the edges you're welding when doing this stuff?
You may already know more than this, but... The only trick I've picked up regarding this problem (and I learned it about MIG, but it may apply to your problem) is to train your eyes to never look at the arc, but only watch the puddle - both the hot side and the side that's solidifying. I found that watching the puddle gave me much better vision to watch the joint I'm following. And watching the "freeze zone" helps regulate your speed to just stay ahead. Watching the puddle also made me see better the amount of penetration without looking at the arc itself which just destroys your vision of the joint. You may already be focusing on the puddle as you dab the filler rod.
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