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Old 05-15-2012, 07:09 AM   #2761
David R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rapid Dog View Post
Coll. Thanks for the input. Chricky there are alot of models to choose from out there. Right now I just have a small 120V Lincoln for stuff around the ranchito.
I'd like to learn to do some of those nice Tig welds though.
Does someone make a 120V Tig, small enough to carry around?

Lincoln V160T. Fine machine. I have a V155-S that is also a nice machine and a V160-S. The 155 (11 lbs) does not take a foot pedal, the 160 (18 lbs) does.

Miller makes a similar machine. Almost any DC welder will tig.

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Old 05-15-2012, 04:54 PM   #2762
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Originally Posted by Pike Bishop View Post
Now that's what *I* would like to learn ... but where does a middle-aged hobbyist go to learn machining? The community college doesn't teach it!
I like to get more into CNC but same here The community college doesn't teach it!, If there is a Vo-tech school around go there, I took that back in 79-80.

Any way the frame i am talking about is i think, 4130 mat. high tensile strength steel, but do keep in mind that manufactures are going to build things quickly and inexpensively as possible (Cheap) more than likely the frame was robot welded at the factory
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Old 05-15-2012, 09:21 PM   #2763
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pike Bishop View Post
Now that's what *I* would like to learn ... but where does a middle-aged hobbyist go to learn machining? The community college doesn't teach it!
You could just buy a machine and go from there,don't get caught up in the hype that you have to have something big.
I would even go as far as saying some of the smaller machines although the spindle bore is small the swing can be bigger.

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Old 05-15-2012, 11:40 PM   #2764
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Originally Posted by mikejohn View Post
I like to get more into CNC but same here The community college doesn't teach it!, If there is a Vo-tech school around go there, I took that back in 79-80.

Any way the frame i am talking about is i think, 4130 mat. high tensile strength steel, but do keep in mind that manufactures are going to build things quickly and inexpensively as possible (Cheap) more than likely the frame was robot welded at the factory

Your Triumph frame isnt likely to be 4130, as using this material is likely to double production costs over using the far more common ERW tubing. which can easily be joined by MIG welding. Take a close look a how the frame was built originally, and if MIG was used its almost certain to be ERW (no matter what the advertising blurb might say!).

There is no real need for CNC for use in your home workshop, but its certainly worth looking at if you have small scale part production in mind. You can do pretty much any home turning job on a manual machine, but its a good idea to avoid new Chinese lathes and buy used American or English as these will be better made and easier to use for a beginner.
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Old 05-16-2012, 05:49 AM   #2765
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Originally Posted by Twin-shocker View Post
You can do pretty much any home turning job on a manual machine, but its a good idea to avoid new Chinese lathes and buy used American or English as these will be better made and easier to use for a beginner.
I disagree. I'm a huge follower of american iron, for years I rebuilt american woodworking equipment from 1950 and older. That stuff is amazing and heavily built.

American machine tools however can be a crap shoot. While they are better built for sure, the chances of them being used in a production environment are high and with that comes a lot of wear. Wear that can be a nightmare to deal wiith and frustrating to a beginner.

I would like to move to an American machine now just for the whole "feel" of it, but I like to rebuild things and tinker. I would expect to pay double what my machine costs for an excellent example in similar size and swing. For my buy in I got a lathe with zero wear (it was used, but by a homeowner I got at his personal estate auction), lots of tooling, plug in and go. No backlash anywhere, threads metric etc.

South Bend and company command a premium price, even ones with considerable wear and slop. The taiwan lathes made today are actually quite good. The castings are not beautiful to look at like a comparable US machine, but the point is that they work. Not having three phase in your shop adds to the expense as many of them were equipped with three phase motors.

If you just want to dip your toes in the water, buy a inexpensive lathe with some tooling and give it a whirl. If you don't like it, flip it and move on. If you have a great time doing it, down the road you'll appreciate (and know what to look for) in your next machine.

If you really want an American machine of industrial quality, go to machine shop auctions. It's fun just to play with all the old stuff and there's lots of tooling for dirt cheap. I went to one the week after I bought my Enco, and they sold a 12" Clausing with Aloris toolpost for $450 and it was a nice machine. Probably a good idea to bring someone along with you who can check it out or read a lathe buying how-to, but int he end it's a crap shoot.
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:30 AM   #2766
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Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post

The DR650 has a phillips head screw for a floatbowl drain. But they're stupid tight and easy to strip. I'm going to buy a few and weld allen heads on them. Fixt. The cool thing about a good TIG is how small you can weld.

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You're finding them easy to strip because they aren't phillips heads, they're JIS.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:19 AM   #2767
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Thanks for the reply and good advice, Sailah.
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Old 05-16-2012, 05:30 PM   #2768
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin-shocker View Post
Your Triumph frame isn't likely to be 4130, as using this material is likely to double production costs over using the far more common ERW tubing. which can easily be joined by MIG welding. Take a close look a how the frame was built originally, and if MIG was used its almost certain to be ERW (no matter what the advertising blurb might say!).

There is no real need for CNC for use in your home workshop, but its certainly worth looking at if you have small scale part production in mind. You can do pretty much any home turning job on a manual machine, but its a good idea to avoid new Chinese lathes and buy used American or English as these will be better made and easier to use for a beginner.
I was thinking more of a 2 axis type mill like an anilim, looks like a brigdeport
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:11 PM   #2769
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Originally Posted by sailah View Post
I disagree. I'm a huge follower of american iron, for years I rebuilt american woodworking equipment from 1950 and older. That stuff is amazing and heavily built.

American machine tools however can be a crap shoot. While they are better built for sure, the chances of them being used in a production environment are high and with that comes a lot of wear. Wear that can be a nightmare to deal wiith and frustrating to a beginner.

I would like to move to an American machine now just for the whole "feel" of it, but I like to rebuild things and tinker. I would expect to pay double what my machine costs for an excellent example in similar size and swing. For my buy in I got a lathe with zero wear (it was used, but by a homeowner I got at his personal estate auction), lots of tooling, plug in and go. No backlash anywhere, threads metric etc.

South Bend and company command a premium price, even ones with considerable wear and slop. The taiwan lathes made today are actually quite good. The castings are not beautiful to look at like a comparable US machine, but the point is that they work. Not having three phase in your shop adds to the expense as many of them were equipped with three phase motors.

If you just want to dip your toes in the water, buy a inexpensive lathe with some tooling and give it a whirl. If you don't like it, flip it and move on. If you have a great time doing it, down the road you'll appreciate (and know what to look for) in your next machine.

If you really want an American machine of industrial quality, go to machine shop auctions. It's fun just to play with all the old stuff and there's lots of tooling for dirt cheap. I went to one the week after I bought my Enco, and they sold a 12" Clausing with Aloris toolpost for $450 and it was a nice machine. Probably a good idea to bring someone along with you who can check it out or read a lathe buying how-to, but int he end it's a crap shoot.

Taiwan made machine tools look to me pretty good. In regard to Chinese though, take a look at the number of sites set up by people who own these machines, detailing various ways of overcoming the many problem areas that most of these have when brand new!
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:25 PM   #2770
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Originally Posted by Twin-shocker View Post
Taiwan made machine tools look to me pretty good. In regard to Chinese though, take a look at the number of sites set up by people who own these machines, detailing various ways of overcoming the many problem areas that most of these have when brand new!
I think people interchange Chinese and Taiwan too often. The little 9x20 lathes, sure I can see that there are a lot of problems inherent in such a small machine, and many work arounds required to get sufficient performance out of one.

For the larger 12" bigger lathes, I think you'll find the quality gets up there.

Let me put it this way. My Taiwan lathe is capable of turning parts to a level I'll probably never achieve. It's as accurate as I can expect, or measure, and for what I am making (motorcycle doo dads), it far outpaces my abilities as an operator. I've never wished I had a "better" lathe.

My only complaint is the looks. Which is stupid I admit to evaluate a tool by, but I can't help it. I love American iron and if I could fit one in my garage, I would sell mine in a second. The feel of the handles, the style of the castings...delicious.

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Old 05-16-2012, 11:03 PM   #2771
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BTW, did you name yourself Nailhead after early Buick V8's?
No, I was a carpenter back in '03.

I work in the oilfield now, so I probably should change it to Bonehead.

Thanks for the tip, by the way; I have yet to stick the wire, so I must be doing something right, or at least not totally wrong.
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:24 AM   #2772
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Originally Posted by sailah View Post
I think people interchange Chinese and Taiwan too often. The little 9x20 lathes, sure I can see that there are a lot of problems inherent in such a small machine, and many work arounds required to get sufficient performance out of one.

For the larger 12" bigger lathes, I think you'll find the quality gets up there.

Let me put it this way. My Taiwan lathe is capable of turning parts to a level I'll probably never achieve. It's as accurate as I can expect, or measure, and for what I am making (motorcycle doo dads), it far outpaces my abilities as an operator. I've never wished I had a "better" lathe.

My only complaint is the looks. Which is stupid I admit to evaluate a tool by, but I can't help it. I love American iron and if I could fit one in my garage, I would sell mine in a second. The feel of the handles, the style of the castings...delicious.


That looks a very nice lathe to me, and not comparable to some of the offerings from China of the same size, which probably cost 30-40% less but which are nowhere near as high quality.
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Old 05-17-2012, 02:46 AM   #2773
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I think Sailah was citing Monarch as an example of "American iron," not Taiwanese or Chi-com, Twin...
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Old 05-17-2012, 05:21 AM   #2774
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I think Sailah was citing Monarch as an example of "American iron," not Taiwanese or Chi-com, Twin...
Zackery. I will own one of those lathes, it's just gorgeous. I'm not sure I would have gone red like that but goodnight I fantasize what I would do to that lathe if no one was looking

Whew, I need a cold shower.

OK diverted this thread successfully, let's get back to welding.

I'm welding this header for my project bike. The guy that sold the tubing and collectors said to fuse the tubes together, before going into the collector. OK did that. I had to lightly hammer the collector to get a good fit around the primaries. Having a little trouble reaching in the "valleys" to get a bead going to seal the collector. Hope that makes sense. I guess I'm trying to get a root pass, and not having lots of luck. I have the tungsten out maybe 3/16-1/4". I think the cup is getting in the way. Would going to one of the larger cups and extending the tungsten along with higher CFH, get me a better result?

I don't have any larger cups or I would have tried already, but I am going to the welding supply to refill my tank today so I thought I would ask.

Not the best picture but you can see the 4-2 & 2-1 collectors I'm having trouble getting all the way around

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Old 05-17-2012, 05:52 AM   #2775
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A gas lens will let you extend the tungsten more and still get coverage. Size of cup and space can help. As long as you get gas coverage.
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