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Old 05-21-2012, 07:44 PM   #2806
ER70S-2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanotech9 View Post
the float ball in the flow meter glass is set around 40. I've dialed the knobs exactly where they should be (remember, i can dial a working machine to run just fine for me, at least on the amateur level) and then run them out to the extremes.
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Originally Posted by nanotech9 View Post
yes after the post-flow cuts off then the ball drops down. I've varied the amount of gas, but probably not quite that low (usually try between 20 - 40, generally on the 30 mark).

Happy to try it set lower.

If they can't fix it, I'm going to have to break down and take it to a big welding shop in town that we do business with and hope for a "cheap" fix... lol
I think 20-40 is MIG flow rates. You aren't doing anything but wasting argon at those flow rates (also an amateur, paying for my own argon, on a Miller Syncrowave 250, no gauges). I weld at 12-15 cfh.

How I got to 'balance'. Two guys, in the next booth, asked me to show them how I was welding alum (easy 1/8" strap). Same machine, checked their set-up and failed miserably. Sometime later that evening I thought "oops, forgot to check the balance". Next day I looked and it had been set to "0".
If space allows, I use a #8 cup (1/2"). It gives better coverage for my skills. Good luck.
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Old 05-22-2012, 01:25 PM   #2807
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OK, so I have this Fronius transformer-based DC-TIG which I converted to squarewave-AC by adding an inverter. It worked well for several months, but last week it blew a resistor:



Symptoms: there was an ingnition spark from tungsten to workpiece, but no welding arc was formed. When tapping the tungsten to the workpiece, the arc would start and the welding was normal.

It turned out to be this resistor:



Makes sense. The capacitor and resistor together are responsible for initiating the arc once the HF has formed a conduction channel by passing a few amps through it. Somewhat later the welding current catches up.

Now, when used on AC, this resistor has to work everytime the polarity changes, which is 100 times a second, instead of once every minute or so. It is a miracle that it held so long.

So, I had to replace the resistor. Problem: no value (or text at all) was visible on the old resistor. And the schematic of the welder I have is a copy of a copy of a copy of a... Well, impossible to read the value in the schematic either.
I also removed the ceramic of the resistor hoping that measuring the resistance of one or two windings of the resistance wire would make it possible to extrapolate to total value. But the windings are heavily damaged also.

Since I do know a bit of electronics, I guesstimated the resistance to be 5-10 Ohms. So I ordered a 10 Ohm / 100W resistor and a 4.7 Ohm / 100W resistor.

10 Ohms works best, but not as well as the original resistor. The arc has a little more difficulty igniting, especially when on AC. 4.7 Ohms and 14.7 Ohms are worse.

This capacitor and resistor are present in every transformer-based welder. Does anyone have a schematic of a transformer-based (and preferrably thyristor-controlled) DC TIG-welder? I wonder what it's value is in other welders.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:06 PM   #2808
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Originally Posted by clintnz View Post
The next big workshop purchase is going to be an AC/DC TIG, I'm looking for max versatility, is there anything wrong with the 4 in 1 concept & getting a plasma cutter into the bargain?

I had one very similar to this but without the plasma. I guess there's some swapping around to get the various functions to work. I found the performance of the inverter machine to to great, welded much better than my abilities allowed. I was frustrated at the lack of parts available from my local Lincoln dealer so I switched to a Lincoln TIG when he took a used one in on trade. By parts I mean a new torch etc.

There seem to be a lot of people who have had good luck with them, and there are lots who don't. If you have a local dealer, that would make it a much easier decision for me. The guy in the US selling these, you'd need to ship across the country twice just to get warranty work done. Deal killer for me.

I have never had the plasma multifunction machine, but from what I can gather, if you aren't in a rush or using it comercially, it's great, but if something breaks, your whole machine is down. If space and money are major factors, I'd def look for one. You get a lot of bang for one of those machines.

I have pulse on my machine and really like it, esp for welding thin aluminum etc. Not a must have, but certainly nice to have and most of those higher end multis have it.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:17 PM   #2809
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Cheers Sailah

I think most of the cheap stuff now uses common consumables etc but that's something to watch.

I'm actually leaning towards the Mitech 4 in 1 with pulse at present as it has 60% vs 35% duty cycle at 200A, 200A Arc capability vs 160A & a foot pedal included, for $200 less than the Dynamic unit.

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Old 05-24-2012, 06:17 AM   #2810
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanotech9 View Post
I have a Tig question...

I've got an older Miller Synchrowave 250 (no digital readouts - only knobs and switches).

When it runs, it runs good... but most of the time its having a BIG problem.


When i try to start a nice flame, instead of developing the flame at the point of the tungsten, it'll start popping and arcing back in the cup, and try to make a flame as big as the cup... the tungsten turns bright red very quickly, and it produces a crazy amount of heat.

I've completely replaced the torch.
I've first gapped, then re-finished and gapped the points.
tried other bottles of argon
Does the same on DCN or AC (steel or aluminum)

Something i thought was weird is even with the high-freq turned to start, i still see it arcing like crazy (on DC-N) and its arcing way back up in the cup on the tungsten.


Every once in a while it'll start a perfect flame at the tip of the tungsten and purr like a kitten.

I can sit down at any other TIG that works, and lay down some decent beads, so I dont think its my own fault... who knows?

It sounds like your collet and diffuser are not tight to the electrode. If there is not a tight fit between these parts then the gap will arc. Make sure the tungsten size matches the collet holder. They are all determined by diameter.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:30 AM   #2811
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Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Weld question: I've heard that non-critical stainless steel welds can be done with 75/25 gas, which I have. I also happen to have a DG muffler and slip-on exhaust that has a SS (seems to be SS) bracket that cracked at the welds to the pipe.

Two options occur:

!.) try to buy a 1-pound spool of SS wire (2-pound if I have to) and practice my SS welding for the first time on a relatively cheap exhaust.

2.) and the other - which this thread is not about - take it to someone to weld.

So back to option #1, what type of stainless would I most likely be working with in an exhaust tube, and secondly, which type of stainless wire should I buy (Ideally .024 to get the better current flow with my 120V Lincoln)? Besides burning through it, the worst I could do would be to have a weld that would fail... but DG already proved people can make money for those kinds of welds.

Thanks so much.
If your MIG welding use a 98%argon 2%CO2 gas or use a trimix ArHeCO2 gas. You need to limit the amount of reactive gases in your mix and CO2 and O2 are reactive.

Use 308LSi for welding stainless to stainless and 309LSi for welding stainless to mild steel. Most exhausts for cars are made out of 409 stainless because it's cheap. It also keeps its strength in high heat applications.

Look on the first post of this thread for free literature from Lincoln Electric that includes guides for welding stainless and TIG, MIG, etc.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:51 AM   #2812
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Originally Posted by sailah View Post
Can we pause on the tungsten discussion for a minute...

I have green, red and orange, which I understand from memory are pure, thoriated and ceriated.

I have been using pure for aluminum obviously. Welding these panniers, I have been using my WP9 with a 1/16" tungsten, gas lens and a 5 cup I think.

The material is 0.080" 5052 and I'm using 5356 filler. Should I got up to my other torch for this (WP26)? is there any advantage to a larger tungsten in this application? For the 26 I think I have collets for 3/32"



Also I know I am supposed to use the red for steel sharpened to a pencil point. Why would I use the orange? I bought it solely so I would have them all, never used it

Oh and I was welding these up today feeling good about my aluminum welding and how much progress I have made from a year ago when I basically started welding casually. Then I see this posted up in the Shiny Forum.


A larger tungsten will hold its point longer. It you don't mind holding a larger torch then use it.

The red, orange, green question. Pure tungsten is marked green and has traditionally been used for welding aluminum using AC polarity. Tungsten is used as an electrode because it can withstand the tremendous heat of an electrical arc. To make it even more tollerant to heat we add small amounts of noble metals like Thorium (red)or Cerium (orange) to increase the heat tollerance even more. These additions help to keep the electrodes point sharp, longer. You will pay more for these types of electrodes because those noble metal elements are hard to find. I am cheap so I stick with the red banded Thoriated electrodes for DC- welding and pure Tungsten green banded for AC.

With the new inverter TIG technology we can make AC at frequencies higher than the usual 60hz that most old school TIG welders use that naturally rounds off the end of a green banded electrode. This makes it possible to use a sharp pointed electrode for welding AC on aluminum so you can use red banded 2% Thoriated electrode for AC.

Machines like the Invertec V205AC/DC and Invertec V311AC/DC have the adjustable AC that will go higher than 60Hz.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:59 AM   #2813
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I've never welded before, but I know it's a damn handy skill to have. I'd love to make my own dirt bike trailer, but would obviously need to learn to weld first.

Are there any resources on where to start, that'll teach me the basics, etc? What's the smallest investment I'll have to make if I want to start?
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Old 05-24-2012, 07:52 AM   #2814
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Originally Posted by malignity View Post
I've never welded before, but I know it's a damn handy skill to have. I'd love to make my own dirt bike trailer, but would obviously need to learn to weld first.

Are there any resources on where to start, that'll teach me the basics, etc? What's the smallest investment I'll have to make if I want to start?
Here is a thread about books: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ighlight=books
Excellent advice is to find a community college class to learn welding, but if there are not any around where you live (like where I live) then books and practice are a reasonable plan B. You will be in better position to choose welding equipment after a class or some book learning. Used welding equipment from Craigs list is probably the best way to get into welding for reasonable price. You should be able to find good quality used equipment for less than junky new equipment.
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Old 05-24-2012, 01:11 PM   #2815
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Originally Posted by malignity View Post
I've never welded before, but I know it's a damn handy skill to have. I'd love to make my own dirt bike trailer, but would obviously need to learn to weld first.

Are there any resources on where to start, that'll teach me the basics, etc? What's the smallest investment I'll have to make if I want to start?
Yes. Come over to my house and I'll teach you.

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Old 05-24-2012, 01:19 PM   #2816
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Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar View Post
...
With the new inverter TIG technology we can make AC at frequencies higher than the usual 60hz that most old school TIG welders use that naturally rounds off the end of a green banded electrode. This makes it possible to use a sharp pointed electrode for welding AC on aluminum so you can use red banded 2% Thoriated electrode for AC.

Machines like the Invertec V205AC/DC and Invertec V311AC/DC have the adjustable AC that will go higher than 60Hz.

wow - cool!

I was taught with aluminum you flip it to DC+, find a piece of stainless or brass and start up an arc and let a tiny ball form on the end of the point, on purpose... then switch to AC and go about your aluminum business...

I guess thats the "old way" now...
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:41 PM   #2817
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I read through this thread briefly... I hope I didn't miss my question. Actually I have two questions... the first is on basic welding setup.

I've been welding for a few years, bu always used flux core (messy). Now that I have a garage and can weld indoors, I want to start using shielding gas. I have the tank, the regulator, all that and it's hooked up. I just have to put the solid-core spool in and switch the polarity. The question I have is, once that's done, how do you set the regulator etc to use the proper amount of gas?


Then the next question... I crashed my KLX250S pretty hard in Death Valley back in March. I hit a big-ass rock which dented the piss out of the skidplate and bent up the left-side frame-attached case protector... U-shaped tubes running perpendicular to the frame on the bottom. It bent it all the way up against the case (no damage to the engine) and cracked the metal, separating it a good 1/4".

I've since removed the skidplate, hammered it flat, and bent that piece back down to where it belongs. I want to re-weld this piece. But I'm concerned about hurting the bike.

The reason is... last week I welded a bung to the header pipe on my DR650. Being stupid, I failed to slide the "clamp" part of the pipe up past where I was welding the bung. (D'oh). So I cut the clamp off and decided I would weld it back together on the other side of the bung. I get the bolt spacing right, I put the pipe back on, put the bolts in, and tack-welded it so I could finish it up off the bike.

Before tacking it, I unplugged the ECU, the regulator, disconnected the battery, and unplugged anything else I could get to easily.

Well I went on a ride last Sunday and discovered my battery wouldn't charge. I diagnosed it to a bad stator. My LED taillight was also blown. So now I'm worried that the welding caused these problems and I don't want to repeat that on the KLX.

What do you think? Possible or just coincidence?

Rob
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:51 PM   #2818
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malignity View Post
I've never welded before, but I know it's a damn handy skill to have. I'd love to make my own dirt bike trailer, but would obviously need to learn to weld first.

Are there any resources on where to start, that'll teach me the basics, etc? What's the smallest investment I'll have to make if I want to start?
This has been said many times but I will state it again. Trailers are not to be built by beginners. If you buy a 110v wire feeder and practice welding on your free time, it does not make you qualified to weld a trailer. For the sake of the innocent people behind you it should be done by someone who knows how to do it. No offense intended by this but too many people think just because the can run a bead they can build a trailer. Most of the mig machines normal people buy are not powerful enough. I think of it this way, make yourself a trailer in your garage. Weld it up and bolt a carseat to it. Then put one of your kids in the seat and see if you trust your welds enough to drive it down the highway at 80mph. If you think your welds will hold, then build away.
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:49 PM   #2819
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This has been said many times but I will state it again. Trailers are not to be built by beginners. If you buy a 110v wire feeder and practice welding on your free time, it does not make you qualified to weld a trailer. For the sake of the innocent people behind you it should be done by someone who knows how to do it. No offense intended by this but too many people think just because the can run a bead they can build a trailer. Most of the mig machines normal people buy are not powerful enough. I think of it this way, make yourself a trailer in your garage. Weld it up and bolt a carseat to it. Then put one of your kids in the seat and see if you trust your welds enough to drive it down the highway at 80mph. If you think your welds will hold, then build away.
I'm going to differ with this a little bit. My first welding project was a trailer. And it's still together six years later and working nicely. What it requires is enough practice, some research and patience.

I built a 2-place open ATV trailer in 2006. I was in Montana at the time and needed something smaller to tow behind a Jeep Grand Cherokee (ZJ) rather than my Haulmark enclosed trailer. I priced trailers around town and $1500-1800 was the cost, way more than I was willing to spend. I decided I had put off learning to weld for long enough.

I drew up plans for what I wanted to build, researched materials, asked questions at a local metal shop, and settled on a frame using 2x6 box steel (1/8" thick), and 2x4 box steel for the deck. I ordered a 4" drop axle from etrailerpart.com, and I already had a spare set of trailer wheels and tires from when I had put new wheels/tires on the enclosed trailer. I spent $400 in materials, $500 on the welder and a chop saw (a Hobart 110V welder and DeWalt chop saw), a grinder, and various tools (magnets, clamps, etc) and went to work. I spent three weeks on it, working in the driveway after work.

For the frame, I built a rectangle, approximately 5' wide by 11' long (the length of the deck), then added a 5' tongue to it with a center member. For the deck, I made it 8' wide and 11' long. I ran 2x2 angle cross supports every 18", set down not quite 2", because the deck itself was built out of 2x8 pressure-treated wood. I also ran some additional 2x2 angle supports between the underside of the deck and the frame, and then cleaned up the back with some strip steel. I drilled and mounted recessed LED lights all around, and even welded a reinforced 2" receiver on the back of the trailer (and wired it too) in case I ever wanted to tow something behind it. It's been very handy for carrying a bike rack.

I wish I had some current photos of it, but it's stored in my mother-in-law's back yard. I haven't used it in the last year but I'm about to pull it out, put new tires on it, give it a fresh coat of paint, and start making use of it again.

But being new to welding back then, I did a lot of testing on it. When it was complete, I took it for a tow unloaded... came back, looked at all my welds. Then went for a test tow on rough road. Checked again. Loaded up a quad and repeated the process. No signs of stress or cracks in any welds.

I did find photos of it when I was building it. The last two photos in the spread show the final version of it, with the finished up rear end and the stake pockets. I had forgotten I had these. You can see them here.
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:52 PM   #2820
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Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar View Post
It sounds like your collet and diffuser are not tight to the electrode. If there is not a tight fit between these parts then the gap will arc. Make sure the tungsten size matches the collet holder. They are all determined by diameter.
I can't imagine anything in the torch being lose enough to arc and still retain the tungsten in the torch.
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