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Old 07-01-2012, 12:24 PM   #2911
NitroAcres
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350 or 700 Miller Dynasty, combine that with a HiAmp Speedway torch setup and you are good to go...(well with lots of practice).

700 Dynasty
3" od x 3/8" wall 6061 top machined part is semi sold (has a counterbore at the interface, 1/2" walls)..so total wall is 7/8"
Straight Argon, Start temp 100 degrees F.

NitroAcres screwed with this post 07-01-2012 at 12:46 PM
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Old 07-01-2012, 12:29 PM   #2912
David R
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenL View Post
I've been following this post for a while, and I've also been teaching myself TIG for the last 6 months or so.

What is the best to weld a nut to some mild sheet steel? I'd like to be able to weld these on so that I can bolt a part on what would otherwise be difficult to access the rear of. Do you use a bolt to hold the nut in place as you weld (this didn't work real well for me)? What are some tricks?

Thanks in advance!
ANTISEEZ on the bolt and yes bolt the nut to the plate or sheet. Weld in place, remove bolt while still hot. Most regular nuts and bolts are zinc coated. It burns off when you weld. Don't Breathe The White Smoke ! Non coated nuts are better but difficult to find.

David
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Old 07-01-2012, 02:32 PM   #2913
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R-A-M-O-N View Post
Thanks. Believe me i know the consecuences of a bad head repair, ive seen it more than once. As i said this is more of a long term project im planning in the long run, maybe for next year and use this year to get info, buy the necessary equipment (which isnt cheap at all), do some courses and practice a lot. But my ultimate goal is alu head repairs.
If you have a 3phase supply you should be able to get an old transformer Miller or Lincoln set for reasonable money, which will be perfectly ok for this type of work. I would also suggest some form of crack detecting equipment is a very good idea, as is a bead blast cabinet if you dont have one already.

In terms of cost though you could probably set up to repair cast iron heads for less than alloy, but gas welding cast iron is far more of a skilled process than TIG, which most can pick up in less than 30 minutes if they can gas weld already.

Cast iron repair is likely to be much more profitable than alloy, as very few people are able to do this, and if you have a TIG for alloy, you would also be able to repair parts like exhaust manifolds using TIG brazing.
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Old 07-01-2012, 03:33 PM   #2914
clintnz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
ANTISEEZ on the bolt and yes bolt the nut to the plate or sheet. Weld in place, remove bolt while still hot. Most regular nuts and bolts are zinc coated. It burns off when you weld. Don't Breathe The White Smoke ! Non coated nuts are better but difficult to find.

David
Also, make sure you don't have a high tensile nut. The more similar the steels the better the weld will be. Of course the low tensile nuts are the ones that usually come galv or plated while the HT ones are plain...

Cheers
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:32 AM   #2915
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
that is GD sexy! was that welded out on a rotator rig or is there a start/stop hidden somewhere in all that bad assness?
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:19 AM   #2916
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
350 or 700 Miller Dynasty, combine that with a HiAmp Speedway torch setup and you are good to go...(well with lots of practice).

700 Dynasty
3" od x 3/8" wall 6061 top machined part is semi sold (has a counterbore at the interface, 1/2" walls)..so total wall is 7/8"
Straight Argon, Start temp 100 degrees F.
I just kicked my dog

Nice work fido!!!
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Old 07-02-2012, 09:47 AM   #2917
NitroAcres
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmaxmike View Post
that is GD sexy! was that welded out on a rotator rig or is there a start/stop hidden somewhere in all that bad assness?
Yep, turn table, and pulse...My trucks all have AM/FM/CD/Radio's, Electric Windows and A/C too....

I still go back and run my 1970's P&H Chemtron to remember the handcranks and 2/65 air, just for fun.
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Old 07-02-2012, 11:08 AM   #2918
R-A-M-O-N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
350 or 700 Miller Dynasty, combine that with a HiAmp Speedway torch setup and you are good to go...(well with lots of practice).

700 Dynasty
3" od x 3/8" wall 6061 top machined part is semi sold (has a counterbore at the interface, 1/2" walls)..so total wall is 7/8"
Straight Argon, Start temp 100 degrees F.
Well if you could tell me were to buy the "lots of practice" part im all set Great work, some day ill have something worth sharing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin-shocker View Post
If you have a 3phase supply you should be able to get an old transformer Miller or Lincoln set for reasonable money, which will be perfectly ok for this type of work. I would also suggest some form of crack detecting equipment is a very good idea, as is a bead blast cabinet if you dont have one already.

In terms of cost though you could probably set up to repair cast iron heads for less than alloy, but gas welding cast iron is far more of a skilled process than TIG, which most can pick up in less than 30 minutes if they can gas weld already.

Cast iron repair is likely to be much more profitable than alloy, as very few people are able to do this, and if you have a TIG for alloy, you would also be able to repair parts like exhaust manifolds using TIG brazing.
Since ill be adding to my dads business 90% of his work comes in form of aluminium heads. However i could ask around to see how much demand is there to weld cast iron heads over here, thanks for the idea.
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Old 07-02-2012, 11:19 AM   #2919
Twin-shocker
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TIG welding isnt really that difficult once you have the basics, and for welding heads a 300A transformer set with watercooled torch will be just fine, so you dont need to spend that much money on equipment.

Here in the UK very few people are able to repair cast iron parts, and in some cases the cost of replacement is very high, so setting up for these with gas and powder welding, and some form of furnace for pre-heat, post-cool, might be well worth looking at?
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Old 07-02-2012, 03:19 PM   #2920
David R
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NitroAcres , that is some beautiful work.

Do you play a musical instrument?

I guess I am more of a meat and potatoes welder.

David
edited to give proper credit.
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David R screwed with this post 07-03-2012 at 04:23 AM
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:46 AM   #2921
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Sick. And sickening that that's gonna get used for motorsports as opposed to being displayed in a museum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NitroAcres View Post
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:58 AM   #2922
NitroAcres
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Sick. And sickening that that's gonna get used for motorsports as opposed to being displayed in a museum.
Worse, it is actually part of a Mobile Satcom Dish Support...not even a race part...:(
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:55 AM   #2923
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It would take me 100 years to learn welding aluminium like that, and even after 100 years I probably could not do it THAT nice!

About the nut welding: I put a little copper grease on the bolt (if I don't forget), tighten down the bolt so the nut stays where it is supposed to be, and use two tacks (on opposite sides). Since the welds only have to keep the nut in it's location a single tack would do, but two keeps things flatter/straighter and prevents the nut from bending inwards during a ham-fisted bolt install.

Advantage of two tacks only: little to no distortion, and quick.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:55 PM   #2924
Twin-shocker
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TIG welding really isnt that difficult, and top end inverter sets with features like pulse and AC/DC mix, make things even easier. Basically anyone able to gas weld will be able to pick up TIG very quickly, but not quite so easy without experience with gas, which other than setting your TIG machine will mean you are likely to understand the effects of heat, also how to control the weld puddle, and are pretty much good to go.

There are plenty of cheap Chinese AC/DC sets available nowadays, which make the TIG process accessible to far more people than a few years back when the only real options were either very costly, or very big and heavy and mostly required 3 phase power supply. For work on bikes an AC/DC TIG set is ideal, as it will mean you can weld pretty much anything likely to be found on a bike.
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:54 PM   #2925
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So what your saying is my $500 60's 300 amp 1000 lbs transformer is as good as a new $10,000 super duper solid state machine?
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