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Old 09-10-2013, 04:32 AM   #3571
jules083
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The fumes are bad, but you learn to keep your head out of them pretty early on. You don't need to be right above the weld, just as long as you can see what you're doing. When I was first learning I used to do the same thing, get too close trying to pay attention.

I wear a respirator at work a lot, it's not too bad under a hood as long as it's not a real hot day. When it's too hot I sweat a lot and fog up glasses. Not much you can do then, one way or another you're screwed

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Old 09-10-2013, 06:56 AM   #3572
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+1 on the shield, but he should probably learn stick--depending on his future plans. There are so many conditions where stick is THE way to go.
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+1
he should learn it for sure as its always a good skill to have, but once he has it he should move on. besides custom bits for motorcycles and other hobby stuff looks better MIG or TIG welded. and you can even get a name brand 110v MIG or TIG machine for not a whole lot more then a Lincoln tombstone.

we don't even have a stick machine in our shop and we try and try to get the local vo-tech schools to teach more TIG/sub arc/MIG and less stick but they seem to think that everyone going there is going to go buy a truck and be a pipeline welder and that's just not true.
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:50 AM   #3573
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Not really a question, more of an informative post so future googlers may save some time searching.

I picked up an old Central Electric (Harbor Freight) Power Mig 180/1 off of CL a while back. It needed some gun parts. Not sure what the PO did to it but the nozzle was gone & the gas diffuser was mangled pretty severely.

This is a large heavy model, not like the newer 180s that will fit on a cart. This one came with wheels and was made in Italy instead of China.

I took the diffuser to 3 local welding shops & none of them had ever seen anything like it. I spent a lot of time googling & trying to find it with no luck. Ended up using google's image search for gas diffuser until I found one that looked close. Ended up being a Clarke 180EN equivalent.

I ordered the diffuser, a nozzle & a 10 pack of tips from usawelding.com as their site had the picture & a nice zoom of it along with the specs

Here's the diffuser, straight from their site:


All I need now is a regulator for my CO2 tank & I'll be in business
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:31 PM   #3574
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Originally Posted by The Velvet Monkey View Post
I'm hoping someone can give me some sage advice.

I've enrolled in a welding class at my local vocational institute and had my first class last night, which focused on stick welding. It was a really good class, we were using 6010 rods on 1/4" steel plate, but I'm concerned about the fumes that I inhaled while practicing my technique over a few hours.

The classroom has booths with adjustable ventilation hoods, but I still seemed to be exposed to--what seemed to me, at least--a lot of smoke before the ventilation hood, even at its closest position, could pick it up. It took me a while to realize that the ventilation hoods weren't particularly strong before I put the hood down as far as it would go and still enable me to work. On a couple of occasions the smoke roiled underneath and into my helmet and, while I tried my best to avoid inhaling it, I probably inhaled a fair bit.

This may be completely hypochondriacally (because I've found my exposure worrisome, and I'm prone to such feelings), but today I feel like I have slightly irritated throat after having last night felt a vague metallic taste in my mouth.

I can't imagine that one can inhale this smoke without suffering detrimental health consequences. When I mentioned the issue to few of my fellow students and the instructor (who, incidentally has a horrific cough and confessed to COPD after 55 years of welding), they acknowledged the problem, but no one seems particularly concerned.

So I guess my questions are:

Am I being overly sensitive to the consequences of inhaling the amount of smoke that persists under the circumstances of the ventilated welding booth? Perhaps the amount I'm inhaling does not pose a material risk over the course of the class, and I don't intend to weld except as a hobbyist.

Or, has my seemingly benign desire to pick up the welding skill already exposed me, albeit unintentionally, to a significant and dangerous dose of toxic substances--toxins that are at this moment congealing within me, a time bomb that will resurface at the most inopportune time in my future (like after I win the Power Ball) so as to strike me down with a horrible illness providing a horrifically slow death, during which I beg for sweet release and curse the day I picked up a welding rod--and I would be foolish to ever again stick weld?

In any event, I'd like to continue the class, if I can do so (or am already doing so under the circumstances) safely.

Most of the fume emitted from a 6010 rod is iron oxide. You also create ozone when the arc light ( ultraviolet) hits oxygen in the area around the arc. For the most part the fumes are just irritants and have no long term effects. I would try to avoid all welding fume. Set the fume hood as close to your weldment as possible. Stainless steels are bad for you and the hexavailant chrome is not good to breath.
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:48 PM   #3575
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Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar View Post
Stainless steels are bad for you and the hexavailant chrome is not good to breath.
Bad is an understatement. Respirators only when welding stainless unless you have excellent ventilation. Hex chrome will kill you if you breath enough of it. It's arguably worse than asbestos depending on who you talk to.

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Old 09-10-2013, 07:52 PM   #3576
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TL;DR

Last year I bought a property with a 2K SF shop.

I have a project in mind for one of my trucks and I decided that it would be best if I did most of the fabrication instead of farming it out.

So I need to start equipping the shop.

One of the first things I decided would be good to get would be gas torch; oxy-acetylene (and propane too for preheating and other things).

So I was looking through CL for a deal on a complete setup, but at the prices and condition of rigs that I saw for sale, I decided maybe it would be better (and possibly safer) if I bought something new.

Now I have used a torch before for cutting and welding small things - took classes even. But it has been over thirty years and stuff changes. I noticed the Victor brand is still around and that is what we used everywhere I ever worked or took classes.

But they have been bought out?

They also have a new fangled regulator tech that looks nice, but I thought I would ask:

a) Is Victor still a good brand?

b) Is the new regulator tech they are selling good or are the old fashioned regulators better?

Thanks.
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:53 PM   #3577
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I just checked OHSA's website. Hex chrome causes more deaths per 1000 workers than asbestos.

This is not something to mess around with.

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Old 09-10-2013, 07:54 PM   #3578
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar View Post
Most of the fume emitted from a 6010 rod is iron oxide. You also create ozone when the arc light ( ultraviolet) hits oxygen in the area around the arc. For the most part the fumes are just irritants and have no long term effects. I would try to avoid all welding fume. Set the fume hood as close to your weldment as possible. Stainless steels are bad for you and the hexavailant chrome is not good to breath.
If it hasn't already been mentioned, another thing that is really bad for you and can make you sick pretty fast is zinc oxide from welding anything galvanized without really good ventilation.

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Old 09-10-2013, 07:55 PM   #3579
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I'm becoming a proselytizer for good respirators, and it sound funny coming from my mouth. But after years of hating wearing dust masks, and thinking of reasons not to, I got a decent 3m half mask to wear- it's far better, and it's actually pleasant to wear (as opposed to breathing nasty air). I got a 3m 7502, and it fits under a welding hood, and is pretty good about not fogging hood or glasses up. For about $40 with cartridges, it's a great investment. You really notice how nice it is to wear one of these things after a couple hours of grinding. . . . . .
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:58 PM   #3580
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IIRC Harris is another quality supplier. I believe they made the torches I bought from Sears (Craftsman), about 1975; you know, back when you could buy quality stuff there.
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Old 09-11-2013, 05:02 AM   #3581
CodyY
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Victor still located here in Fort Worth, TX.

All day every day. Still the industry standard.
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Old 09-11-2013, 07:24 AM   #3582
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ok thanx

what about the new regulators?

anybody know anything about them?
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Old 09-11-2013, 07:47 AM   #3583
dmaxmike
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ok thanx

what about the new regulators?

anybody know anything about them?
do you mean this kind? I think there very well made and when I finally got a garage with enough space to work in I bought a set for my home shop. I feel the gauges are more protected and the adjustment is easer. not sure if they will be around for 50 years like the old school all brass ones but for hobby use I would say there great.

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Old 09-11-2013, 06:56 PM   #3584
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Originally Posted by dmaxmike View Post
do you mean this kind? I think there very well made and when I finally got a garage with enough space to work in I bought a set for my home shop. I feel the gauges are more protected and the adjustment is easer. not sure if they will be around for 50 years like the old school all brass ones but for hobby use I would say there great.

yes - thanx
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Old 09-12-2013, 05:17 PM   #3585
David R
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Beating a dead horse

My son pulled this broken bolt out of a jack hammer. Its the first time we got a helicoil too.



Knowing him it was TIG.

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