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Old 03-08-2007, 06:37 PM   #46
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPARKDADDY
Good ideas that I can add to my list of stuff to fix.

Thanks
Can you post a picture of your broken spindle? Maybe we can fix it. You might be able to install a long bolt and big washer to hold the spindle. Just be careful to keep the wire spool from touching the case of the machine. The entire roll of weld wire is electrified when it is actually welding. You should be alright since most wire spools you use in 2 and 12.5 pound packages come on plastic spools so they are isolated.
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Old 03-09-2007, 07:11 AM   #47
bmwblake
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i only have 110 circuits in my garage. do all 110 welders suck? i'm a total noob just learning the ropes. i'm looking to get something in the next year or so that i can do spot welds on steel and some aluminum and i've read a lot of criticism of the 110 welders. i really dont want to run 220 to the garage b/c i dont plan on being in this place for much longer.

also, what equipment besides gloves/mask/welder should someone plan on buying to get started?

this should really get the opinions rolling.
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Old 03-09-2007, 06:44 PM   #48
KTM640Dakar OP
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Originally Posted by bmwblake
i only have 110 circuits in my garage. do all 110 welders suck? i'm a total noob just learning the ropes. i'm looking to get something in the next year or so that i can do spot welds on steel and some aluminum and i've read a lot of criticism of the 110 welders. i really dont want to run 220 to the garage b/c i dont plan on being in this place for much longer.

also, what equipment besides gloves/mask/welder should someone plan on buying to get started?

this should really get the opinions rolling.

110 Volt welders. The problem with 110/115volt input MIG (wire feed) welders is the amperage that they produce is limited. A good 110V MIG welder will produce 140 output amps max. 140 amps is not alot of output. If you can afford to buy a 230Volt input MIG welder then do it. Some 230V input machines go up to 350 Amps. That is more then enough power for most shops.



If you only have a 110V wall plugs in your garage then that is OK you can still do most practical projects with one. A Power Mig 140 will operate with enough power to weld 1/4 inch with the right settings. You should use a .035 diameter L-56 wire with 75% Argon 25% CO2 shielding gas for all of your mild steel welds, If you need to weld aluminum then get yourself an aluminum spool gun.

If you look in the yellow pages there are welding distributors that sell sheilding gas, welding wire and accessories that you need.

Make sure you are aware of all the safety issues involved with welding. One thing that really frustrates me when i watch a TV show like Orange County Choppers is their total disregard for weld safety. They never have long sleeves on when they weld, or gloves, or safety glasses, or sometimes even a weld helmet! You can get serious burns in your eyes if you look at the welding arc so always wear a welding helmet.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/community/safety/
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Old 03-10-2007, 06:17 AM   #49
bmwblake
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thanks or the input. i pass near this place all the time but have yet to go in there since i dont know how to weld yet. i recall one of the biker build off shows where the builder got retina burn from not wearing a mask. seriously stupid stuff.

thanks again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
110 Volt welders. The problem with 110/115volt input MIG (wire feed) welders is the amperage that they produce is limited. A good 110V MIG welder will produce 140 output amps max. 140 amps is not alot of output. If you can afford to buy a 230Volt input MIG welder then do it. Some 230V input machines go up to 350 Amps. That is more then enough power for most shops.



If you only have a 110V wall plugs in your garage then that is OK you can still do most practical projects with one. A Power Mig 140 will operate with enough power to weld 1/4 inch with the right settings. You should use a .035 diameter L-56 wire with 75% Argon 25% CO2 shielding gas for all of your mild steel welds, If you need to weld aluminum then get yourself an aluminum spool gun.

If you look in the yellow pages there are welding distributors that sell sheilding gas, welding wire and accessories that you need.

Make sure you are aware of all the safety issues involved with welding. One thing that really frustrates me when i watch a TV show like Orange County Choppers is their total disregard for weld safety. They never have long sleeves on when they weld, or gloves, or safety glasses, or sometimes even a weld helmet! You can get serious burns in your eyes if you look at the welding arc so always wear a welding helmet.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/community/safety/
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Old 03-10-2007, 10:43 PM   #50
OConnor
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Group buy on welding equipment?

I've used both Lincoln and Miller at work and find the Linolns much easier to set up for pulse, and the presets are nice.
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Old 03-11-2007, 12:23 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OConnor
Group buy on welding equipment?

I've used both Lincoln and Miller at work and find the Linolns much easier to set up for pulse, and the presets are nice.
Where do you live?
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Old 03-11-2007, 08:07 PM   #52
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Old 03-12-2007, 09:54 AM   #53
gsweave
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KTM640Dakar,


Let's get some knowledge.





I have this windshield bracket off of a 97 850R.

Seems 60,000 miles of vibration was too much for it.



My initial thought is to burn it back together with my stick welder using a Blue Max rod at 75 amps to tack. then do a full set at 90 amps.


Am I tacking it with too much amperage?







But I also have access to a Linde PWM-9 Needle arc welder.







Which should I use.

And if it is the needle arc, what wire for steel tubing, and what Current setting?

I have only used this machine (Linde)for filling in pits on nickel plates,



Thanks

Dan
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Old 03-12-2007, 05:14 PM   #54
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First you will need to remove all of the paint and rust from the two pieces. This will do two things. It will keep porosity from forming in your weld because paint vaporizes under an arc. And also it will allow your weld metal to flow. If you have a pair of Vise grips then hold the pieces with the Vice Grips on the opposite side that you are going to tack weld. You may also want to grind away the edges or bevel the edges of the parts so that you have a place to add metal. There is a good chance that you will have to grind off some of the weld that you put on in order to make the part fit again. You may also have to drill out the mounting hole if it gets distorted from welding.

As far as machines go I am not very framiliar with the Linde welder. If it is a MIG welder then go get some .035 inch diameter L-56 weld wire (or use the blue Max wire) and use that machine. You will set your machine to 150 inches per minute for wire feed speed, and about 18 volts.

If you stick weld it then use a 3/32 inch diameter electrode set at DC+ and 70 Amps would be a good setting to start with. It will be easier if you MIG weld it but you can always grind it back if you don't get it right on the first try.

Good luck! And post some pictures of your work.
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Old 03-12-2007, 09:47 PM   #55
gsweave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
First you will need to remove all of the paint and rust from the two pieces. This will do two things. It will keep porosity from forming in your weld because paint vaporizes under an arc. And also it will allow your weld metal to flow. If you have a pair of Vise grips then hold the pieces with the Vice Grips on the opposite side that you are going to tack weld. You may also want to grind away the edges or bevel the edges of the parts so that you have a place to add metal. There is a good chance that you will have to grind off some of the weld that you put on in order to make the part fit again. You may also have to drill out the mounting hole if it gets distorted from welding.

As far as machines go I am not very framiliar with the Linde welder. If it is a MIG welder then go get some .035 inch diameter L-56 weld wire (or use the blue Max wire) and use that machine. You will set your machine to 150 inches per minute for wire feed speed, and about 18 volts.

If you stick weld it then use a 3/32 inch diameter electrode set at DC+ and 70 Amps would be a good setting to start with. It will be easier if you MIG weld it but you can always grind it back if you don't get it right on the first try.

Good luck! And post some pictures of your work.


The Linde is another really old Plasma welder.

I will stick with the 3/32 McKay GP rods and the DC welder.

I will post up work process photo's.

Thanks for your input.
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Old 03-13-2007, 07:50 AM   #56
BENRON
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I have a panasonic 260P gunslinger which is the combo Mig/Plasma cutter machine. It will intermittantly trip the breaker in the garage's panel when I first flip it on. The problem has been reduced, But not eliminated, with the use of a 25' extension cord rated for the amperage.

I've gone so far as to replace the breaker the welder called for (40 or 50 amps I think) to 100 amps and it still trips every once in awhile.

The breaker only trips on startup of the machine, Not in use.

what can I do to fix this annoying problem?
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Old 03-13-2007, 08:21 AM   #57
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Great posts. I have a 140 V inverter I use with sticks and after trying various electrodes I have found the easiest to get good results with is for me the Arosta 4462 electrode. It seems to flow well, makes a strong ductile welds and is self cleaning. It is expensive but for hobby user cost is not an issue. My question is are there other electrodes with similar or even better properties ?
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Old 03-13-2007, 08:59 AM   #58
CR_TurboGuy
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New to all this. Lincoln SP175, not the plus. Welding 16ga steel tubing. .25 wire. About what settings should I use, and what pressure should I set the gas at (CO2/Argon mix)?

--JOsh
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Old 03-13-2007, 11:22 AM   #59
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benp1981
I have a panasonic 260P gunslinger which is the combo Mig/Plasma cutter machine. It will intermittantly trip the breaker in the garage's panel when I first flip it on. The problem has been reduced, But not eliminated, with the use of a 25' extension cord rated for the amperage.

I've gone so far as to replace the breaker the welder called for (40 or 50 amps I think) to 100 amps and it still trips every once in awhile.

The breaker only trips on startup of the machine, Not in use.

what can I do to fix this annoying problem?
The extension cord is what is hurting you. Plug the unit directly into the wall. You probably have a capacitor bank that is trying to load up along with the cooling fan kicking in. You can't use an extention cord if you want to draw the minumum amount of amperage from the wall outlet.

It could also be the machine protecting itself from low input voltage. Another reason to not use an extension cord.
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Old 03-13-2007, 11:28 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trond
Great posts. I have a 140 V inverter I use with sticks and after trying various electrodes I have found the easiest to get good results with is for me the Arosta 4462 electrode. It seems to flow well, makes a strong ductile welds and is self cleaning. It is expensive but for hobby user cost is not an issue. My question is are there other electrodes with similar or even better properties ?
I see you are in the mideast. That means that you probably have choices of electrode that are completely different then the ones in the US. The Arosta 4462 is a E2209-16 duplex stainless steel electrode so you have an all purpose stainless rod that will do anything. I'd say you can only go down from what you already have.

Todd
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