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Old 04-13-2009, 05:13 PM   #916
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumbydave
Ok either stupid question or Y'all got nuthin" ......
I guess its just the usual turn it down small rod and keep it clean...
guess I'm on my own as usual. looks like everyone here is into the mig/tig "glue gun"

SEE YA
The limitations of stick welding on sheet metal is burnthrough.

Go buy some Fleetweld 180 and read the directions. The invention of mig has stopped the manufacturers from making any improvements for stick welding on sheet metal.

You could try using a heat stick behind the sheet that you are trying to weld. Again most stick electrodes need at least 50 amps to run.

Read more about stick electrode selection here.
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/p...ature/c210.pdf
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Old 04-14-2009, 02:30 PM   #917
RayS
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What welder

Hi KTM640
I read the first 6 pages of this thread before realising there were a further 50 pages to go!
My question is real basic so I'm sorry if its already been addressed somewhere!
I'm setting up a home shop and want a general purpose welder to repair old bikes maybe make a trailor and might get into aluminium as well as steel.
So what do I need?
A stick/arc welder, a TIG, a MIG or what?
When do you use any one of the above types in preference to the others?

Cheers from the UK

Ray
BMW1150GSA, KTM 250Exc-f, Greeves 250 Hawkstone
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Old 04-14-2009, 05:48 PM   #918
B.Curvin
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Question for the masses, which should I go for?

This? For 1,350.00.
http://www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/diversion_165/
(no stick capability with this one.


Or this? For 1,874.00 (the 208-230V Runner package).
http://www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/syncrowave_200/

Both new from my local dealer.

I plan on doing motorcyle related stuff, subframes, maybe whole frames.

I might possibly use it in restoring an old Jeep too.

TIA
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Old 04-14-2009, 10:03 PM   #919
tundrawolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
Do you have a question about welding?

Todd
Welding Engineer
I do, actually! Years back my dad bought a Craftsman 115v welder with linear heat adjustment, it was the best 115v and even better than some 220v welders I have used, as far as flux core goes!

What the heck is up with everyone going to the 4 position heat selectors? When you need a setting between them, you are hosed! I don't get it! It drives me insane just thinking about it.

I have seen Chicago Electric 115v inverter stick welders for sale-I am planning on getting one and using it as my power supply for my Lincoln 115v flux core welder. The inverter welder is linear in its amps adjustment.
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Old 04-14-2009, 10:18 PM   #920
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
Go buy some Fleetweld 180 and read the directions. The invention of mig has stopped the manufacturers from making any improvements for stick welding on sheet metal.

You could try using a heat stick behind the sheet that you are trying to weld. Again most stick electrodes need at least 50 amps to run.

Read more about stick electrode selection here.
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/p...ature/c210.pdf
That's for sure about the halted development, at least for the thin gauge material. Looks like there's enough variations of sticks for heavier-gauge material.

Dave, you can also try Lincoln Fleetweld 37 (aka: 6013) in the 1/16" size. Also, 6013 is a good flux chemistry for thin sheet.

These others below aren't a bad choice either. Not a mainstream source, but the 6013 work OK at 20-30A on 16ga. Gotta move the torch fast though, about 1inch/sec, and you pretty much can't run the bead to the edge without making a big hole.

1/16" AWS E6013 Electrodes, 2 Lb. - $5.99
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=96812


1/16" AWS E7014 Electrodes, 2 Lb. - $5.99
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=96813



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Old 04-15-2009, 09:28 AM   #921
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I just wanted to thank everyone who posted suggestions to my threads. I was finally able to run some beads and control the arc last night.

The changes I made were:

raising the amps to 70-75
Grinding the tungsten on the fine wheel
Stick-out @ 1/8"
and I stopped using welding magnets
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Old 04-15-2009, 06:16 PM   #922
B.Curvin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVMango
Question for the masses, which should I go for?

This? For 1,350.00.
http://www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/diversion_165/
(no stick capability with this one.


Or this? For 1,874.00 (the 208-230V Runner package).
http://www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/syncrowave_200/

Both new from my local dealer.

I plan on doing motorcyle related stuff, subframes, maybe whole frames.

I might possibly use it in restoring an old Jeep too.

TIA


Anyone? Bueller? (no not you Bueller).
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Old 04-15-2009, 06:46 PM   #923
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hey if ya got the cash that 200 looks like a damn nice machine. Pulse too.


We have a bunch of older syncrowave 200's at work that refuse to die.
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Old 04-16-2009, 02:28 PM   #924
Fishyhead
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The only reason I bought a Miller Dynasty 200 over the Syncrowave 200 is because I do not have 220V in the garage and it isn't my house to mess with.
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:16 PM   #925
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayS
Hi KTM640
I read the first 6 pages of this thread before realising there were a further 50 pages to go!
My question is real basic so I'm sorry if its already been addressed somewhere!
I'm setting up a home shop and want a general purpose welder to repair old bikes maybe make a trailor and might get into aluminium as well as steel.
So what do I need?
A stick/arc welder, a TIG, a MIG or what?
When do you use any one of the above types in preference to the others?

Cheers from the UK

Ray
BMW1150GSA, KTM 250Exc-f, Greeves 250 Hawkstone



Here is the perfect garage machine that will weld anything you want.
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Cat...t.aspx?p=50178#






NASCAR® Technical Institute Relies on Lincoln®
Eclipsing its status as the fastest growing sport in the United States, NASCAR® has become one of the nation's largest businesses, boasting more than $3 billion in annual revenue.

NASCAR® racing as a sport has developed into an entertainment and marketing giant with a supporting culture that extends its southern roots well into America's mainstream. But now, with some 40 top-level multi-driver racing teams competing 10 months a year, NASCAR® can no longer rely on local tradesmen and friends of the pit crew to staff the massive workforce needed to drive the industry.
Top race shops often employ more than 200 highly skilled technicians year round to design, weld and test the dozen or more racecars each driver needs for a full season-and, that doesn't include the support staff that travels from track to track each weekend.
Based on the demand for more technically trained workers, an idea was hatched for the NASCAR Technical Institute, based in "Race City USA", Mooresville, North Carolina, the sport's suburban hometown 30 miles north of Charlotte. There, thousands of students learn core automotive training before they strike an arc on one of the authentic racecars parked on the school's workshop floor.
The $12-million, 146,000-square-foot complex is the first of its kind in the world, capable of housing some 1,900 students. The school floor even looks like a top race shop, fully equipped with the same equipment the pros use, including a full array of welding equipment from Lincoln Electric®.
Six-hour classes include everything from basic welding and metal bending to building suspensions and engines from scratch. Many instructors are race veterans straight from the pits of winning teams, offering insight found nowhere else.
The institute is part of a larger organization, United Technical Institute, which has vocational schools located across the country. Individual programs run from 42 to 78 weeks, depending on curriculum selected. Each course is three weeks long, and the school is designed so that every three weeks one group graduates while another begins.
It's a production line turning out skilled workers who will go on to staff local dealerships, garages, regional race teams and a myriad of minor racing circuits across the country. The very best go on to staff NASCAR® teams.
Upon graduation, some students who are qualified and interested in pursuing a career with a high-end manufacturer, such as BMW or Jaguar, are given the opportunity to enter a training program sponsored by the manufacturer.
Students travel from all over the country to live in temporary housing in and around Mooresville for about a year. They learn from the best, said the school's Community/NASCAR® Team Director, John Dodson, a 23-year racing veteran, who helped Richard Petty and Rusty Wallace capture dozens of victories.
"There is no other place like this," he said. "Our relationships with NASCAR® teams help us place the top students all the time. But more often, it's the race teams calling us for help."
Welding is a major component of the racing curriculum, Dodson said. In addition to equipment, Lincoln Electric® provides the institute with technical support, training guides, manuals, videos and loaned instructors.
Installed Lincoln® welding and cutting equipment includes several compact MIG welders, Precision TIG® TIG welders, Power MIG® MIG welders for thicker material and a Pro-Cut® plasma cutter for fast cuts on any conductive material.
The institute offers hands-on welding instruction for TIG and MIG welding. Students learn the metallurgical properties of various materials in respect to welding, including steel, aluminum and titanium. They study the importance of proper weld penetration and deposition and the effects of weld integrity in a racecar traveling 200 miles per hour.
"Students have to know that if a part is broken, it cannot break at the weld," Dodson said. "They need to understand the importance of a sound weld, and that a driver's life is on the line."
Building racecars for NASCAR® is one of the most involved aspects of the sport. Each car can cost $175,000, much of which is paid to in-house welding labor. As the technology embedded in the cars becomes more complex, in the form of increasingly lighter, stronger, more exotic materials, the need for well-trained welders grows exponentially.
"Welding is a skill with perhaps the greatest potential for employment in NASCAR® racing," Dodson noted. "The teams are always looking for good welders. Exposure to racecar fabrication issues puts these students at a distinct advantage."
Safety lies at the core of the welding curriculum, and environmental systems play a substantial role in that instruction. A shop-wide Lincoln® central fume extraction system allows the placement of fully adjustable low vacuum fume extraction arms in each of the 15 welding booths. Fume extraction is mandated for all welding work, he added.
"These stations go all day long, so we wanted to be sure we were properly handling welding fume. We wanted a comprehensive welding solution, including arc welding equipment, fume control, and dedicated welding booths," he said. "We chose the same welding equipment that most of the better NASCAR® teams use, and it's easy to learn on, too. That's a big advantage in a learning environment."
Dodson said that using easily maneuverable low-vacuum fume extraction arms for every weld is as engrained into a student's safety protocol as a helmet.
"Setting up the fume extraction system is just something every student must do before getting started," he said.
Zac Teuscher knows that well. He graduated from the NASCAR® Institute in the spring of 2005 and considered environmental safety a major issue when choosing a school.
"Working in a safe environment was a key consideration for me," he said. "And now that I'm in the racing industry, it's important that I maintain the same standards for my own well being."
Raised in suburban Cleveland, Teuscher was a racing fan, who learned about the institute after high school. He enrolled, graduated and went on to study advanced racecar welding at one of Lincoln's® Motorsports seminars also in suburban Cleveland.
"I learned so much from my whole experience, and the Lincoln® school was a big part of that," he said.
Teuscher now is a full-time welder for Thore Racing, a Craftsman® Truck Series team based in Sandusky, Ohio, not far from his hometown. He said the team is building a new state-of-the-art facility that will include environmental welding fume vacuum systems like the ones he used at NTI.
While the NTI school was developed to supply badly needed help for NASCAR®, most graduates head back home in search of high-paying dealership jobs. But it's not a bad consolation, Dodson noted. For many students, a hometown job is their goal, and most students find themselves in a good position to achieve that.
For Teuscher, he considers himself luckier than most. He found a job in racing and close to home. "It's the best of both worlds," he said. "But I think, had the NASCAR® Technical Institute not been there, I'd probably still be living at home wondering what to do with myself."

View/Print/Download PDF version of this story
Want to see results like this? We can help. Ask Lincoln How!
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:33 PM   #926
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf
I do, actually! Years back my dad bought a Craftsman 115v welder with linear heat adjustment, it was the best 115v and even better than some 220v welders I have used, as far as flux core goes!

What the heck is up with everyone going to the 4 position heat selectors? When you need a setting between them, you are hosed! I don't get it! It drives me insane just thinking about it.

I have seen Chicago Electric 115v inverter stick welders for sale-I am planning on getting one and using it as my power supply for my Lincoln 115v flux core welder. The inverter welder is linear in its amps adjustment.
If you want a machine like the old Craftsman then buy a mig welder with a continuous voltage control rather than a "tapped" style voltage adjustment knob.

A tapped switch to control the voltage on the front panel of the welder sets the voltage of the machine. The machine will keep the arc length at that voltage value. Since you have to spread out the voltage values into four taps it makes the machine only have four settings.

In order to make the best of this short coming you have to adjust the wire feed speed of your mig welder to match up with the voltage tap that you are using.

A continuous voltage knob like the old craftsman that you describe has an infinintly controlable arc voltage adjustment. It makes it easier to dial in the right voltage to the wire feed speed that you have set the machine to.

In the case of a Lincoln MIG welder the 140C and 180C Power MIG's have C in the name to describe "continuous" voltage adjustment.
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:41 PM   #927
KTM640Dakar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVMango
Anyone? Bueller? (no not you Bueller).

Bueller read this........

http://content.lincolnelectric.com/p...and_mc0886.pdf
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Old 04-19-2009, 07:00 AM   #928
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
Turn your machine down with the foot petal using a max of 120 Amps when fully depressed.,

Smaller rod = smaller welds.

Sharp Tungsten = smaller welds.

Get comfortable, setup the part so you can focus on it rather than your balance.

Tack it first, and get it straight and the metal touching along the entire weld length.

If you have a pulse capability on your TIG welder use it. It can help you time your addition of filler rod and make your welds look even.
Funny you mention comfort. I just built a work station and prior to that I've been standing while welding. I'll be able to sit now and relax a bit when I'm practicing on this thin stuff.

I bought a precision TIG. Pulse is new to me. What setting should I start at for this exercise?

Thanks!
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Old 04-19-2009, 10:49 AM   #929
B.Curvin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar

Your Lincoln comparison





Millers comparison






Why, when comparing duty cycles, does Lincoln use an amperage setting that

is only 60% of the Miller setting?
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Old 04-19-2009, 02:07 PM   #930
tundrawolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTM640Dakar
If you want a machine like the old Craftsman then buy a mig welder with a continuous voltage control rather than a "tapped" style voltage adjustment knob.

A tapped switch to control the voltage on the front panel of the welder sets the voltage of the machine. The machine will keep the arc length at that voltage value. Since you have to spread out the voltage values into four taps it makes the machine only have four settings.

In order to make the best of this short coming you have to adjust the wire feed speed of your mig welder to match up with the voltage tap that you are using.

A continuous voltage knob like the old craftsman that you describe has an infinintly controlable arc voltage adjustment. It makes it easier to dial in the right voltage to the wire feed speed that you have set the machine to.

In the case of a Lincoln MIG welder the 140C and 180C Power MIG's have C in the name to describe "continuous" voltage adjustment.

Thank you sir!!!!
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