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Old 05-12-2009, 10:41 PM   #961
Zecatfish
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Stupid Question time....

Ok I want to weld sheet metal, like on a gas tank.
I only got a Lincoln Arc Welder (sticks) and I can weld heavier stuff ok, but if I try to use it weld sheet metal I make more holes than welds.

Would a cheap Flux Wire Welder, like this one from Harbor Freight:
90 Amp Flux Wire Welder, MIG 100
Be suitable for welding sheet metal?
I've never used a wire feed type welder before and I don't alot of extra money to spend a bunch on a good Mig/Tig/etc with an Argon bottle.

So what do you think?
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Old 05-12-2009, 11:42 PM   #962
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf
If you know someone who has a VARIAC transformer you could see at the *exact* point when your radio loses it's stations, and check your voltmeter against that reading.

Talk about overkill for a simple problem!
I laughed when I read this one.

When checking lightbulbs, do you bring them into a lab for X-rays, or do you plug them in?
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Old 05-13-2009, 07:58 AM   #963
studley
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That is what I was thinking also. But this is just a "tig" thing right? Can I set the machine to not have a high frequency start?




Quote:
Originally Posted by Strong Bad
Prolly electromagnetic voodoo from the soft start aka high frequency start.
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:01 AM   #964
studley
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Sorry no batteries on this one. The old radio that sat "over there" worked just fine. I just wanted a bigger sound system so I put the old one from the house in. Now I can hear the music over the compressor.



Quote:
Originally Posted by P B G
Can your radio take a few batteries in it?

That of course could hold your presets.
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:08 AM   #965
studley
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Well, if I unplug the radio it does not work at all. While this solves one problem it creates another in that the music stops.

I know what you are getting at, I was just being a smartass. The wiring is all new from a contractor I trust to do the job right. This was one job I had no problem paying someone else to do. The last radio worked fine with the tig. It just would not stay on station for very long. I was trying to get more sound to drown out the compressor. Works great but for this one thing.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf
Let me ask you something... Does this same thing happen when you unplug the radio? If so, do us a favor and bring an extension cord plugged into the other outlet over to your work. Plug a voltmeter into the extension cord and note the voltage drop (You may have to put a bright light over the voltmeter so you can see the reading, or have a friend tell you what it says) with the MIG Vs. TIG.

If the voltage drop is more than 20+- volts, (I'm just throwing out a number, someone with more experience can tell you what an unhealthy drop should be) I'd imagine your welder is simply pulling more juice in TIG mode, and thusly dropping the voltage down below the minimum memory retention voltage. You may want to invest in having your wiring to your welder upgraded so the drop is not so much.

Edit: P B G has a great suggestion. Also, if you know someone who has a VARIAC transformer you could see at the *exact* point when your radio loses it's stations, and check your voltmeter against that reading.
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:29 AM   #966
Strong Bad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zecatfish
Ok I want to weld sheet metal, like on a gas tank.
I only got a Lincoln Arc Welder (sticks) and I can weld heavier stuff ok, but if I try to use it weld sheet metal I make more holes than welds.

Would a cheap Flux Wire Welder, like this one from Harbor Freight:
90 Amp Flux Wire Welder, MIG 100
Be suitable for welding sheet metal?
I've never used a wire feed type welder before and I don't alot of extra money to spend a bunch on a good Mig/Tig/etc with an Argon bottle.

So what do you think?
Total waste of your money.

Mig welding "sheet metal" is only slightly better than arc/"stick" welding. And the thinner the gauge the worse it gets. While gas shielded mig works great for tacking sheet metal together, welding a constant bead is another matter. Flux core mig even for tacking is not a good idea due to the clean up of the flux off of the tack required before another weld can be made. Personally I would oxy/acetelene weld a gas tank before I attempted to mig weld one. Preferably you would tig weld a gas tank.

Also, I don't by things from Harbor Freight with moving parts.
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:31 AM   #967
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studley
That is what I was thinking also. But this is just a "tig" thing right? Can I set the machine to not have a high frequency start?
Yes you can if you are not welding aluminum. I had a job for several years welding stainless and mild steel with scratch start only.
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Old 05-13-2009, 09:56 AM   #968
xymotic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studley
Well, if I unplug the radio it does not work at all. While this solves one problem it creates another in that the music stops.

I know what you are getting at, I was just being a smartass. The wiring is all new from a contractor I trust to do the job right. This was one job I had no problem paying someone else to do. The last radio worked fine with the tig. It just would not stay on station for very long. I was trying to get more sound to drown out the compressor. Works great but for this one thing.
if you have a ups for your computer you could try putting it on the radio. YOu could at least determine if it's a small voltage drop that killing it (and maybe that can be fixed with a cheap ups) vs weird high freq interference, which will take you a lot longer to arrange the aluminum foil on the walls 'just right'
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Old 05-13-2009, 12:00 PM   #969
tundrawolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strong Bad
Total waste of your money.

Mig welding "sheet metal" is only slightly better than arc/"stick" welding. And the thinner the gauge the worse it gets. While gas shielded mig works great for tacking sheet metal together, welding a constant bead is another matter. Flux core mig even for tacking is not a good idea due to the clean up of the flux off of the tack required before another weld can be made. Personally I would oxy/acetelene weld a gas tank before I attempted to mig weld one. Preferably you would tig weld a gas tank.

Also, I don't by things from Harbor Freight with moving parts.
Exactly what I was thinking... I am going to be adding some capacity to the fuel tank of my V star 1100, and the first thing that popped into my mind was oxyacetyline. Also, FCAW will penetrate right through sheetmetal at least more often than MIG.
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Old 05-13-2009, 05:57 PM   #970
Zecatfish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strong Bad
Total waste of your money.

Mig welding "sheet metal" is only slightly better than arc/"stick" welding. And the thinner the gauge the worse it gets. While gas shielded mig works great for tacking sheet metal together, welding a constant bead is another matter. Flux core mig even for tacking is not a good idea due to the clean up of the flux off of the tack required before another weld can be made. Personally I would oxy/acetelene weld a gas tank before I attempted to mig weld one. Preferably you would tig weld a gas tank.

Also, I don't by things from Harbor Freight with moving parts.
Thanks that is what I wanted to know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tundrawolf
Exactly what I was thinking... I am going to be adding some capacity to the fuel tank of my V star 1100, and the first thing that popped into my mind was oxyacetyline. Also, FCAW will penetrate right through sheetmetal at least more often than MIG.

Ok stupid question part two. Only thing I use torch for is cutting and brazing. How about a short synopsis of the process and what rods do I need to buy?

I got a torch no problemo there.
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Old 05-13-2009, 06:03 PM   #971
tundrawolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippii
Talk about overkill for a simple problem!
I laughed when I read this one.

When checking lightbulbs, do you bring them into a lab for X-rays, or do you plug them in?
Don't be silly!

I do what everyone else does, I take them into a cleanroom where there is as much vacuum as inside the bulb, drill a small hole in the glass, and put nanites into the bulb to inspect, and possibly repair. If the nanites cannot repair the bulb, I seal up the hole and throw it away.
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Old 05-13-2009, 06:14 PM   #972
tundrawolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zecatfish
Thanks that is what I wanted to know.




Ok stupid question part two. Only thing I use torch for is cutting and brazing. How about a short synopsis of the process and what rods do I need to buy?

I got a torch no problemo there.
You need to get standard mild steel filler rod, they will be gold in color-that is a copper coating to keep them from rusting.

What you need to do is select the right torch tip, it will be pretty small, I am personally unsure of the number for gauge, but you will quickly get a feel for it.

You want to keep the flame from actually touching the metal, but keep it maybe 1mm +- from it. What you are looking for is the "puddle" or "pool", to begin to form.

Honestly, practice without the rods, what you do is form a pool on one piece of metal, and gently coax it (With the flame-be careful not to touch the flame to the metal or the pool) to the other piece of metal. You can begin to form another pool on the second piece, going back and forth, keeping both pools "wet", until you are able to coax them together.

When they touch, they will instantly meld together. The feeling you get when they meld is not something I able to go into detail about on this family oriented board, but it is a good feeling.

Once melded, you can move on and begin the next pool, however this time you now have a seam to work from, and it will be easier.

If it takes 10 minutes at 10 lbs acetylene and 30 pounds oxygen to get a pool, your torch needs to go up a size. If it burns through, you need to go down a size.

Practice practice practice. Once you master oxyacetylene welding you can use just about any other process of welding. You have total control with OAC.

Also, it will take you 10 minutes to do a 10" weld, where with MIG it would take you a few seconds, however your weld will be cleaner, and oh so much more satisfying.

Edit to add: Filler rods can make a bad weld look great. That's why you should start with just fusion-welding the metal together. Here's a little something I found that I hope helps you:

http://www.type2.com/library/body/wlsh.htm

tundrawolf screwed with this post 05-13-2009 at 06:29 PM
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Old 05-13-2009, 07:52 PM   #973
WIsixfitty
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Torch tip size will be either "0" or "00".

General rule of thumb is light the acet and adjust flow so it's just above being sooty(sp?). Next turn on Oxy so both blue flames just about become one brighter point. Hard to explain this with words so I hope I'me getting my point accross.

For gage material (22 thru 14) weld speed is just a touch slower or about the same as tig.


I learned myself to weld with oxy/acet many years ago working on and making expansion chambers.
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Old 05-13-2009, 09:00 PM   #974
Zecatfish
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Thanks to both of you.
You gave me something new to try.
I was going to start hacking on an old XT550 gas tank I got. Its been empty for years and bone dry inside so theres no chance of going BOOM and knocking me across the shop.
I got an old XS750 fuel tank thats going to donate its knee scallops to the cause too. I just need to cut up some metal and put it back together.
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Old 05-13-2009, 09:45 PM   #975
MichBiker
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weldin

raise of hands who is a real welder here given advise. i'm not but i get it done for what i do, i'm not makin frames.
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