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Old 05-10-2010, 01:48 PM   #1366
Pablo83
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Originally Posted by s10stealth
I'm just thinking about trying some welding and I'm looking at the 90A Flux Wire MIG from Harbor Freight. (Yes, I know, it's a throw away unit)

It says that it's good for welding material up to 1/4" thick.

Can I weld thicker material if I hit it on both sides of the material?
I've used one. I doubt it could put strong weld on 1/4" material even if you welded both sides.

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Old 05-11-2010, 05:28 AM   #1367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s10stealth
I'm just thinking about trying some welding and I'm looking at the 90A Flux Wire MIG from Harbor Freight. (Yes, I know, it's a throw away unit)

It says that it's good for welding material up to 1/4" thick.

Can I weld thicker material if I hit it on both sides of the material?
You are wasting your money. Find a used name brand welder for the same money. I have a 135 amp 110volt Lincoln unit that is pretty decent for a first mig welder. If I have to weld something thicker I use my torches and heat the metal first. I am sure you can find one of those welders used on craigslist for the same price as the harbor freight.
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Old 05-11-2010, 02:29 PM   #1368
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trailer Rails
You are wasting your money. Find a used name brand welder for the same money. I have a 135 amp 110volt Lincoln unit that is pretty decent for a first mig welder. If I have to weld something thicker I use my torches and heat the metal first. I am sure you can find one of those welders used on craigslist for the same price as the harbor freight.
I agree. You will be much happier and if you do not weld everyday you might become frustrated by a flux core welder.
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Old 05-12-2010, 07:15 AM   #1369
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Originally Posted by bmweuro
I agree. You will be much happier and if you do not weld everyday you might become frustrated by a flux core welder.
I actually enjoy a flux core setup for the occasional project. Mostly because I am usually just fixing something real quick like an exhaust hanger. I don't want to have to worry about getting it really clean. The flux core seems to deal with a little bit of rust or paint better than solid core. Don't even think about trying to TIG something that has a speck of dirt on it.
When I am working on a bigger project and I am cleaning and prepping all the weld surfaces really well then I setup the solid core or TIG it.
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Old 05-12-2010, 10:36 AM   #1370
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I'm going to make a gas tank for an old bike I'm fixing up.

A friend has an english wheel and is going to help make the panels. I'm thinking of using aluminum, but don't know much about it. What would be a good alloy to use and what thickness sheet should I start with?

Hope it's ok asking in this thread, rather than starting a new one.

Thanks, Lojack
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Old 05-12-2010, 11:00 AM   #1371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trailer Rails
I actually enjoy a flux core setup for the occasional project. Mostly because I am usually just fixing something real quick like an exhaust hanger. I don't want to have to worry about getting it really clean. The flux core seems to deal with a little bit of rust or paint better than solid core. Don't even think about trying to TIG something that has a speck of dirt on it.
When I am working on a bigger project and I am cleaning and prepping all the weld surfaces really well then I setup the solid core or TIG it.
I use flux often when outdoors or its old rusty stuff where structural integrity matters more than beauty. On most 110v machines flux also lets you weld thicker stuff than shielded will allow. Is it the IDEAL thing? No. But it definately has a place.
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Old 05-12-2010, 04:37 PM   #1372
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s10stealth
I'm just thinking about trying some welding and I'm looking at the 90A Flux Wire MIG from Harbor Freight. (Yes, I know, it's a throw away unit)

It says that it's good for welding material up to 1/4" thick.

Can I weld thicker material if I hit it on both sides of the material?
Go plug in the numbers with the link below. You will find that 90A HF POS welder lacks the power to weld even half that thickness. even with proper joint prep and tons of preheat your not going to make a sound weld on something 1/4 inch thick

http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...calculator.php
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Old 05-12-2010, 05:30 PM   #1373
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s10stealth
I'm just thinking about trying some welding and I'm looking at the 90A Flux Wire MIG from Harbor Freight. (Yes, I know, it's a throw away unit)

It says that it's good for welding material up to 1/4" thick.

Can I weld thicker material if I hit it on both sides of the material?
Not thicker material, at least not very easily because you may have to make multiple passes, and chip off the flux between passes. But 1/4" thick material welded from both sides, sure.

Weld from both sides, prep both sides with a partial-depth bevel. Get some brand name flux core wire, Lincoln is usually the flux core wire brand at most hardware stores.

Use the right sized tip for the wire diameter. The tip is where the electrical circuit is made. If the tip hole is larger than the wire diameter, the electrical contact will be poor.

If the workpiece is large, preheat the weld area with a propane torch. Often you don't have to preheat the entire piece, just the first couple of inches of where the bead will be going. Beyond the first couple of inches, and once you start laying down the bead, the arc puts a lot of heat into the material and that may be enough heat to finish the bead. Preheat makes a big difference when you're at the material thickness/amperage limit.

When running properly, flux core makes a messy sounding arc, and the arc is going to spatter. If the arc isn't popping and spattering, and flinging lots of red hot metal bits that must be chipped off, then fiddle with the wire speed until it does.

Practice laying some side-by-side beads on some flat 1/8" material. You'll get good practice at chipping flux that way. If the flux chips off easily, then the wire speed and torch speed are correct.

Practice keeping the 'electrode stickout' to around .250". Stickout is the length of wire sticking out of the tip, between the tip and the arc. The stickout portion of the wire (aka: the electrode) conducts the electrical current from the tip, to where the arc begins. The stickout portion of wire gets very hot because of the the current passing through it. That heat doesn't make it into the weld. Too much stickout and the wire sort of melts off into a stream of little BBs as soon as it gets to the arc.

It's hard to see the .250" stickout because of the removable 'gas nozzle' on the torch tip. Feel free to grind back some of the gas nozzle to make the torch tip, and wire stickout, more visible. Another way to get more visibility is to grind a couple vee-shaped slots across the open end of the nozzle, making 4 petals so to speak. Then squeeze the petals together collapsing the nozzle closer to the torch tip.

(Take a close look at the gas nozzle, it's made from two cone-shaped pieces of copper, with a high temperature electrical insulator sandwiched in between. The 'inside' is electrically 'hot', the outside is electrically neutral. That's something to pay attention to if you decide to reshape the nozzle for better visibility, you know, so you don't make a short circuit between the inside and outside of the nozzle.)

I guess one last thing. Metal is much stronger than you imagine. You'll be surprised how much a few good tack welds can hold, even on a permanent basis. Cars are mostly held together by spot welds you know.

Have fun.



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Old 05-12-2010, 10:40 PM   #1374
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What's the best way to oxy-propane weld aluminum?
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Old 05-13-2010, 10:07 AM   #1375
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https://www.tinmantech.com/html/vid_..._weld_alum.php

rent the dvd
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Old 05-19-2010, 12:30 PM   #1376
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Question Copper-coated mig wire bad idea?

I'm in the process of getting a Snap On welder I bought from a friend up & running, and I've been doing some background reading in preparation for actually using it. I read somewhere that the copper used for coating filler wire will contaminate your weld, but most all the wire I've seen is copper coated. What to believe: pro or anti-copper?
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Old 05-19-2010, 01:58 PM   #1377
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailhead
I'm in the process of getting a Snap On welder I bought from a friend up & running, and I've been doing some background reading in preparation for actually using it. I read somewhere that the copper used for coating filler wire will contaminate your weld, but most all the wire I've seen is copper coated. What to believe: pro or anti-copper?
I'm sure someone with more expertise than me will chime in, but in my decade of welding mild steel it has never been an issue. I have heard that it can cause some feed problems as the copper sluffs off into feed wheels......but I've never had it happen.

Assuming you're talking about a wire feed?

BTW, filler rod for ox/ac welding is almost always copper coated as well. I've used it with great results as well.
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:13 PM   #1378
Pablo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailhead
I'm in the process of getting a Snap On welder I bought from a friend up & running, and I've been doing some background reading in preparation for actually using it. I read somewhere that the copper used for coating filler wire will contaminate your weld, but most all the wire I've seen is copper coated. What to believe: pro or anti-copper?
I've never had an issue with it. It might not pass aviation standards, but the vast majority of non-professional welders have copper coated wire in their MIG welders. If you use non-coated wire you will need to keep it completely rust free. This is difficult to do unless you use all the wire in less than a month or so.
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Old 05-20-2010, 07:51 PM   #1379
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Cool-- very helpful.

Thanks.
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Old 05-21-2010, 06:51 AM   #1380
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The suppliers wouldn't make it and the welding stores wouldn't sell it if the copper coating was a problem under "normal" conditions. That goes for gas, tig and mig.
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