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Old 07-20-2014, 05:56 AM   #1
groundrules OP
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Hey, so I'm replacing sink/countertops, and have discovered that the shutoff valves under the sink no longer shut off. They're fooked. So I need to replace, which means shutting off the water to the house, which means I want this to process to be fast & have a relatively good chance of being done right on the first try. I've never sweated copper pipe, and while I think it's probably within my capacity, I'm not dying to cut my teeth with a torch under the sink when I want this DONE fast.

So, do it with solder, or can I get away with Sharkbite connections? they seem too good to be true...

thanks for input. I know there are more fun things to read about around here.
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:07 AM   #2
Langanobob
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I have only limited experience with Sharkbites. I bought tubing, several valves and fittings and the compression tool and re-plumbed an old Shasta camp trailer. It was easy to do and so far after a few trips it works fine.
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:41 AM   #3
Wasser
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Shut the main water off and then replace the under counter shuts off(s) to the sink with new style, 90 degree, ball valves.

The old compression fitting ferrule can remain. Use it for the new valve.

Then, braided risers from the new valves to your new sink.


Or, are your sink shut off actually soldered to the pipes?
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:41 AM   #4
Jedi Apprentice
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I used shark bites over three years ago for an under sink application for same reason. They worked great!
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:50 AM   #5
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How old are the valves? They have been mostly compression fittings for a long time. You should not need to solder. Sharkbites have worked well for me.
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:54 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasser View Post
Or, are your sink shut off actually soldered to the pipes?
yeah, this. suuuucks!
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:56 AM   #7
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Quote:
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How old are the valves? They have been mostly compression fittings for a long time. You should not need to solder. Sharkbites have worked well for me.
Not sure on the age- house is new to me. Valves are soldered to the copper pipe.
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:56 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Apprentice View Post
I used shark bites over three years ago for an under sink application for same reason. They worked great!
ahhh, a testimonial! Thanks.
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Old 07-20-2014, 07:52 AM   #9
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Shark bites

I started selling them years ago and have them under my kitchen sink. There copper pipe was painted so it is a bitch to clean and get a good solder joint. I think they are great and would recommend them every time to anyone. They have come down in price but are still a bit pricy, but if you can't solder then this is the way to go. Supper easy to install. Either cut the valve off and clean up the copper pipe so the are no burrs inside or out. Slid on the shark bite and your done, just that easy.
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Old 07-20-2014, 07:55 AM   #10
Wasser
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Quote:
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Or, are your sink shut off actually soldered to the pipes?
Quote:
Originally Posted by groundrules View Post
yeah, this. suuuucks!
Understand.

You still need to get the old valve off. Either by cutting (hopefully the stub is long enough afterwards) or heating up the old one to remove it.

You can clean the old solder off with a leather glove and a rag while the old solder is hot. Use a cotton shop rag, not a syntethic rag. Those just melt and make a bigger mess. Follow up with some emory cloth for a clean pipe.

Sometimes, you can grab the old shut off and pull an extra inch or more of the copper pipe stub out of the wall. Use an mini imp pipe cutter.



Then, you could install a new style, 90 degree ball valve with a compression fitting.

Or a SharkBite.

I have used SharkBite before. Even in the facilities I manage. Plumber had to use one a while back on an overhead, domestic water line. Too tricky to solder in a new fitting. He was on an extension ladder, through a removed ceiling tile in an office. Roof deck insulation was too close by, just about zero room to work, not enough slack in the existing line. Real PITA. Used a SharkBite. Has worked perfectly.
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Old 07-20-2014, 08:27 AM   #11
Louis Wambsganss
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I've used them quite a bit in 3/4" and 1/2". Never leaked a drop. I've even disassembled a few and reinstalled. Still, no leaks. I wouldn't hesitate to use them again.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:02 AM   #12
k-moe
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Most of the older valves are rebuildable. Have you called a plumbing supplier to see if parts are available for yours?
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Old 07-20-2014, 01:14 PM   #13
emti
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They are lifesavers, I use them at work when water cannot be completely shut off, and on one occasion installed a valve with the water running (yes I got a bath) The piping in my home is exposed and all the fittings are shark bites or the competitions equiivalents. I think you only need about a 1 1/2 stub.emti
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Old 07-20-2014, 03:17 PM   #14
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I just used a pair today putting in a water heater for my wife's cousin. They were easy and didn't leak. I was half expecting them to blow off and spray water all over. The directions say to mark 15/16" down the pipe and push them to that point. I'm pretty strong and couldn't get them to the mark on either tube. My eyes aren't as good as they used to be so I might have made the mark in the wrong place. They sure didn't leak though.
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Old 07-20-2014, 03:45 PM   #15
Stan_R80/7
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If you can't cut off the old leaking valve, then it will need to be desoldered. That means cutting off the water, making a heat shield (so you don't burn anything under your sink), and removing the valve packing. When going through all that, installing another solder connection valve is not so much trouble (i.e. all the prep was done to remove the old valve).

I haven't used sharkbite connection fittings and valves, but they seem high quality. I could have used one this last winter when the same outside water line froze and burst twice. Another line and valve were soldered in place, but sharkbite fittings would have made the job quicker. Good luck!
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