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Old 04-20-2012, 05:55 AM   #5341
psu75
Carpe Diemer
 
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Joined: Jan 2012
Location: Houston!! Finally!
Oddometer: 91
My tires - ugh

Well, the new tires finally made their way onto my bike. So I bought the tires. Bought some very large tire irons/spoons, bought some smaller ones as used in videos that folks have posted in the threads here, bought my bead buddy, bought the core remover for the valve stem, bought the tubes... Read many different threads and posts, watched tons of videos, printed out guides...

So yeah, I was ready to change those tires!

Two hours later...the front tire is changed. So,okay, getting the tire off the rim was a snap! No problem there! I had that sucker off in about 15 minutes. Getting the new one on and getting the tube back in without destroying it (which I ceremoniously managed to pinch, $18.00 out the window) proved to be quite a bit more difficult.

Two hours later, 4 tire spoons, a very large screw driver, the bead buddy and I were still trying to tug that last section of tire up over the rim. FINALLY!! WOO HOO! I did it! Time for air! So I use a foot pump to start slowly. Nothing... Okay, impatience sets in a little at this point. I fire up the air compressor and start pumping away...nothing. AUGH!!! That's when I realized I must have pinched the tube.

So, I put away the 4 tire spoons. I put away the bead buddy. I put away the valve stem core remover. I put away all the tools I took out to take the tire off the bike (after I'd put the tire back on the bike). I picked up my phone and called the local shop and scheduled an appointment to have my tires done.

So, lessons learned:

1. If you're a beginner - those little 10" tire spoons just ain't gonna get the job done...Get some big ones to go along with those small ones. You're going to need them to pull the last section of tire up and over the rim.
2. Buy extra tubes. Yep, they're expensive but it beats the frustration of not having an extra one on hand when you do *and you will* pinch one.
3. Getting the tire off the rim is the easy part. Getting it back on is a whole other animal.. . That last little section, about 7" worth of tire that needs to slip up over that rim...not pretty, and it sure as hell doesn't look like it's supposed to be able to do what you're about to make it do!
4. Have your local shop phone number handy. You never know what you might need and maybe they have stuff on hand for you. In my case they had to order the tubes, so I was out of luck there.

Total cost: $322

Tires: $75
Tire spoons: Big set $50, Small set $35
Bead Buddy: $10
Core remover: $6
Tubes: Front $18, Back $28
Shop Labor: $100

I could have just paid the $143 at the shop to start with but I learned a few lessons in the process...

All in all it was an excellent learning experience. I gave in and took it to the shop for a few reasons. One, I didn't have the time to fart around with it any more. I'm getting ready to move to Texas and that's taking a lot of my time. Plus right now I split my time between PA and NYC so I'm not home that much to begin with. Another reason is that when I looked at all the stuff that had to come off when I took the back wheel off, I was worried I'd mess something up and I didn't have anyone to check my work after I was done to make sure it was right. If it wasn't right and I took it out for a ride (I ride mostly on the road) that could be disastrous for me.

I'd suggest that anyone give it a try. But for me, I'll stick with the shop doing it for me. I'll continue to change my own oil and small things like that, but the stuff that could kill me...I'll leave it to the pros.
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Old 04-20-2012, 08:43 AM   #5342
Wallrat
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Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Orange County, Ca
Oddometer: 501
Jesus you need a new shop. I've got 3 shops within 20 minutes of me and the most expensive one is $25 per wheel to change the tire/tube if you didn't buy the tire from them.

1st tire change is evil. 2nd one sucks. 3rd one is crap but somehow seems less painful. By the time you've done as many as I have you still hate doing them but its 20 minutes + 1 tube instead of hours + several runs to the shop. FYI I pinched 2 tubes my first change too. Since then I've only pinched a tube once, so it does get easier! Tubes get pinched either when you don't make sure they're up inside when you slide the tire on or when you put too much iron into the wheel. Need to learn to just put the tip on the rim and then twist it out and away from the tube. Also you tend to overuse the irons when you first start. You can actually do most of the tire change with your bare hands.

Anyway don't give up. There will be a day when you're on the trail and you'll be glad for all the time you spent learning in the garage.

Edit: In regards to the prices you paid...
Check RMATV for your parts before ever going to a stealership. I just bought a set of small spoons from them for $3.50 each. Big spoons are <$10 each. Their order processing is retardedly fast - If you order before 5pm their time its almost a sure thing it'll be on a UPS truck that day. I usually get my parts from them before the stealership can get em.

http://www.rockymountainatv.com
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Wallrat screwed with this post 04-20-2012 at 08:51 AM
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:16 AM   #5343
Klay
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Joined: Nov 2005
Location: right here on my thermarest
Oddometer: 100,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallrat View Post
anyway don't give up. There will be a day when you're on the trail and you'll be glad for all the time you spent learning in the garage.

+1
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:19 PM   #5344
MorganSS
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Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Kerrville Texas
Oddometer: 81
woohoo!

petcock installed, bike runs great!

it sure did seem to bring out a little more cold naturedness but Ill see if that changes a little.

got the plate on, inspected, registered, all that jazz, Im legal!

Im still running original tires from the year 2000. Inspection guy said to get new tires before these blow a knob and I wreck. I dont see any dryrot but they are really old. I was hoping they are okay, this is getting expensive.

He also said the bike is running a bit lean and needs more fuel. Any pointers or adjustments I can do to it without having to buy something?
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:21 PM   #5345
Klay
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Location: right here on my thermarest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MorganSS View Post
.

He also said the bike is running a bit lean and needs more fuel. Any pointers or adjustments I can do to it without having to buy something?
You could turn the idle screw out a little to richen it up, if it hasn't already been done.
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:59 PM   #5346
Highaltidude
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Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MorganSS View Post
He also said the bike is running a bit lean and needs more fuel. Any pointers or adjustments I can do to it without having to buy something?
Bike is notoriously lean from the factory. Rejetting will cost less than $10. Just do it right.

Chuck
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Old 04-20-2012, 08:10 PM   #5347
MorganSS
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Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Kerrville Texas
Oddometer: 81
is that the kientech package or can you link me to another jet



bike ran great today, 70 miles, 80/20 on/off
had a blast
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Old 04-21-2012, 01:46 AM   #5348
Sateev
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Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 118
Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallrat View Post
Jesus you need a new shop. I've got 3 shops within 20 minutes of me and the most expensive one is $25 per wheel to change the tire/tube if you didn't buy the tire from them.
OK, guys, please don't throw rocks, BUT...

I go to a little tire shop, where the owner is the only worker, and has changed more tires in his lifetime than can be counted. He does it all, including machine-vulcanizing patches. Of course you would have to travel to Bangkok to see me there, and get the price:

Remove and re-install BOTH front and rear wheels, install new front and rear tires: 140 baht = US$4.66!!

And this guy knows his stuff. My man, Mr. Amorn!

And another guy made me a new clutch cable from my old sleeve (since buying one would take at least two weeks), for...30 baht=US$1.00!

All this and Thai food - hate to rub it in...
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Old 04-21-2012, 02:36 AM   #5349
Sateev
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Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 118
Speedo insanity

So, since sometime last year, my speedo only works after being exposed to direct sunlight for a while. Otherwise, it's stuck at zero. I tried to lube the bearings, and to clean it, but all I succeeded in doing was getting oil between the magnet and the needle rotor, screwing up (until it dried) my calibration. The odometer still works fine, so I guess something is binding in the needle bearings. Too small and watch-like for me to take apart...

Meanwhile, I have been watching the Trailtech Vapor speedo/tach for a while, but always getting discouraged when I think about how to relocate the ignition switch if I dump the stock speedo/indicator assembly. I don't want some cobby-looking universal bracket leaving the wires visible, and whatever I do, I want to look as close to factory as possible.

I decided to solve the problem by designing a bracket to mount the Trailtech unit, along with the correct shape hole for the ignition switch, and a Powerlet 12V outlet (with spring-loaded waterproof cover).

After a bunch of CAD drawings, and a lot of paper dolls, I finally came up with a design out of .125" 6061-T6 aluminum, and sent it off for fab. (see preview below):

In a couple of weeks, I'll have it back and will take some pics of the install.

I already have the Vapor speedo with the plastic dashboard that holds the indicator lamps. I rewired the dashboard to an 8-pin connector to match the one on the Suzuki speedo (with appropriate changes to give me left and right turn signal indicators, a working neutral indicator, and power to the Vapor unit itself).

The speed sensor is a sticking point for me: while the one than comes with the Universal Air-cooled, Conventional Forks Trailtech kit is OK, it does require replacing one of the brake rotor bolts with a bolt with a magnet embedded. It can only be torqued to 12 lb-ft, while the other bolts should be 16.5 lb-ft (close enough, I guess), but the OEM bolt is a shoulder bolt, and the Trailtech-supplied one isn't. I really don't like this solution, and there doesn't appear to be any place to glue the loose magnet they also supply in the kit instead of the bolt.

Meanwhile, another speedo maker, Acewell, makes a cool sensor, that is made for DRZ400s, and plugs right into the speedo drive on the front hub. Only problem is that it is a Hall sensor-type (the Trailtech is a reed switch), and won't work. I bought one anyway ($20), on the chance that I could design something to make it work, because it is a much cleaner install. I'm about half-way through with the interface design (all electronic). It's going to take a while to get it made, considering where I live, so I'll run the Trailtech one for a while, but I am really determined to get the Acewell cable to work.

So, I'll post progress from time to time, and may make the bracket available if it works out as planned, and there is any interest.

Damn, it's hot here...

Have fun.
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Old 04-21-2012, 02:49 AM   #5350
Klay
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Joined: Nov 2005
Location: right here on my thermarest
Oddometer: 100,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sateev View Post
OK, guys, please don't throw rocks, BUT...

I go to a little tire shop, where the owner is the only worker, and has changed more tires in his lifetime than can be counted. He does it all, including machine-vulcanizing patches. Of course you would have to travel to Bangkok to see me there, and get the price:

Remove and re-install BOTH front and rear wheels, install new front and rear tires: 140 baht = US$4.66!!

And this guy knows his stuff. My man, Mr. Amorn!

And another guy made me a new clutch cable from my old sleeve (since buying one would take at least two weeks), for...30 baht=US$1.00!

All this and Thai food - hate to rub it in...
I've got that beat. I do all my own tire changes for flat nothing.
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Old 04-21-2012, 02:57 AM   #5351
Klay
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Joined: Nov 2005
Location: right here on my thermarest
Oddometer: 100,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by psu75 View Post
Well, the new tires finally made their way onto my bike. So I bought the tires. Bought some very large tire irons/spoons, bought some smaller ones as used in videos that folks have posted in the threads here, bought my bead buddy, bought the core remover for the valve stem, bought the tubes... Read many different threads and posts, watched tons of videos, printed out guides...

So yeah, I was ready to change those tires!

Two hours later...the front tire is changed. So,okay, getting the tire off the rim was a snap! No problem there! I had that sucker off in about 15 minutes. Getting the new one on and getting the tube back in without destroying it (which I ceremoniously managed to pinch, $18.00 out the window) proved to be quite a bit more difficult.

Two hours later, 4 tire spoons, a very large screw driver, the bead buddy and I were still trying to tug that last section of tire up over the rim. FINALLY!! WOO HOO! I did it! Time for air! So I use a foot pump to start slowly. Nothing... Okay, impatience sets in a little at this point. I fire up the air compressor and start pumping away...nothing. AUGH!!! That's when I realized I must have pinched the tube.

So, I put away the 4 tire spoons. I put away the bead buddy. I put away the valve stem core remover. I put away all the tools I took out to take the tire off the bike (after I'd put the tire back on the bike). I picked up my phone and called the local shop and scheduled an appointment to have my tires done.

So, lessons learned:

1. If you're a beginner - those little 10" tire spoons just ain't gonna get the job done...Get some big ones to go along with those small ones. You're going to need them to pull the last section of tire up and over the rim.
2. Buy extra tubes. Yep, they're expensive but it beats the frustration of not having an extra one on hand when you do *and you will* pinch one.
3. Getting the tire off the rim is the easy part. Getting it back on is a whole other animal.. . That last little section, about 7" worth of tire that needs to slip up over that rim...not pretty, and it sure as hell doesn't look like it's supposed to be able to do what you're about to make it do!
4. Have your local shop phone number handy. You never know what you might need and maybe they have stuff on hand for you. In my case they had to order the tubes, so I was out of luck there.

Total cost: $322

Tires: $75
Tire spoons: Big set $50, Small set $35
Bead Buddy: $10
Core remover: $6
Tubes: Front $18, Back $28
Shop Labor: $100

I could have just paid the $143 at the shop to start with but I learned a few lessons in the process...

All in all it was an excellent learning experience. I gave in and took it to the shop for a few reasons. One, I didn't have the time to fart around with it any more. I'm getting ready to move to Texas and that's taking a lot of my time. Plus right now I split my time between PA and NYC so I'm not home that much to begin with. Another reason is that when I looked at all the stuff that had to come off when I took the back wheel off, I was worried I'd mess something up and I didn't have anyone to check my work after I was done to make sure it was right. If it wasn't right and I took it out for a ride (I ride mostly on the road) that could be disastrous for me.

I'd suggest that anyone give it a try. But for me, I'll stick with the shop doing it for me. I'll continue to change my own oil and small things like that, but the stuff that could kill me...I'll leave it to the pros.

I encourage you not to give up. Self-reliance is invaluable. Maybe take another run at it someday when you have a little extra time.
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Old 04-21-2012, 03:04 AM   #5352
Sateev
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Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klay View Post
I've got that beat. I do all my own tire changes for flat nothing.
Waves of guilt are washing over my psyche at this very moment - but wait! I USED to change all my own tires/tubes on motocrossers, dirt bikes, go carts, and even used railroad ties to break beads on my Landcruiser to patch the tubes out at Dumont Dunes in California! But now, I let people younger than me do the hard work (mostly).

Am I redeemed?

I do agree that being able to do it is valuable, and that Wallrat and Klay are right: learn to do it when you have time and it will pay dividends in the future...

Have fun.
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:24 AM   #5353
Highaltidude
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Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Oddometer: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorganSS View Post
is that the kientech package or can you link me to another jet
Stock jetting is 125 main and 35 pilot.

Just go into a motorcycle dealer (one that has Suzuki books would be preferred) and ask them for one size larger of each. (note an earlier post of mine regarding similar looking pilot jets) Should be 127.5 and 37.5. Easy to install.

The Kientech kit is really made for modified motors. It would work on your bike, but just jetting up is better bang for the buck.....

Chuck
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:34 AM   #5354
MorganSS
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Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Kerrville Texas
Oddometer: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highaltidude View Post
Stock jetting is 125 main and 35 pilot.

Just go into a motorcycle dealer (one that has Suzuki books would be preferred) and ask them for one size larger of each. (note an earlier post of mine regarding similar looking pilot jets) Should be 127.5 and 37.5. Easy to install.

The Kientech kit is really made for modified motors. It would work on your bike, but just jetting up is better bang for the buck.....

Chuck

Thanks Chuck, that sounds like what Im needing.

I was wondering a couple of things yesterday. I was a kart racer a few years ago, and Ive raced off road nitro buggies for years, we use temperature to help tune our engines and determine how lean/rich a mixture is combined with sound, performance, and all that. Are there any temperature specs for a 4 stroke out there? Right off the header I was pinging about 295 degrees about a nice 1.5 hour ride. Everything was fine with the bike but thats just really hot compared to the 220 degree zone us RC racers prefer.

Meh, probably nothing, but Ill be curious how the bigger jets cool it down a few degrees

Happy Trails!
Morgan
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Old 04-21-2012, 09:24 AM   #5355
Sateev
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Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highaltidude View Post
Stock jetting is 125 main and 35 pilot.

Just go into a motorcycle dealer (one that has Suzuki books would be preferred) and ask them for one size larger of each. (note an earlier post of mine regarding similar looking pilot jets) Should be 127.5 and 37.5. Easy to install.

The Kientech kit is really made for modified motors. It would work on your bike, but just jetting up is better bang for the buck.....

Chuck
Actually, the Kientech kit contains a different needle and an idle screw with a knob on the end, which is really good to have. And, for us flatlanders, the stock jets were 127.5, and 37.5. Jesse supplies, I believe, a 130 (main), and a 40 (pilot), in addition to the idle screw, and improved (and adjustable) needle.

As for modified motors, the improvement is noticeable with the stock motor, since even it is WAY lean. Opening up the muffler and either modifying or leaving off the airbox lid are not really motor modifications, and provide a lot of additional performance.

My bike has a Hotcams cam, FMF exhaust, and no airbox lid. Adjusting the needle position made it possible to dial it in so it runs well, and was worth he effort involved.

Just my $0.02
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