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Old 05-13-2012, 04:24 PM   #5521
Wallrat
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I like it. Those outwears do a surprisingly good job of shedding water.
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:03 PM   #5522
MorganSS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallrat View Post
Can get sheets of lexan or polycarbonate at Home Depot, Lowes, etc. for pretty cheap. Can cut it with a jigsaw using a fine blade. Doubt the piece you'd need would be more than $20-$30.

I accept your challenge!

I can bend form it with my heat gun. What about some sort of mounting rods that can hold on to the frame or the handlebars? any ideas?
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:27 PM   #5523
DCC!!
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hey guys i was wondering if any of you had a manual for a 86 sp 200?

if so i would like to know the gap for the magneto? i cant seem to find the spec anywhere.

Thanks
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Old 05-13-2012, 08:38 PM   #5524
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Originally Posted by MorganSS View Post
I accept your challenge!

I can bend form it with my heat gun. What about some sort of mounting rods that can hold on to the frame or the handlebars? any ideas?
No need for a heat gun. I've only seen it in 2 thicknesses and the thinner stuff should be fine for a windscreen and it bends easily. You'd want the rigidity to come from the brackets, not a thick piece of plastic. Plus direct heat tends to cloud transparent plastic.

As far as how to mount it...I suppose it depends on how cheap you want it to look. I tend to be a little OCD about my bike's appearance so my idea of custom involves a mill, lathe, and welder. Seen a few people that are happy to bungee cord a milk crate on their bikes so there's a pretty wide range of what you might consider quality.
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Old 05-13-2012, 09:30 PM   #5525
tony the tiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallrat View Post
No need for a heat gun. I've only seen it in 2 thicknesses and the thinner stuff should be fine for a windscreen and it bends easily. You'd want the rigidity to come from the brackets, not a thick piece of plastic. Plus direct heat tends to cloud transparent plastic.

As far as how to mount it...I suppose it depends on how cheap you want it to look. I tend to be a little OCD about my bike's appearance so my idea of custom involves a mill, lathe, and welder. Seen a few people that are happy to bungee cord a milk crate on their bikes so there's a pretty wide range of what you might consider quality.
Hey! I was scoping out somebody"s milk crate just today!
On other news, my rear sproket is starting to get a little worn... chain too skack, also (~2+ inches). I tried to tighten it up, but couldn't move the brake side farther than "4". I take it a rubber mallet should not be required for this task?
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Old 05-14-2012, 07:14 AM   #5526
SHO_GuN
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Originally Posted by tony the tiger View Post
Hey! I was scoping out somebody"s milk crate just today!
On other news, my rear sproket is starting to get a little worn... chain too skack, also (~2+ inches). I tried to tighten it up, but couldn't move the brake side farther than "4". I take it a rubber mallet should not be required for this task?
I don't use the 'snail' adjuster to move the wheel. I loosen the axle then hit the rear edge of the tire with my hand sideways. This moves the axle back on that side - set your snail, then repeat on the other side. Get the snails where you want them then give the wheel a good whack from the rear straight forward to tighten the axle up to the snails then torque the axle.
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Old 05-14-2012, 07:36 AM   #5527
tony the tiger
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Quote:
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I don't use the 'snail' adjuster to move the wheel. I loosen the axle then hit the rear edge of the tire with my hand sideways. This moves the axle back on that side - set your snail, then repeat on the other side. Get the snails where you want them then give the wheel a good whack from the rear straight forward to tighten the axle up to the snails then torque the axle.
Thank you!
Good to know I wasn't too far off the mark. When I install the new sprocket(s) I'll whack away in confidence.

I tried using the "snail" to move the right side back without success. Didn't want to force things too much, what I resorted to was a good thump on the end of the axle (in-line) to try and loosen it up a little on the right side - which allowed a slight adjustment, just not enough to take up the slack like I wanted. The left side (sprocket side) slid back as soon as I loosened the nut. I set them both as far as possible taking the right side limitation as my set point.

Anyways, it worked well enough to get me to work this morning though!
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Old 05-14-2012, 08:43 AM   #5528
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Makes it a lot easier if you support the rear wheel off the ground, although you can do it on the ground as well. Usually just easier to sit behind the bike and pull on the rear wheel in that case. Same deal though with the snails.

A loose chain doesn't necessarily mean its worn. Actually a new chain stretches so bad you often need to readjust it after the 1st ride. An extreme example of a worn sprocket is shown below. Basically when the teeth look like this \/ instead of this \_/ its time to think about changing them. Make sure you replace both sprockets and chain all at the same time or that new sprocket is gonna be worn in a few rides.

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Old 05-14-2012, 05:31 PM   #5529
lobsta
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s car go

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Old 05-15-2012, 06:26 PM   #5530
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Damn you Klay and Sateev

:-)

New seat on the bike......



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Old 05-17-2012, 08:54 AM   #5531
JayGoldstein
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Any hints for riding on gravel?

I was riding yesterday and decided to try an unpaved section of a provincial highway. I quickly discovered that the highway had recently been "improved," i.e, a layer of fresh gravel had been deposited and then graded. Because few cars and trucks had used the highway there were no tire tracks to ride in. Basically, it was like trying to ride on big marbles. Even though I kept my speed down to 50-60 km/h (30-35 mph) I had some of close calls. After a couple of kms I called it quits and turned around to find roads with better traction.

I don't have to ride on those kinds of roads, but if I should find myself in that situation, are there any special techniques for riding on loose gravel?
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:03 AM   #5532
Klay
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I don't have to ride on those kinds of roads, but if I should find myself in that situation, are there any special techniques for riding on loose gravel?
Stand up on the pegs and shift your body weight as far back as you can...while squeezing the tank or the front part of the seat with your knees. Let the bike move around and stay on the gas.
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Old 05-17-2012, 01:34 PM   #5533
Wallrat
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Stand up on the pegs and shift your body weight as far back as you can...while squeezing the tank or the front part of the seat with your knees. Let the bike move around and stay on the gas.

It seems counter-intuitive, but gravel, like sand, is actually easier to ride the faster you go. The wobble you get occurs when the front wheel starts to sink, blip the throttle and it will put it back on top again. The faster you go, the less the front wheel will tend to sink.

Klay's advice is key however. By shifting the center of gravity to your feet you'll do more than any other single thing you can do to make the bike more stable in less than ideal traction. Even leaving your butt on the seat and just shifting some of your weight to your feet will be a big improvement.

Other considerations are tires and air pressure. If you're running (mostly)street tires, then any trip offroad is going to be interesting. A smooth rear tire won't grip in loose stuff and blipping the throttle will just make it spin rather than pull the front end up. You can lower the pressure a bit in your tires to around 12-15 psi to get a larger contact area, but the benefit of doing this on slick tires is going to be negligible. With a proper knobby or more dirt oriented tire, pressure can have a huge effect on the bike's handling.
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Old 05-17-2012, 08:01 PM   #5534
poppawheelie
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Quote:
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Stand up on the pegs and shift your body weight as far back as you can...while squeezing the tank or the front part of the seat with your knees. Let the bike move around and stay on the gas.
Yup, that's good advice. Regarding the "let the bike move" part, I think of it as a dance. Don't try to force your line. Let the bike dance and lead it as you would a dance partner. Steer lightly. Force it or tighten up, and she will throw you down.
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Old 05-18-2012, 05:04 AM   #5535
psu75
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Dirt and gravel riding

Did a little of this myself this weekend with my girlfriend. Had a lot of fun until while riding up a steep incline the back tire got stuck and I just sat and spun. The trail was very narrow and the hill was steep. Couldn't go forward...couldn't go back. Couldn't turn around very easily as I'm not a very big person and can't bully the bike around too easily. The trail I was on wasn't going to make this an easy out for me.



Yep - bike fall down go boom (a few times) trying to get out of that mess. I run tires that are 80/20 street/dirt tires. They have about 200 miles on them so the tread is still very good. We did that same hill several times that same day, I just got bounced around and pushed to the side and stuck there when I down shifted and lost my momentum.

Other than that, we rode gravel and dirt roads that day and I agree with what you're all saying, it is like a dance. Don't try to power the bike into submission. Let it move you and just gently guide it along your way. Don't take sharp turns too fast or you'll eat it. And most of all...practice makes perfect! Go ride and enjoy!
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