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Old 05-03-2013, 06:10 AM   #15706
kobukan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
. . . Heresy I know... particular in this thread but if it were me, rather than trading for a later model but out of production e-start DR350, I'd go with a '96 or newer DR650. I have both. My 350 has a kickstart motor saving a few lbs but the e-start 350 is only a 25 or so lbs lighter than the 650 and is a couple of inches taller. The 650 is still a current production bike (lots of aftermarket goodies available) and is a much more relaxed ride except in the most rugged conditions. IMHO the 650 is a much more robust bike. Mine has 40K miles on it and has never required anything more than scheduled maintenance. My 350 on the other hand is on its 3rd motor in 35K miles (one main bearing failure, one excessive oil consumption). The only thing the 650 lacks is a 6th gear but it has so much torque it's really no big deal.
+1
This is why I've never gone to an e-start DR350 as much as I think I'd like one sometimes. At that point the weight difference is such that the value of having both DR350 & DR650 starts to become questionable for me. DR650's are so capable off road that it's sometimes hard to justify what I have now, but I didn't pay much for the 350 and I love having it so it's probably not going anywhere anytime soon. It does make riding the really rough stuff a little easier sometimes, and it's a little easier to pull out of deep mud when it gets buried.
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:43 AM   #15707
Greg Bender
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Location: Cave Creek, Arizona, United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kobukan View Post
+1
This is why I've never gone to an e-start DR350 as much as I think I'd like one sometimes. At that point the weight difference is such that the value of having both DR350 & DR650 starts to become questionable for me. DR650's are so capable off road that it's sometimes hard to justify what I have now, but I didn't pay much for the 350 and I love having it so it's probably not going anywhere anytime soon. It does make riding the really rough stuff a little easier sometimes, and it's a little easier to pull out of deep mud when it gets buried.
I treasure the simplicity of my kick-start DR350. No battery, no starter, no excess wiring. I love the lighter weight and the fewer things to go wrong. Knock on wood, mine is running like a champ. I have no idea how many miles were on it when I bought it (a lot, I'm guessing), but it has been 13,000+ miles since I put in new rings and had the valves ground.

I've owned a big "adventure" bike and ridden newer 650cc "dual sport" machines. Those machines certainly have their place, just not in my garage. The DR350 is very forgiving and durable. I do not want the extra power, the excess weight, the myriad of modern components that can go wrong, etc.

A dirt bike with a license plate, that is what I want :>

Regards,

Gregory Bender
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:53 AM   #15708
MarshkevUK
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Thanks for the feedback!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Bender View Post
I treasure the simplicity of my kick-start DR350. No battery, no starter, no excess wiring. I love the lighter weight and the fewer things to go wrong. Knock on wood, mine is running like a champ. I have no idea how many miles were on it when I bought it (a lot, I'm guessing), but it has been 13,000+ miles since I put in new rings and had the valves ground.

I've owned a big "adventure" bike and ridden newer 650cc "dual sport" machines. Those machines certainly have their place, just not in my garage. The DR350 is very forgiving and durable. I do not want the extra power, the excess weight, the myriad of modern components that can go wrong, etc.

A dirt bike with a license plate, that is what I want :>

Regards,

Gregory Bender
Thumper, Kobukan & Greg, thanks for your help & comments, with regards to the engine change I think that's what I needed to hear because it does somewhat reinforce the original reasons why I bought the DR...

My first dirt bike ever was a DR350E (the off-road version was road legal in the UK as are all the bikes listed below) and loved it until some scumbag stole it out of my lock up.
After that I had the usual collection of machines, DR 250 (Djebel version), Honda XR 250, Honda CRM 250 (the US missed a great bike there!) GASGAS 300, KTM 200, and then once I came to the States a KTM 450, which, unfortunately due to some health issues that took a while to get over the 450 went bye-bye.

So once I was given a clean bill of health I needed to get back into the woods and thought about the bikes I’d had and the pure simplicity of the DR coupled with the thought that I wanted to “get back to my roots” took me in that direction. Now a year on, I really enjoy the bike, I love the fact that I seem to be able to do things with it that others don’t seem to be able to do on more state of the art bikes (I would say more expensive machines but, boy have I put some money into the old girl!) and the mechanical simplicity means that i don't overly worry about things going wrong. However,kicking her over on a 1 in 3 slope, sideways with sweat dripping in my eyes gets to be a little old after a while, hence my thoughts of an electric boot…

Hopefully the pumper carb' I just fitted will help, and if not I’ll try harder to stop falling off! Who knows if it ever stops snowing in Northern Wisconsin maybe I’ll get to find out! Again, thanks for the comments.

Cheers,
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:06 AM   #15709
FireDog45
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Suspension advice

I had my suspension re-sprung as well as new fluids and nitrogen charge for the rear. I bought the Eibach springs from Jesse (.51 front and 8.1 rear IIRC) and had a bike mechanic buddy put everything together. He told me he left the compression and rebound settings in the middle.

I found during its maiden trail outing that the initial hit is a bit harsh. My thinking is I should soften the compression setting a little bit but what, if anything, should I do to the rebound?

This is my first bike with this kind of tuning ability and don't want to just start making changes until I have a better understanding of what the results should be.

Thanks for any advice!
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:29 AM   #15710
Greg Bender
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Location: Cave Creek, Arizona, United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireDog45 View Post
I had my suspension re-sprung as well as new fluids and nitrogen charge for the rear. I bought the Eibach springs from Jesse (.51 front and 8.1 rear IIRC) and had a bike mechanic buddy put everything together. He told me he left the compression and rebound settings in the middle.

I found during its maiden trail outing that the initial hit is a bit harsh. My thinking is I should soften the compression setting a little bit but what, if anything, should I do to the rebound?

This is my first bike with this kind of tuning ability and don't want to just start making changes until I have a better understanding of what the results should be.

Thanks for any advice!
Making changes to the suspension is generally a pain. There is no reasonable way to change shock preload on the trail. Changes to the damping and fork preload can be easier, but requires that you to stop and pull out a screw driver to make it happen. Then, hop back on and see if you can tell any difference. In short, it is time consuming.

As with carb adjustments, make one change at a time and see what it does. Like with carb adjustments, you will want to write down where you are at before messing with anything. See how many clicks each setting is at and write it down. Then, make one change, write it down, then test it out. Try to go over the same terrain at the same speed, etc. It takes time. Do not be afraid to go all the way to one end of the extreme and try it out. You may very well find that you need to do that just so you can feel with the change is. Then, you can go back and see what fine tuning you want to do.

Remember, the best thing to do is to start out by documenting where you are at. That way, you can always get back there afterward.

BTW, I never trust the carburetor settings on a used motorcycle. I generally find that someone has been in there and changed things around to suit them. I always start by returning the carburetor to the original specification, then I work from there. Typically I find that I need to make few, if any changes, to the original configuration.

Regards,

Gregory Bender
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:11 AM   #15711
slartidbartfast
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Location: Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyTim View Post
My engine is leaking oil. Has been so for approx four years. Runs fine. Hope it is the gaskets and nothing serious. Plan is to open it up, clean and replace.

Got the new gaskets, timing chain, guides, plug, cover o rings. Do I need anything else?

I don't have a manual. What are the valve clearances? Inches would be fine but metric would be much better.

It is a DR350 SE-X, street model with the magic button.

Thanks in advance.
Don't assume the oil is coming from the gaskets (although it may be). On mine, most of the leak that appeared to be coming from everywhere was actually from the rubber-covered washers that seal the bolts holding the cam cover on. The washers were hard and someone had stripped one of the bolts. Hot oil was running down the engine and even after several attempts to find/fix the leak, it was not immediately obvious where it originated from.
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January 2010 New Zealand South Island ride
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:30 AM   #15712
plugeye
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Bender View Post
I treasure the simplicity of my kick-start DR350. No battery, no starter, no excess wiring. I love the lighter weight and the fewer things to go wrong. Kn

A dirt bike with a license plate, that is what I want :>

Regards,

Gregory Bender
Amen brother
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:48 PM   #15713
markk900
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireDog45 View Post
I had my suspension re-sprung as well as new fluids and nitrogen charge for the rear. I bought the Eibach springs from Jesse (.51 front and 8.1 rear IIRC) and had a bike mechanic buddy put everything together. He told me he left the compression and rebound settings in the middle.

I found during its maiden trail outing that the initial hit is a bit harsh. My thinking is I should soften the compression setting a little bit but what, if anything, should I do to the rebound?

This is my first bike with this kind of tuning ability and don't want to just start making changes until I have a better understanding of what the results should be.

Thanks for any advice!
On top of what Greg said, specifically for the front if you hit a series of whoops or dips and you are finding the front pogoing, you need to back off on the rebound. Same if you pop the wheel up and you hear the front top out. If you find the front packing down then add some rebound. This is over a section of repetitive bumps of all about the same intensity.

Also, do a web search on suspension settings - there's a lot of good advice out there - you just need to triangulate in on the common stuff and ignore the weird stuff.
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:56 PM   #15714
thump!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
On top of what Greg said, specifically for the front if you hit a series of whoops or dips and you are finding the front pogoing, you need to back off on the rebound. Same if you pop the wheel up and you hear the front top out. If you find the front packing down then add some rebound. This is over a section of repetitive bumps of all about the same intensity.
Maybe its just terminology but that seems exactly opposite. My understanding of rebound damping is that it slows the the extension of the forks. Using your topping out example wouldn't you want more damping to slow the rate of extension?
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:19 PM   #15715
slartidbartfast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
Maybe its just terminology but that seems exactly opposite. My understanding of rebound damping is that it slows the the extension of the forks. Using your topping out example wouldn't you want more damping to slow the rate of extension?
Yes, it's terminology and mark900 has it wrong. He said "back off the rebound" and what you took it to mean was "back off the rebound damping". What he should have said was "add rebound damping" but if he'd said "add rebound" you and everyone else (except mark900) would have known what was meant.
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MSF Ridercoach IBA: 35353 95 R1100GSA, 93 GTS1000, 85 R80RT, 93 DR350/435, 99 RX125, 78 DT100
January 2010 New Zealand South Island ride
Summer 2009 UK to Alps ride
Summer 2008 UK End-to-End ride
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Old 05-03-2013, 04:02 PM   #15716
FireDog45
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Location: Central, Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
On top of what Greg said, specifically for the front if you hit a series of whoops or dips and you are finding the front pogoing, you need to back off on the rebound. Same if you pop the wheel up and you hear the front top out. If you find the front packing down then add some rebound. This is over a section of repetitive bumps of all about the same intensity.

Also, do a web search on suspension settings - there's a lot of good advice out there - you just need to triangulate in on the common stuff and ignore the weird stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Bender View Post
Making changes to the suspension is generally a pain. There is no reasonable way to change shock preload on the trail. Changes to the damping and fork preload can be easier, but requires that you to stop and pull out a screw driver to make it happen. Then, hop back on and see if you can tell any difference. In short, it is time consuming.

As with carb adjustments, make one change at a time and see what it does. Like with carb adjustments, you will want to write down where you are at before messing with anything. See how many clicks each setting is at and write it down. Then, make one change, write it down, then test it out. Try to go over the same terrain at the same speed, etc. It takes time. Do not be afraid to go all the way to one end of the extreme and try it out. You may very well find that you need to do that just so you can feel with the change is. Then, you can go back and see what fine tuning you want to do.

Remember, the best thing to do is to start out by documenting where you are at. That way, you can always get back there afterward.

BTW, I never trust the carburetor settings on a used motorcycle. I generally find that someone has been in there and changed things around to suit them. I always start by returning the carburetor to the original specification, then I work from there. Typically I find that I need to make few, if any changes, to the original configuration.

Regards,

Gregory Bender
Thanks guys! I'm pretty confident my preload is spot on as I set everything per Jesse's instructions. I was concerned that the rear spring rate was way too stiff but after getting it mounted it was spot on!

There isn't any pogo effect that I can tell its just when the front hits more of a square edge bump the initial deflection "feels" harsh to me.

I may not have stated my question correctly so I'll try again: should the rebound and compression be adjusted together or are they independent of each other, meaning if I soften one should there be a corresponding adjustment to the other?

(I also haven't researched this anywhere else yet but wanted to post it here first in case there are any peculiarities to the DR)

Thanks again!
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Old 05-03-2013, 04:16 PM   #15717
markk900
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Sorry guys - right concept, wrong explanation on my part....my intent was to say for example if topping happens increase the amount of resistance on rebound (to slow response), and for packing down decrease the resistance (so that the forks can respond quicker)....I'll blame it on a lack of ability to speak in plain language!

"Turn left....no, the other left"....

and at the risk of further embarrassment, to the restated question the compression and rebound are related but changing one does not necessarily mean changing the other....
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:47 PM   #15718
FireDog45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
Sorry guys - right concept, wrong explanation on my part....my intent was to say for example if topping happens increase the amount of resistance on rebound (to slow response), and for packing down decrease the resistance (so that the forks can respond quicker)....I'll blame it on a lack of ability to speak in plain language!

"Turn left....no, the other left"....

and at the risk of further embarrassment, to the restated question the compression and rebound are related but changing one does not necessarily mean changing the other....
My instinct was that they were adjusted separately but wanted some clarification. I'll soften the compression first and see how it responds.

Thanks!
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:11 AM   #15719
TinyTim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Bender View Post
Here is a manual for you, enjoy!

http://thisoldtractor.com/gtbender/d...ervice_manuals

As for other things, I'd think seals would be a good to replacing if you are opening it up.
Honestly, though, I would figure out the location of the leak before diving in and replacing bits.
Regards,
Gregory Bender
Quote:
Don't assume the oil is coming from the gaskets (although it may be). On mine, most of the leak that appeared to be coming from everywhere was actually from the rubber-covered washers that seal the bolts holding the cam cover on. The washers were hard and someone had stripped one of the bolts. Hot oil was running down the engine and even after several attempts to find/fix the leak, it was not immediately obvious where it originated from.
slartidbartfast
Manual downloaded. Thank you Mr Bender.
Gentlemen, very good advice indeed. No need to open it up. No need for gaskets or timing chain. At least not for now.

We cleaned the engine, applied lots of white flour and started her up. Of course there was lots of smoke and the acrid smell of burning flour. The obvious culprit was the Plug(aka 'camshaft end cap'). So we took the top off and replaced the it. The inside looks OK, so we adjusted the valve clearance according to the manual - In 0.08mm Out 0.10mm. Applied a thin layer of liquid gasket, changed the O rings on the valve covers and put it back together. It ran fine. No visible leak or smoke. I'll run it for a few days to see if there are other leaks. Many thanks.
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TinyTim screwed with this post 05-04-2013 at 06:19 AM
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:26 AM   #15720
jmderyke
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rim lock

Does anyone know off hand the width of the rear rim lock? Im wanting to replace mine with motionpro liteloc but they have three different sizes 1.40 1.85 and 2.15". I think I need the 1.85" Just a shot in the dark trying to save some time from doing it twice thanks
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