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Old Yesterday, 08:08 AM   #1
brooklyn slim OP
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fireplace chimney gurus, help!

Planning to install a wood-burning fireplace in time for next winter. Idea is to install unit in an insulated doghouse attached to house with insulated SS chimney pipe for a chimney running up side of house to above ridgeline of roof. House is three stories high.

Store owner says this will not do, SS insulated pipe exposed to weather will get too cold to allow proper draft. He says I would have to run the chimney inside the house or box it in and insulate its entire run if outside for fireplace to draft properly.

Is he right?

If so, an alternative would be to install unit in insulated doghouse as above, 45 the chimney into the house then 45 it again to run straight up through three floors and out the roof (pipe will go through closets which fortunately line up above the spot where the fireplace will sit). I'm sure a straight run would be ideal, but is this idea doable?

Fireplace unit has to sit outside house since living room is pretty narrow and I don't want unit to intrude on living space.

Hope this is clear. Thanks in advance for any advice.
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Old Yesterday, 08:11 AM   #2
MitchG
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Store guy is correct. Have a certified installer do a site inspection and give you his recommendation.....Money well spent.
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Old Yesterday, 08:12 AM   #3
brooklyn slim OP
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Store guy is correct.
I was afraid of that, but thanks.

What about the second question?
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Old Yesterday, 08:17 AM   #4
rapidoxidationman
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Boxing in the pipe on the outside of the house was the first solution I thought of. I wouldn't want stove pipe running through closet space, nor would I want unnecessary bends in the pipe (makes it a bitch to clean).

Of course, you could just put in a gas fired stove and be done with it...
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Old Yesterday, 08:44 AM   #5
Tmaximusv
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Any turns in the pipe will not only make cleaning difficult, but will result in significant flow restriction. Not a linear relationship in flow reduction.
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Old Yesterday, 08:53 AM   #6
small_e_900
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Did you consider a pellet stove?

Flue requirements are not the same as they use forced combustion/exhaust. with outside air.

There are window, door and overhang clearence requirements but they don't have to extend beyond the ridge.
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Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM   #7
Maggot12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapidoxidationman View Post
Boxing in the pipe on the outside of the house was the first solution I thought of. I wouldn't want stove pipe running through closet space, nor would I want unnecessary bends in the pipe (makes it a bitch to clean).

Of course, you could just put in a gas fired stove and be done with it...
^^^ I would go with this as well. And since you're "dog housing" the stove keep the dog house going up to the roof.
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Old Yesterday, 09:05 AM   #8
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Like this...

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Old Yesterday, 09:11 AM   #9
A-Bone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tmaximusv View Post
Any turns in the pipe will not only make cleaning difficult, but will result in significant flow restriction. Not a linear relationship in flow reduction.
The NFPA 211 will speak to the breaching code allowances for changes in direction.. What you described is probably legal, but you have to account for pipe sizing, lengths of runs, number of changes in direction and what types of changes in direction.

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standa...=code&code=211

This is where having a licensed (and insured) installer pays for itself.. If you have insurance on your home, the insurance company may require proof of a permit being pulled and proof of final inspection, which you are not going to get unless it meets code..

An alternative that I am not too crazy about, but that is code-legal, are direct-vent pellet stoves..

You can get away with something like this:



But depending on the stove, air-flow and pellets used you can end up with a sooty stain on your house..

This is an extreme example of how it can go...but gives you an idea of what can happen..

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Old Yesterday, 09:14 AM   #10
brooklyn slim OP
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Like this...

Looks great, I'd love to do that, but the house is a 90 yr old Queen Anne Victorian with decorative shingles in complex patterns and which "belly out" at the third floor level. And the molding under the roof line is a good 15" wide with complex milling.

So I either I cut through all that stuff (not an option - wife would kill me and then I'd kill myself) or I build a three story enclosure and spend my life savings tying it into the house, mill new moldings, etc.
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Old Yesterday, 09:16 AM   #11
A-Bone
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Do you have natural gas available at your house??

What you are describing is going to be so expensive that you'd have to live there and burn a lot of wood to make up for the fuel savings over what ever you are currently using...

Plus you are talking about a fireplace, which is really more about ambiance than heating, so that makes the return on investment a dubious proposition..

But if you just want a fire place and money is no object, there is no reason that a contractor couldn't get-r-done..
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Old Yesterday, 09:19 AM   #12
brooklyn slim OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Bone View Post
The NFPA 211 will speak to the breaching code allowances for changes in direction.. What you described is probably legal, but you have to account for pipe sizing, lengths of runs, number of changes in direction and what types of changes in direction.

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standa...=code&code=211

This is where having a licensed (and insured) installer pays for itself.. If you have insurance on your home, the insurance company may require proof of a permit being pulled and proof of final inspection, which you are not going to get unless it meets code..

An alternative that I am not too crazy about, but that is code-legal, are direct-vent pellet stoves..

You can get away with something like this:



But depending on the stove, air-flow and pellets used you can end up with a sooty stain on your house..

This is an extreme example of how it can go...but gives you an idea of what can happen..

Wow. That's more detail than I expected, thanks for your time.

Part of the reason we want to do this is to have an actual firewood fire to enjoy, so pellets and gas are off the table, sadly (the expense of installing and running a gas fireplace makes it an attractive option, but the look's not what we want)
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Old Yesterday, 09:21 AM   #13
brooklyn slim OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Bone View Post
Do you have natural gas available at your house??

What you are describing is going to be so expensive that you'd have to live there and burn a lot of wood to make up for the fuel savings over what ever you are currently using...

Plus you are talking about a fireplace, which is really more about ambiance than heating, so that makes the return on investment a dubious proposition..

But if you just want a fire place and money is no object, there is no reason that a contractor couldn't get-r-done..
Bingo, ambience is the goal, not heat.

The only relevant return on investment is happy wifey, which beats money.
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Old Yesterday, 09:24 AM   #14
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I have a pellet stove in a house in NS. Their law, if i remember correctly, the pipe requires a minimum 4ft verticle rise as in your diagram, but i put the pipe on the inside for asthetic reasons.

Form the pic of the sooted siding, looks like the pipe may be coming straight out the exhaust with no rise.



Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Bone View Post
The NFPA 211 will speak to the breaching code allowances for changes in direction.. What you described is probably legal, but you have to account for pipe sizing, lengths of runs, number of changes in direction and what types of changes in direction.

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standa...=code&code=211

This is where having a licensed (and insured) installer pays for itself.. If you have insurance on your home, the insurance company may require proof of a permit being pulled and proof of final inspection, which you are not going to get unless it meets code..

An alternative that I am not too crazy about, but that is code-legal, are direct-vent pellet stoves..

You can get away with something like this:



But depending on the stove, air-flow and pellets used you can end up with a sooty stain on your house..

This is an extreme example of how it can go...but gives you an idea of what can happen..

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Old Yesterday, 09:31 AM   #15
troidus
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If ambiance is what you want, maybe frame in a big flat-screen TV and run the Yule Log video they play at Christmas. Otherwise it's just going to make your house cold.
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