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Old 03-08-2014, 11:53 AM   #1
Willadams1 OP
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Changing tyres at home!

Hi!
I have a WR250R which I want to change the tyres on to something more road orientated!
I have ordered a pair of heideneu k60's. Should I attempt to change them myself? I have watched YouTube vids on people changing motocross tyres, but these heidenau's seem to have fairly stiff walls which might make it quite difficult!
How difficult will it be? Should I just take them to a garage?!
Many thanks,
Will
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:32 PM   #2
backroadbob.com
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Changing Tires

If you're not a skilled mechanic, don't have a changer, or specialized tools take them to a dealer. It's no fun paying as much for the change as the tire, but it beats busted knuckles.
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:33 PM   #3
pelvis_98
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Try it yourself.

Just make sure when you are putting them on, that the tire on the opposite side you are working on stays in the centre of the rim and does not seat.

Leave them in the sun to warm up and use plenty of lube, If you are having a hard time getting them on, walk away take a break and come back to it.
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:50 PM   #4
Willadams1 OP
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I fix aircraft for a living so i don't think i lack the hand skills! Its just sometimes things like this can be the most trying!
Does anyone know of a good newbie guide? Need to get myself a set of tyre levers for now!
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:56 PM   #5
darren70
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Do it at home mate. Jump around the tyre to pop the bead then put it sprocket down, valve opposite, you kneel on the tyre closes to you to put the bead in the centre of the rim then start at the opposite side to you and work your way around in small bites. Put the new ones on with baby powder inside and hand soap or similar on the bead. About 10 min a wheel is a lazy time and its good practice for when your out.
Hope that helps
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Old 03-08-2014, 01:15 PM   #6
Wasser
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A YouTube video is nice but, it can't compare to hands on training.

Head upstairs to regionals and find some riders in your area. See if someone is holding a tech day or, if someone is going to change their own tires and ask if you could you come over to watch and learn. Maybe get some hands on.
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Old 03-08-2014, 03:29 PM   #7
victor441
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There have been a bunch of good threads here and I'm able to mount all my own MC tires (tube and tubeless) fairly easily now thanks to what I learned...some things I picked up from them are-

get some REAL tire lube, Ruglyde from Napa is good and works much better than dishwashing soap, etc IME
if possible make (or buy) some sort of workstand to hold the wheel, the job is way easier with the wheel secured and at waist level (also a bead breaker if you eventually tackle tubeless tires)
try using heavy duty zip ties, tire mounting is MUCH easier and it is nearly impossible to pinch a tube that way (the tube is inflated just enough to round it out and put in the tire before the zip ties are used to force the beads together)
clean the mounting lube from the tire thoroughly after mounting to avoid a crash and take it easy until the tires are scuffed in a bit, new tires can sometimes be very slippery




victor441 screwed with this post 03-08-2014 at 03:36 PM
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:15 PM   #8
ausfahrt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pelvis_98 View Post
Try it yourself.

Just make sure when you are putting them on, that the tire on the opposite side you are working on stays in the centre of the rim and does not seat.

Leave them in the sun to warm up and use plenty of lube, If you are having a hard time getting them on, walk away take a break and come back to it.
+1

All you lack is a bead breaker and these...

https://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle...o_tire_spoons/

Good luck.
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:24 PM   #9
_cy_
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willadams1 View Post
Hi!
I have a WR250R which I want to change the tyres on to something more road orientated!
I have ordered a pair of heideneu k60's. Should I attempt to change them myself? I have watched YouTube vids on people changing motocross tyres, but these heidenau's seem to have fairly stiff walls which might make it quite difficult!
How difficult will it be? Should I just take them to a garage?!
Many thanks,
Will
if you can't change out a tire at home .. how are you going to fix a flat tire on the trail?

use this as an excuse to learn how to change out your own tires.
lots of how to change out tire threads on adv .. most important too to have is ... tire lube .. use real tire lube.

stay away from spoons your first outing .. to avoid pinch flats .. slightly inflate tube. most importantly know where tip of tire iron is at all times. never pry lever over rim any more than absolutely necessary.

soon as tire tool pushes bead goes over edge of rim .. STOP.. going further increases chance of pinch flat
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:43 PM   #10
PineyMountainRacing
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I need an A&P/IA, I'll change your tires and you keep my airplane legal? Deal?

Seriously, I actually enjoy changing tires now. Lots of different ways to do it without damaging your rims and pinching tubes, or tearing tubeless tires. If you're sweating and swearing you're likely doing it wrong. It takes finesse and technique, not brute strength. I'm always happy to help peeps when they start. I'm in SW Florida, come on by if you're in the 'hood.
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Old 03-08-2014, 06:16 PM   #11
trc.rhubarb
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Just changed tires to the K60 today.
I've heard what a bear they are to install.
I have to say they were the easiest I've ever installed and went on quickly with minimal balancing required.

I use a harbor freight bead breaker (the big yellow one), Motion Pro tire irons, RUGlyde and an air compressor ( a real one, not a 12v) and all in it took about 45m including balancing and cleanup.
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Old 03-08-2014, 07:21 PM   #12
huron52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victor441 View Post
There have been a bunch of good threads here and I'm able to mount all my own MC tires (tube and tubeless) fairly easily now thanks to what I learned...some things I picked up from them are-

get some REAL tire lube, Ruglyde from Napa is good and works much better than dishwashing soap, etc IME
if possible make (or buy) some sort of workstand to hold the wheel, the job is way easier with the wheel secured and at waist level (also a bead breaker if you eventually tackle tubeless tires)
try using heavy duty zip ties, tire mounting is MUCH easier and it is nearly impossible to pinch a tube that way (the tube is inflated just enough to round it out and put in the tire before the zip ties are used to force the beads together)
clean the mounting lube from the tire thoroughly after mounting to avoid a crash and take it easy until the tires are scuffed in a bit, new tires can sometimes be very slippery



Great idea with the tie wraps....
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Old 03-09-2014, 06:51 AM   #13
Stan_R80/7
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I recommend getting a bicycle (as in a two wheel pedal type) wheel and remove and replace the tire (tyre). The principles are identical to removing/replacing a motorcycle tyre (or car tire for that matter) but the forces are much less. Once you can remove and replace the bicycle tire by hand without using irons, then you have the correct technique.

Alternately, reason through the process and understand that the tire rim is too large to fit over the wheel rim. This can be readily checked by measuring them. How is the paradox solved? By moving the tire rim out of plane and into a recess built into the wheel center. Only by taking advantage of this feature can the tire be mounted on the wheel.

Some lubricant is still needed for a motorcycle tire along with (short) tire irons and rim protectors. Removing and replacing tires is all about technique, much like tying a knot, and understanding the principles (i.e. theory) will prevent damaging the wheel or installer. Getting the tire warm is also helpful, using lubricant is generally needed, and finding a way to keep the tire rim in the wheel recess is required.

As mentioned initially, changing a bicycle tire by hand without irons applies and reinforces the required technique. Perhaps its a bad analogy, but I associated changing a tire with tying a knot - in that sometimes it helps to refresh and practice the technique. Good luck!
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Old 03-09-2014, 07:18 AM   #14
_cy_
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it's well worth spending a few minutes watching this video from No Mar .. please ignore the advertizement factor .. techniques he shows apply to changing all tires .. this includes changing tires using tire levers.

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Old 03-09-2014, 09:24 AM   #15
Nailhead
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Best Rest offers a tire lube that is phenomenal-- better than Ruglyde IMHO.

Be careful with the optimism engendered by following Stan's suggestion: I have changed countless mountain & road bicycle tires, and I have had more success at finding Higg's Bosons than I have changing moto tires. I am simply atrocious at it, and really disappointed all my previous experience has amounted to so little.

Good luck all the same.
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