ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-27-2008, 10:25 PM   #181
Inane Cathode
Cheated Anion
 
Inane Cathode's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Arvada, CO
Oddometer: 4,601
Absolutely dead battery? Theres a chance you could save it, it only takes time and a couple bucks!

Make sure you're in a well ventilated area or outside on a breezy day. We're playing with various explosive gasses so its best they be dispersed :)

Get a big bucket, fill it halfway with hot water. Get a whole box of baking soda (family size, about 6 by 8 by 2) and dump the entire box in the water. Get a big stick and stir it around until its totally dissolved.

Pop the cell caps off the battery and set them aside. Using your big dishwashing gloves grab the battery and overturn it over the bucket, shake it up and down back and forth to get all the electrolye out and into the bucket. It'll either fizz or do nothing when the electrolyte hits the water.

Set the battery aside and stir the bucket around making sure to get the water up the sides of the inside of the bucket (gets all the acid off the walls of the bucket)

Now fill each cell of the battery up to the top fill line with distilled water. Make sure not to transfer any of the battery juices into the container of distilled water (via turkey baster/syringe). Its also important to note that you DO NOT want to contaminate the battery with the baking soda water, or the baking soda water with the distilled water in the container.

Leave the caps off the battery and hook the battery up to the strongest charger you can find. I use 'start' mode on my ancient roll around charger. It says it puts out 40 amps (somehow i doubt that). Make sure you hook the battery up first and then turn on the charger (trying to avoid sparks here)

I normally charge it at the highest, max smoke setting, for 20 minutes or so. Dont just time it, feel the battery on all sides with your hand (you did wipe the battery off didnt you). It will probably get warm, but when it gets hot (easily touchably hot but definitely towards the warm end of things) its time to stop. The battery will bubble during this process. Vapor will also come out of the cell ports. Nothing to worry about, just try not to concentrate it and breath it in (put your gold colored paper bags away!). The vapor is water vapor, hydrogen, oxygen, and sulpher dioxide (not 100 percent sure on the SiO2, but it is sulpher based).

Turn off the battery charger and unhook the battery. Overturn the battery over the baking soda bucket again, shaking it to get all the fluid out of the battery.

What most likely will happen at this point is the top part of the electrolyte will be inert, meaning no fizzing when it hits the water, but the bottom part of the electrolyte (thinking of the battery cell like a column of water here) will be quite energetic. Whats also likely is none of the fluid you dump out will be energetic, which means the battery is extremely sulphated, which just means things might take longer.

Repeat the above steps about five or six times. At this point the fluid coming out of the battery will at some point stop being so energetic. (Be warned this might end up taking ten times or so). This means that the sulphate is mostly gone and hopefully whats left is fresh plates, ie fresh battery.

Battery electrolyte is apparently hazmat now, so you'll have to take your battery to a battery store and have them fill it. I get mine filled for two bucks. (tell them you dropped your battery and it emptied itself or something, if you tell them what you're doing they'll probably laugh at you).

Put your battery on a slow charge (i do mine at 1 or 2 amps) for two or three hours. This will get the last of the sulphate freed up and also make sure things are operational. Check your battery voltage after this charge. It should be somewhere between 12 and 12.8 volts, possibly 13 if you charged it at a higher rate.

Put your cell caps back on, wipe off the exterior with the baking soda solution (dont get the solution in the battery!) and enjoy your fixed battery :)



[Caveats]
This wont work on ancient batteries. The plates themselves in the battery are physically destroyed. No amount of charging will put them back together again. Two years is right on the fuzzy line of being too old to try this on. Its cheap enough to try it on anything, but you might be wasting time with that 1985 vintage duracell. This process should work on shorted batteries as well, if the shorting is due to a sediment build up. Of course that sedimate is likely lead, which means your plates are destroyed which means you're wasting your time again.
Its obviously always cheaper time wise to buy a new battery, but rescuing an old one is recycling and better for the environment and better for your wallet. This method is for people with more time than money essentially.
__________________
_______
Pokey The Wunderbus
The VEEP Project



Inane Cathode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 06:24 AM   #182
LadyDraco
KillerSmileIHazIt !!
 
LadyDraco's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: FeederOfMorans~Some of the best roads in the east.
Oddometer: 27,163
The used fabric sheets... Just use your favorite cleaner like Plexus ..Or whipe n shine.. All your doing is changing the rag ... Not the cleaner..
The sheets are a micro fiber... And but woven in a way the just lifts the bugs right off... Been using it for years... You will need your soft rag to buff the shield.. Also works on the bike and your helmet...
LadyDraco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 01:35 PM   #183
Squeaky
A Few Loose Screws...
 
Squeaky's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Oddometer: 1,610
Another one for bugs -

Here on the gulf coast we have "love bugs" that swarm for a week or two each Spring and Fall. When you are out riding, there's simply no way to avoid them and as they dry, they small bad and wear away at your paint.

When you get to your lunch stop or destination, wet a napkin or paper towel with water and drape it over the helmet. The moisture will help break them up, and by the time you're done eating they'll be soft and loose enough you can use the paper towel to wipe them off.
__________________
Rebecca
Houston, TX
'03 VStrom 1k "Wilbur"
'98 XR400R "Templeton"

Squeaky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 01:42 PM   #184
Rad
Just me
 
Rad's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2001
Location: Santa Cruz, Calif
Oddometer: 12,160
The zip loc bag and sharpie pen for keeping track of fasteners has been mentioned a few times. I do those with two elements that really work for me. Most of the time I find it possible to just thread the fastener back in place in the part after removal or on the part left behind. This way, I never have to guess where the fastener is or which one goes where.

My other indispensable trick when doing a complicated job for the first times, along with taking notes, is I take a digital pic every step of the way and I just keep the camera in the garage and scroll back to see a pic to check even simple things like where or how a cable or wire needs to be routed for reassembly.

Sometimes I save the entire photo set in a new file in my Smugmug account and I can post a quick pic when someone has a question about a maintenance procedure.




Like here on my KTM, I don't have to guess how the gears line up, I just look at the pic.
Rad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 03:05 PM   #185
the_gr8t_waldo
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: tacoma warshington
Oddometer: 2,051
i always have a roll of T.P. hangging from the garage ceiling. the bitter end is always hangind down from that. when ever i need a section or three i just reach up tear off what i need and then clean up whatever it is that made me reach up. the size is nice and small so you usually don't use more than you really need ( unlike shop towels) always clean so i don't worry about dirt from the floor geting to something like bearings.
the_gr8t_waldo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 05:29 PM   #186
marchyman
Cam Killer
 
marchyman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: SF Bay Area
Oddometer: 6,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rad
My other indispensable trick when doing a complicated job for the first times, along with taking notes, is I take a digital pic every step of the way and I just keep the camera in the garage and scroll back to see a pic to check even simple things like where or how a cable or wire needs to be routed for reassembly.
You can not take too many pictures. Never. Take a 100 pictures of something before you take it apart and when it comes time to put it back together you will find that none of them cover some aspect of reassembly which has you guessing. Should have taken 200. Or 300. After all, it's only bits on disk.
marchyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2008, 06:31 PM   #187
Inane Cathode
Cheated Anion
 
Inane Cathode's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Arvada, CO
Oddometer: 4,601
When you're detailing a car or bike, make sure you have your handy tub of playdoh handy!
Get the surface you want to thoroughly clean wet and generally clean (get the dirt off it, dont bother scrubbing, just get the gritty stuff off).
Now, with the surface sufficiently wet (a layer of standing water on it basically) fold up a piece of playdoh into a cube or block, get the playdoh wet as well.
Take your block of playdoh, flat side down, and glide it over the surface of the finish. Its hard to describe the amount of pressure you need, but suffice to say almost NO pressure. Let the playdoh glide over the surface. You might have to fold it back over on itself and reshape it every once in a while, but you'll know when. Give the finish a final rinse with filtered/distilled water (doesnt leave mineral spots). Now you can enjoy your immaculate finish
The trick is the playdoh is 'sticky' enough as it slides on the surface (10s of thousandths of an inch over actually) any debris thats stuck on the car, bits of fuzz, minute bits of pinesap, stuck on dirt and so forth gets lodged in the playdoh, and because of the layer of water the playdoh doesnt ever actually touch the finish (if it does its soft enough it wont damage the surfaec) so whatever grit and debris the dough catches buries into the playdoh and wont scratch/gouge the finish.
__________________
_______
Pokey The Wunderbus
The VEEP Project



Inane Cathode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2008, 04:16 PM   #188
the_gr8t_waldo
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: tacoma warshington
Oddometer: 2,051
there's one design feature that was worked out very well for me. i'm an electrican, so i take these things lightly, but when installing recepticals in your work shop. don't over look the ceiling. my garage ceiling is too high for this , except for where theres a beam that runs across the width of the garage. it's there that i installed two duplex recpts. in two locations ( that's a total of 8 available plug recpts!).. it is so easy to use recpts this way
you plug in a charger and it just dangles directly down to my one bike. no cords to trip over! when roaming around the shop. and when i need to plug in a tool, i don't even have to bend over. and it's always in the center of the action.
the_gr8t_waldo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 08:17 AM   #189
BucketHead
Would-Be Camel Man
 
BucketHead's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: 85% salt water
Oddometer: 224
White Out is a cheap, easy way to make timing marks or index marks more visible. Great for indexing parts during disassembly as well.
BucketHead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2008, 05:54 PM   #190
RobbieO
Muskokatard
 
RobbieO's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Dumpmere - Muskoka
Oddometer: 7,518
I never throw away an old toothbrush.
They work great for cleaning bolt threads and other small parts.

Oh, it also helps if you have a parts washer......

__________________
I'm adorable........and I smell nice!
RobbieO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 07:22 AM   #191
Sir Real Ed
n00b
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lynchburg, VA
Oddometer: 3
retrieve FCR O-Rings & washer

TTer's,

I found this out by well, er you know. If the o-ring and/0r washer do not come out when you remove your FCR fuel screw, insert a 2.5mm hex ball diver gently into the fuel screw hole.

The ball will spread the o-ring as it goes thru and capture the o-ring and the washer to pull both out.

"Necessity may be the mother of invention, but desperation is the whore of innovation!"
Sir Real Ed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 10:56 PM   #192
heykenny
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: western washington
Oddometer: 414
1)carb cleaning hell?.. S100 ,the cycle cleaner, available in 1 gallon size.. strong enough to clean nasty gummed up carb,but gentle enough not to eat the glued passage plugs out... 2) root canal files.. tiny 1 in pointy pokers with their own built in handle.. great for passages you need to clean without reaming the hole out to the wrong size
heykenny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 09:11 AM   #193
motoxer667
Studly Adventurer
 
motoxer667's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Lebanon, Ohio
Oddometer: 508
I use old computer speakers and a portable XM radio in the garage. The antenna sits right next to it and has no problem with a signal even with the garage door closed.

__________________
Which way did they go? They are suppose to be following me, I am their leader.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=720349
motoxer667 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 02:43 PM   #194
Sir Real Ed
n00b
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lynchburg, VA
Oddometer: 3
fuel line for spark plug removal & installation

slight mod on the already listed tip of using fuel line to grip and rotate spark plugs in recessed locations.

I have several different lengths in my tool box, each with a wooden dowel inside to keep the line straight.

Example:
5" long 3/8" diameter dowel inside a piece of 6" long 3/8" ID fuel line
4" long 1/4" diameter dowel inside a piece of 5" long 1/4" ID fuel line
etc, etc, etc.

different lengths and diameters for different jobs!!!!
Sir Real Ed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 04:57 PM   #195
gdavis2265
Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2007
Oddometer: 15
How about using the Play-Doh and building a dam around a fasterner- then squirting penetrating oil to let it sit over night.
gdavis2265 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014