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Old 04-06-2008, 08:50 PM   #211
gcb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guano11

This may seem so obvious, but it was a revelation to me (and I thought of it myself): As I strip the bike of tanks, plastic, fairings, etc, I will keep the fasteners in the appropriately labeled bins of a fishing tackle box.
Always did that. But after taking apart my car's dashboard, which has NO two screw alike, i developed a new way.

1. take part out
2. as soon as you can, put ALL the screws in their places again.

This way you have a minor extra removal step before putting toghether... but it pays off.

Now i'm taking apart a bike one year younger then me. most the the fasteners are not the original ones anymore, so will surely stick to this method again.
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Old 04-06-2008, 09:38 PM   #212
Squeaky
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Helped take apart an ST1300, which is notorious for having too many fastners to keep track of - so we did the cardboard method. We had plenty of hands on the bike, so I became the "label girl".

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Old 04-07-2008, 09:05 AM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeaky
Helped take apart an ST1300, which is notorious for having too many fastners to keep track of - so we did the cardboard method. We had plenty of hands on the bike, so I became the "label girl".
I have a roll of butcher paper for that purpose also. I draw the assembly and put the fastener on the spot it belongs to. Then clean them one at a time and put the back on the spot until re-assembly time. Too feeble-minded to try to remember where they all go!! Digital photos and witness marks also help "brain fade" issues. I also put the new parts next to the old parts before reassembly in case there are burrs to be removed or safety wire holes to be drilled. Then I write the date of the new part install on the part where it won't show unless I'm looking for it. Overhauled my starter this weekend and made a note under the cover of mileage and date.

Then just to complete the over-engineering, I log the repair/maintence event.


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Old 04-07-2008, 10:50 AM   #214
gcb
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[quote=boldrider]
Quote:
Originally Posted by KLboxeR
Great idea for a thread. I'll bet this one's going to be around a while

Some of my tricks:

Locking medical forceps are the shit.

They are called "hemostats."
My father is an electric engineer, and always worked on equipments for laboratories that did medical analysis.

I remember that ever since I started messing around on his tools briefcase, there were more hemostats then anything else there!
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Old 04-07-2008, 12:08 PM   #215
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[quote=gcb]
Quote:
Originally Posted by boldrider

My father is an electric engineer, and always worked on equipments for laboratories that did medical analysis.

I remember that ever since I started messing around on his tools briefcase, there were more hemostats then anything else there!
They aren't called nipple clamps? Oh, I'm writing a strongly worded letter to my doctor.
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Old 04-07-2008, 02:07 PM   #216
EvilClown
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[quote=Tinks599]
Quote:
Originally Posted by gcb
They aren't called nipple clamps? Oh, I'm writing a strongly worded letter to my doctor.
Don't write it.

That's what they're called in Arkansas.














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Old 04-17-2008, 03:50 PM   #217
HaasOfSon
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PCV gasket scraper

I just came up with this last weekend when tearing down the motor on my SV.

PVC pipe makes an excellent gasket scraper. If you have a miter saw with a sharp blade, just cut the end square, and the edge of the pipe will be surprisingly sharp, but it won't hurt the metal surface. It still takes some patience to get everything removed because you can only scrape very small areas at a time, but I found it much less frustrating than a plastic putty knife, and much less scary than using a metal scraper. Some other nice things about using PVC pipe: they tend to hold static electricity so scraps of gasket tend to stick to them instead of falling into nooks and crannies; when one part of the edge gets gummed up with gasket just turn it a little for a clean piece of scraping surface; when the whole thing gets dull just trim a millimeter or so off the end with the saw. I cut mine about 8" or 9" long, and use pipe with about 1.5" outside diameter though I may get some smaller for use in tighter areas.
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Old 04-21-2008, 06:43 PM   #218
mark1305
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There just seems to be no other way to accurately shape a one-off fairing stay for race plastics other than fitting the pieces in place and tack welding the joints before removing from the bike and finishing the welds.

Here's a great trick I learned today after igniting a small spot on a brand new Air Tech upper for the Triumph while tacking a small mounting pad on the end of the stay.... ...

An insulating pad fashioned from a piece of old fashioned sheet exhaust gasket material and fitted between the metal being tack welded and the plastic/glass bodywork eliminates much of the stress and excitement when pulling the trigger on the MIG. BIG difference in heat transfer to the plastics and not thick enough to throw the dimensions out of whack.
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Old 04-26-2008, 11:50 AM   #219
swampdweller
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Thumb Motorcycle Antifreeze

I recently changed the antifreeze in my KLR and used the type that mixes with green or orange antifreeze so if I get caught short on the trail, I can use either type as makeup in the coolant system.
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Old 04-26-2008, 12:07 PM   #220
NomadRip
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorkpunch
Heres' two ideas I've got for cheap motorcycle lifts but havent tried yet:

#1- Use three tie down straps looped through the garage rafters to lift the bike off the ground- one on each side of the handlebars and one (depending on your bike) wrapped around the rear subframe. (prolly dont want to try this with your great big heavy pigs...) This would be great for changing tires if you dont have a centerstand.
I didn't trust my rafters, and needed to pull off the forks and triple-clamp, so neither of my front stands would work for that. So I had one of these ladders and some tie-downs to make it work. Worked very well strapped to the frame rails.



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Old 04-26-2008, 12:21 PM   #221
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I have one of those miserable ladders & glad to finally see a good use for it.
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Old 04-26-2008, 12:48 PM   #222
swampdweller
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Thumb

[quote=NomadRip]I didn't trust my rafters, and needed to pull off the forks and triple-clamp, so neither of my front stands would work for that. So I had one of these ladders and some tie-downs to make it work. Worked very well strapped to the frame rails.


EXCELLENT!!! I've got a motorcycle lift from JC you know who but I also have access to a similar ladder to use for that. I would have never thought of that one!!!
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Old 04-28-2008, 10:19 AM   #223
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You can use appropriately sized PVC pipe as a fork seal driver - saving you a ton of cash on those expensive seal drivers. Just remember to use a rubber coated mallet and a 2x4 on the top for even pressure all the way around the seal!
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Old 04-29-2008, 11:36 AM   #224
mejonesrebel
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brake service tools

Maybe a well known one, but for caliper service(cleaning, and pad replacement), I use a set of plastic putty knives that you can get at any hardware store, or wally world to separate the pads, then just take a standard screwdriver and push it between them to use the pads to push the pistons back into their bores, pump them out push them back in. Use high quality brake parts cleaner to clean the pistons/bores and no more hanging pistons, the same trick works after you have replaced the pads so as to not damage or dirty the pad face.

beertime who wants a
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Old 05-14-2008, 05:37 PM   #225
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I forget if this one was mentioned, but I had occasion to use it today so I thought I'd throw it out there.

This is my trick for starting those hard to reach nuts that my fat fingers can't seem to get a hold of. You just shape the zip tie to align the nut and fish it in there. The left one is a simple zip tie around the nut, the right one has a dab of hot glue on the nut to attach it. Just cut the tie or rip it out of there when the assembly is complete.

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