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Old 05-14-2008, 07:47 PM   #226
Cogswell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KLboxeR
I forget if this one was mentioned, but I had occasion to use it today so I thought I'd throw it out there.

This is my trick for starting those hard to reach nuts that my fat fingers can't seem to get a hold of. You just shape the zip tie to align the nut and fish it in there. The left one is a simple zip tie around the nut, the right one has a dab of hot glue on the nut to attach it. Just cut the tie or rip it out of there when the assembly is complete.

Good idea.

You can also put some wheel bearing grease in the end of a socket to hold the nut in while you fish it into where you need to get it started on the threads.

Mike
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Old 05-16-2008, 12:33 AM   #227
ptero
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Kind of a shop trick...

Regarding keeping track of maintenance issues, one word: Excel.

In an Excel workbook, I keep a chronological log of nearly everything with date and mileage - really just a plain old list in date order. But what's really helpful for me is a second worksheet with a list of maintenance items. Mileage is noted when last attended to.

Once in awhile, I input the current mileage into the top of a column that fills down automatically. Then every row(item) will automatically calculate mileage since last service(it's a fairly simple use of formulas - basic addition/subtraction). There is also a column for reference showing suggested intervals for each item - easy to compare each item's 'life'.

As major items need service they get added to the sheet. Like the last time the FD failed. and the last time the rear shock was rebuilt.

A hard copy of this one sheet is a huge help on long trips. A 6 week trip will see some issues come up and keeping track is easy with this one sheet.

It's really great for a fast view of overall status of systems. Enter today's mileage and see where things stand.
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Old 05-16-2008, 06:15 AM   #228
slide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewarax
Good idea.

You can also put some wheel bearing grease in the end of a socket to hold the nut in while you fish it into where you need to get it started on the threads.

Mike
Also there are some manufacturers who make magnetic inserts to put in your sockets which will hold the nuts. I THINK Griot's Garage is one vendor.
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Old 05-17-2008, 12:13 AM   #229
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Heavy duty milk crates are great for working on tires (the sprocket/rotor won't get scraped on the floor or damaged).

Buy two 99 cent squirt bottle from CVS or walmart. Keep one in the garage with water in it. Makes it much easier to work with polyurethane glue.
Fill the other one with extra virgin olive oil and keep it in the kitchen. It works much better than those silly and way overpriced pump & spray oil things.

Always use someone elses garage. Oil spills are unavoidable.

Every time you stay at a hotel, ask for lots of the free toothbrushes. Work great for cleaning things.

"Torque to spec" does NOT mean "Until it starts stripping"

After taking something apart and putting it back together, sell the leftover parts on eBay. People buy anything.

Scissor-style car jacks work on bikes, too. They're especially great for putting in a new shock.

KY-lube is great for mounting new tires.

Tire lube is NOT great for sex.

Get a super-strong small rare earth magnet. Stick it on your screwdriver, near the handle. It will magnetize the whole thing, so that your screws won't fall off when you're working in tight places.

Don't use that screwdriver to remove computer hard drives.

Wrench too big? Stick a dime in there to shim it.

That's all I can think of right now.
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Old 05-17-2008, 05:50 AM   #230
Mercury264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slide
Also there are some manufacturers who make magnetic inserts to put in your sockets which will hold the nuts. I THINK Griot's Garage is one vendor.
I was going to mention this also. I think I got mine from Sears.
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Old 05-18-2008, 12:25 AM   #231
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I find using a light with an outlet buit into it like this one http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/ALR-13RF30GR.html is incredibly handy. Its never in your way, but always handy. It also cuts down on the number of cords laying on the ground to trip over. Plus it never gets tangled with itself or with other cords.

For used oil I use an old large gascan. when it gets full just run it down to the oil recycler, dump it and take it back home.
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Old 05-18-2008, 06:36 AM   #232
slide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by summitteer

For used oil I use an old large gascan. when it gets full just run it down to the oil recycler, dump it and take it back home.
I have several 5 gal gas cans labeled for what sort of hazmat they contain.

Just a note, guys for those who don't know. Jiffy Lube and Pep Boys will take your old oil in for free. They resell it to recyclers so everybody wins. I'm sure there are other oil drop off places but since I have both close to me, that's who I use.

There is a national chain called Batteries Plus which will take in your batteries. Again, they make money on the recycle so all win.

Remember, if you toss this stuff in the general trash, it's like poisoning our children's food.
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Old 05-18-2008, 06:51 AM   #233
Skippii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slide
I have several 5 gal gas cans labeled for what sort of hazmat they contain.

Just a note, guys for those who don't know. Jiffy Lube and Pep Boys will take your old oil in for free. They resell it to recyclers so everybody wins. I'm sure there are other oil drop off places but since I have both close to me, that's who I use.

There is a national chain called Batteries Plus which will take in your batteries. Again, they make money on the recycle so all win.

Remember, if you toss this stuff in the general trash, it's like poisoning our children's food.
Any Autozone or Advanced Auto Parts will also take oil for free.
So will Walmart, actually.

Any oil-changing shop will take your oil and pour it into their oil furnace, saving them lots on their heating bill.

All Lowes and Home Depot locations will take any battery for free as well.
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Old 05-18-2008, 12:43 PM   #234
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Love Bugs

The easiest way to remove love bugs from you helmet, windshield, bumper, fairings ets is to use a sheet of fabric softner and a dab of water...

Dont ask me how it works but you wet the piece of fabric softener and rub the love bugs and they come right off without hurting the surface at all...You will need to wipe the area afterwards with some water and a clean cloth but WOW does it work!!!!

I saw this on a Sunday ride when an oldtimer had a box of Bounce in his tank bag and I asked him why he carried that....

I owe this man a beer or two or three....LOL
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Old 05-19-2008, 12:11 AM   #235
Cedartree
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A couple of tricks from work...

1. Just ran out of replacement blades for the utility knife or need a long, thin, flexible blade for cutting something waaay to deep to reach with anything else?

Have I got a deal for you...

Get a chunk of fuel hose or whatever that fits over half the length of an old hacksaw blade for a handle(do this first, avoiding an unplanned visit to the ER), grind the teeth off the other half, sharpen it to a suitable edge, and there you have it, instant shop knife that lasts forever, can be made from stuff found in the average shop, and recycles a hacksaw blade that would otherwise be tossed. I made one three years ago and use it at least once a month.

2. VEGETABLE OIL OR BUTTER OR MARGARINE will work if you are out of hand cleaner. Don't laugh, it will cut grease, tar, tree sap, and GK what else ends up on your hands. Takes a little longer but IT WORKS. It acts as an emulsifier and then you just wash up with soap and (hot) water. This is way nicer to your skin then using gas or solvents if you run out of your usual brand. IT WORKS. Or you could use those nitrile gloves...
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Old 05-19-2008, 04:15 AM   #236
Bruce Caldwell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slide
Also there are some manufacturers who make magnetic inserts to put in your sockets which will hold the nuts. I THINK Griot's Garage is one vendor.
Saw some at my local Sears store the other day for both fractional & metric sockets for about $10 bucks a set.
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Old 11-23-2008, 07:20 AM   #237
Chickenstrip
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Socks, calipers, and rim protection

When removing brake calipers I put an old sock over the caliper so that when I pull it out of position, if by chance it hits the rim (which it has in my case), it doesn't chip the finish (which it unfortunately did once or twice).
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Old 11-23-2008, 08:57 AM   #238
wos
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egg cartons- great for storing little bits you want to keep seperated and organised, some even have little locking bits on them to securely stack. I like the paper ones as you can write on them.

big piece of cardboard- old refrigerator boxes or the most useful stuff that IKEA makes (the box the stuff comes in). throw it down when doing something messy, kneel on them instead of cement or slide around on it like a creeper.

Those two foot or so carpet samples- see above. talk to your local flooring shop, they discontinue carpet all the time so they usually have some to throw away.

Dental picks- great for getting in where you can't get your meathooks, pop out o-rings easily, pick up that nut you just dropped down the camchain tunnel, just down use them as prying tools as the tips can break off and a bit of surgical steel stuck inside a motor is something I don't want to see.

forceps or surgical clamps- the curved ones are the best.

Honey grease- also called plug grease. should be able to get it anywhere a pipefitter or plumber shops. Very thick grease looks and feels like cold honey. put a dab on the end of a stick to fish out the nut you just dropped. stick a nut to the end of a wrench to stick it on the bolt way under there.

Knee pads- really nice if you have to crawl around all day even the ones designed for volleyball players work well.

The outlet thingy that goes into a light socket- My radio hangs from the roof, comes on when the light is on.

ear protection, eye protection.- any tool in the shop that requires it has a set hanging beside it. Protective glasses hang in the end of a sock that has reached the end of its life cycle.

Cheap camera pouch - Camera pouches zip tied to handle bars, useful to hold small stuff like cameras earplugs glasses etc.

lockwire (safety wire or picture hanging wire) - useful, comes in little packable rolls, used to secure stuff, to pick up stuff. a fifty foot roll of .032 should last several years.
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Old 11-24-2008, 06:35 AM   #239
byker
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I mark 1 link on the chain with red nail polish. This way I know where I started oiling the chain without going around several times because of guess work.
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Old 11-24-2008, 10:36 AM   #240
P B G
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Searched this thread, I may have missed it rather it could have been mentioned. But the use of a box end wrench to increase leverage on a combination open/box end wrench. I know most people who work on stuff know this trick, but I figured hey some might not, and might as well put it on here.

Situation nut won't come loose, can't fit a socket/breaker bar into the location. Solution, take a box end wrench that fits the nut/bolt head, get it on the head of the nut. Take another box end wrench and interlock the box with the tines of the first wrench's open end.



reverse to tighten.
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