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Old 11-24-2008, 04:59 PM   #241
mark1305
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Location: Merritt Island, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P B G
Searched this thread, I may have missed it rather it could have been mentioned. But the use of a box end wrench to increase leverage on a combination open/box end wrench. I know most people who work on stuff know this trick, but I figured hey some might not, and might as well put it on here.

Situation nut won't come loose, can't fit a socket/breaker bar into the location. Solution, take a box end wrench that fits the nut/bolt head, get it on the head of the nut. Take another box end wrench and interlock the box with the tines of the first wrench's open end.



reverse to tighten.
This trick combines well with another when makinga tool kit from scratch for a bike that came without one (like my R80 ST). I bought a metric stubby open/box end wrench set from Harbor Fright and used just the sizes needed on the bike knowing that stubbies cam be used in tandem as above to get adequate leverage.
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Old 11-24-2008, 05:28 PM   #242
P B G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305
This trick combines well with another when makinga tool kit from scratch for a bike that came without one (like my R80 ST). I bought a metric stubby open/box end wrench set from Harbor Fright and used just the sizes needed on the bike knowing that stubbies cam be used in tandem as above to get adequate leverage.
That and it can be better than a ratchet handle of the same length because it has less offset. So when you put rotational force onto the fastener the wrench doesn't want to twist.
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Old 11-25-2008, 06:13 AM   #243
scooteraug02
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Just found out most of the local auto parts stores will rent you tools for FREE.

I was told you buy the tool then return it in good condition for a full refund. So the deposit is equal to the price of the tool. O'Rielly's had seperate rental tools so they don't mess up all the new ones. Advanced auto supposedly does the same thing.

Reminded of the time I went to buy 26mm socket. There was an empty package and another package with the socket in it. This policy must increase sales and cut down on theft.
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Old 11-25-2008, 10:08 AM   #244
P B G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scooteraug02
Just found out most of the local auto parts stores will rent you tools for FREE.
Yup autozone is deposit which is refunded, including the sales tax.

Things like sockets you should just buy to own, you'll need em eventually. Things like perhaps a gear puller or slide hammer. For sure rent.

Autozone also has alot of vehicle specific tools for rental. Which could be helpful.
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Old 11-26-2008, 06:05 PM   #245
ibafran
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I have met a bike dealer or two who will 'sell' me a factory tool and give me my money back if I return the tool in great shape. I could see that the tool had been used many times. The parts counter guy will know if such a tool is available. Its understood that if you bung up the tool, its yours for the price of a new one to re-start the 'loaner program'.
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Old 12-01-2008, 03:17 PM   #246
e.Rock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wos
egg cartons- great for storing little bits you want to keep seperated and organised, some even have little locking bits on them to securely stack. I like the paper ones as you can write on them.
I read through 16 pages to make sure nobody already mentioned this, but +1 on the egg cartons. I keep several in the garage at all times. My favorite use is for bodywork fasteners. I label one end with "FRONT" and put the fasteners in as I take them off, the egg pairs are great for keeping track of left and right sides. Close them, put them on the shelf and do your work. They're in the same order when you're ready to put the bodywork back on.

-E
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Old 01-07-2009, 11:53 AM   #247
HowlingMad
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rolling tool eyesore

Thought this was interesting. Not my style (hate peg board) but thought it clever. Tools on wheels are always a good idea.







Full story here.
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Old 01-08-2009, 02:35 PM   #248
FistFullofDirt
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coupla things

Take you old desk top computer out to the garage. That way you can look at all the pictures you took when reassembling stuff. Its also useful for looking up parts, etc. I have the computer part on a shelf, and the screen and key board mounted on a platform thats welded to a pipe going up to the ceiling. This makes it a little flexible in case you hit it with something ( or in frusteration )

Also, the set of drawers under the work bench is now mounted on a cart with swivley wheels. The tools can be at hand wherever, and the top is good for working on things at a more waist height. When the job is done, just put the cart back under the workbench.
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Old 01-08-2009, 02:47 PM   #249
JaySoy
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Not really a trick, but something I find super convient if you take your bike apart as much as I seem to.

I hate dealing with stipped out Phillips heads and starting in hex head bolts with the tip of my finger (like for seats and stuff).

I'm slowly ousting all the bolts on my bikes in favor of these:




So I can use one of these instead of a screw driver or rachet.

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Old 01-09-2009, 06:59 AM   #250
Jonex
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Electric angle grinders are about the handiest tools ever. I must have 10,000 hours on mine by now, and I made it even handier:

I took a 5/8-11 nut, turned its corners off on my mini lathe, and welded it to a short stump of stainless round stock which has a 3/8 threaded hole in it (and a matching relief cut in its end to receive the 5/8" nut).

This piece is an adapter for cut off wheels and they're spaced out from the handle so it's very usable. Now I don't have to run the air compressor every time I want to lop off a hunk of something.
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Old 01-09-2009, 08:24 AM   #251
Jonex
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Need to mix up a little bit epoxy?

Stomp on a beer/soda can, and use its bottom as a mixing container. It's the perfect size and shape - the epoxy doesn't run away from the mixing stick as easy as when using a flat surface.

When you're done, throw out the can. If you save your cans, it's a tiny bit heavier now. Shhhhhh......
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:56 AM   #252
ridewestKTM
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Is this new?

When threading a shaft with a die I have always found that it won't track straight. This time I got a piece of threaded rod the same as the desired and put the shaft in my tail stock. Then I screwed the die onto that threaded rod -backward (ie not "start this way). Then put trhe shaft to thread into the headstock and put the shafts end to end with some pressure. Holding the head motionless I turned the die towards the new shaft.
It really went straight.

new or not new?
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:27 PM   #253
scooteraug02
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonex522
Need to mix up a little bit epoxy?

Stomp on a beer/soda can, and use its bottom as a mixing container. It's the perfect size and shape - the epoxy doesn't run away from the mixing stick as easy as when using a flat surface.

When you're done, throw out the can. If you save your cans, it's a tiny bit heavier now. Shhhhhh......
I use the plastic from laundry detergent containers. I can cut out mini application knifes/blades out of the plastic as well as little plates. Epoxy can run away with my method though unless you use the bottom part.
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:59 PM   #254
2wheelsrbest
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1--You CAN reuse regular zipties most times. To un-do one, slip the point of a small screwdriver or otherwise pointy object between notched side of tie and the catch. Pry back the catch and it will release.

2--When you replace the head of your Sonicare toothbrush head, grab the little magnets off the base. They are glued on, but easily removed with pliers. Stout little magnets are useful for all sorts of stuff.

3--Sheets of cardboard were mentioned earlier. Bicycle shops are a good source of them, if you need another source.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:22 PM   #255
markjenn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2wheelsrbest
1--You CAN reuse regular zipties most times. To un-do one, slip the point of a small screwdriver or otherwise pointy object between notched side of tie and the catch. Pry back the catch and it will release.
Wow, this IS being frugal. Zip ties at HF run about .7 cents apiece.

- Mark
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