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Old 02-15-2012, 05:39 PM   #661
ttpete
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All I can say is if you've never tried the orange citrus stuff, get a small bottle and try it. It's magic and doesn't irritate the skin.
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Old 02-15-2012, 06:33 PM   #662
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Amen to dat. Gojo is a must if you wrench on your own stuff. I used to go threw that magical stuff every two months. Until I worked at a tattoo shop. I had to wear latex gloves almost all day, before I couldn't wear gloves because I couldn't feel what I was doing. Now I don't feel right with out them. Perfect for the quick oil change or a all day rebuild.

Now I'm in luck too. The dealership I work for gets them at a discount because of the bulk amount they order. They sold be 10 boxes for 10 bucks. Life time supply! Or atleast 6 months
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Old 02-16-2012, 11:53 AM   #663
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I'm solidly in the nitrile glove camp for wrenching as well. besides just making clean up (and pee breaks) easier, there's some stuff around the shop that i'd just rather not have in my cuts. keep an eye out for harbor freight coupons.
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Old 02-16-2012, 12:13 PM   #664
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Originally Posted by groundrules View Post
I'm solidly in the nitrile glove camp for wrenching as well. besides just making clean up (and pee breaks) easier, there's some stuff around the shop that i'd just rather not have in my cuts. keep an eye out for harbor freight coupons.
I found that the nitrile gloves would rip too easily and mechanics gloves didn't provide enough 'feel' so I cut the tips of the thumb and first finger of the mechanics gloves and then since they get real oily/dirty I wear the nitrile gloves underneath. This way, I pretty much get the best of both worlds. If the tips of the nitrile gloves rip at least the only dirty bit of my hands are the tips of my thumb and first finger.
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Old 02-16-2012, 12:17 PM   #665
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I found that the nitrile gloves would rip too easily and mechanics gloves didn't provide enough 'feel' so I cut the tips of the thumb and first finger of the mechanics gloves and then since they get real oily/dirty I wear the nitrile gloves underneath. This way, I pretty much get the best of both worlds. If the tips of the nitrile gloves rip at least the only dirty bit of my hands are the tips of my thumb and first finger.
yeah, not a bad idea. Nitrile is less flexible than latex, so it is prone to ripping. i often double up on nitriles too, which helps. I use the cheap, thin nitriles for basic stuff that isn't a high wear situation, then i also keep a box of thicker mil nitriles around too for jobs where I think getting torn up is a likely possibility. I think standard nitriles are about 5 mil, the think ones are like 9 mil and are pretty damn tough, but still have decent feel.
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:57 PM   #666
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Originally Posted by Nytelyte View Post

Found out the other night that the crappy malt liquor Mickey's (brother bought it as a joke as repayment for a 6pack of homebrew) bottles are EXCELLENT as catch cans for brake bleeding on the Wrangler. They wedge up right in there, you can see through them and everything. Then just cap and toss them.
Wouldn't want to be the bum that finds that in the trash and thinks he scored big time.
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:04 PM   #667
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My zip up riding boots fit great but getting them on is hard due to a slightly narrow ankle. But a trick my Mom used in grade school to get my snow boots on came to mind . Use a piece of wax paper on your heel , and in you go, smooth as silk.Way to go Mom!!!!!!
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:05 PM   #668
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Originally Posted by charliemik View Post
...
Easy-out pointer; I've had marginal luck using easy-outs to get out the remains of a busted off bolt. One thing to think about is, use the smallest easy-out that you think will get the job done. I used to go the other way and use the biggest but it's easier for the bigger drill bit to wander out into the threads, damaging them. Also, as you drive the tapered easy-out into the remaining section of bolt it's exerting outward force that's helping to lock the threads even tighter into the hole. My success rate improved by going smaller.

another note on drilling broken off bolts that are broken down in a hole, and are slanted, or odd-shaped and prevent you from drilling them in the center....

assuming you know what size / thread the bolt is, go get a good same-sized bolt with a head thats either flat, or slightly concave... If you have a lathe this is super easy, but if not its still possible. Drill a hole through the good bolt (easy to start if its flat), then thread it into the hole, and use it as a drill bit guide to center up on the broken bolt.




Epoxy: just use a wide piece of masking tape on the table or even the floor to mix up the epoxy... then, once its dry, pull up the tape and toss it out, no mess.
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Old 02-17-2012, 04:02 AM   #669
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Originally Posted by MagyarMan View Post
... boots ...getting them on is hard... Use a piece of wax paper on your heel..
I imagine the waxed paper would only last one time. You could probably use a plastic grocery bag instead.
I have some rubber over boots that go over your riding boots to keep your boots/feet dry. About the only way to get them on is to put one of those plastic grocery bags over your boot first. Slide right in. Yeah, the bag just stays in there, but wouldn’t if you just stuck it over your heel temporarily.
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Old 02-17-2012, 04:59 AM   #670
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Originally Posted by B.Curvin View Post
I haven't seen my favorite tip here (might have missed it though)
Is removing your kickstand spring a big pain in the buttocks?
Get all your coins out. While your bike is on a rear or center stand, put the kick stand in the extended (down) position.
Take previously mentioned coins and jam as many as possible between the coils of the spring.
Move kick stand to the retracted (up) position. If it's like my SVs, XR-R, DR, KLR, CB, Tiger etc
the spring will fall off in your hand.
Installation is conveniently the opposite of removal.
No more spring pullin knuckle bustin hernia causin silliness.
That’s a pretty old post but I guess I never got around to posting this.

After getting this blown out KTM pre-muffler thing welded up I was trying to get those springs back on.



They are small & very stiff & strong. I don’t remember how I got them off but getting them back on was a real bear. Couldn’t hold ‘em with vicegrips very well. When I did try I had to hold the kickstand with one foot because the bike kept moving even in gear. I was straining pretty hard to pull them back. I tried getting something between the coils like the coin trick above. No way was that happening. Too small, too tight. Difficult to even bend them enough to get a thin washer between the coils. A coin sure wouldn’t fit. Nothing was working.
WTF to do? On my junk cluttered bench I spot this automotive hose clamp, the type I never use. I just keep every piece of junk around....
Hmm...



Stuck the thing on the spring’s hook & now had something that I could get a real good grip onto with the vicegrips. Pulled the springs right on then just rotated that clamp around to slide it off the springs between the split/overlap in the clamp.
Worked like a champ & now I have a new tool.
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Old 02-17-2012, 12:50 PM   #671
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Originally Posted by Tom S View Post
I imagine the waxed paper would only last one time. You could probably use a plastic grocery bag instead.
I have some rubber over boots that go over your riding boots to keep your boots/feet dry. About the only way to get them on is to put one of those plastic grocery bags over your boot first. Slide right in. Yeah, the bag just stays in there, but wouldn’t if you just stuck it over your heel temporarily.

That'll work!! However when I was in grade school they hadn't invented plastic bags yet. I think I just gave away my age!!!!!
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Old 02-17-2012, 01:36 PM   #672
ttpete
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Originally Posted by MagyarMan View Post
That'll work!! However when I was in grade school they hadn't invented plastic bags yet. I think I just gave away my age!!!!!
That's the way all of my sandwiches were wrapped when I was in school, too! Waxed paper.
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Old 02-17-2012, 04:54 PM   #673
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Exhaust spring tool can be made out of an old hooked spoke. Spokes are pretty tough. Grind or file the flange end of the spoke leaving clearence as you like. Some exhaust springs and loops are big enough that the spoke flange may not need a grind. Cut off a piece of old broom handle to make a t-bar handle for the spoke. Drill a hole across the handle to fit the spoke and put the nipple back on. If you want to get fancy, counter sink the nipple. Add a small washer to the nipple if you are worried about pull-through by a too small nipple. Tool will do a lot of other springs too, sidestand, centerstand, brake pedal return spring. If you have a bunch of spokes, make a bunch of tools without grinds.

Same tool without the flange grind makes an excellent skate lace tightener.

Broken brake/clutch cable can be formed into a loop that goes from the spring hook to a t-bar. The loop technique lets one adjust the size and use the lever action of a broom stick against a frame tube or other handy fulcrum for an easy stretch and precise placement control.

Grabbing the spring with pliers is about the last thing that I do unless the spring is very weak.

As for donning tight boots, I use a long, double-ended shoehorn like those given to senior citizens. The stainless steel ones seem to work the best. I usually have 2-3 plactic grocery bags stuffed into my Totes-like rubber rain boots so I got 'em when I need 'em.
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ibafran screwed with this post 02-17-2012 at 05:00 PM
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Old 02-17-2012, 06:50 PM   #674
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Exhaust spring tool can be made out of an old hooked spoke.
Brilliant!
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Old 02-17-2012, 10:34 PM   #675
Tom S
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Originally Posted by MagyarMan View Post
That'll work!! However when I was in grade school they hadn't invented plastic bags yet.
When I was in grade school they hadn't even invented school or waxed paper yet. We used a new invention, dirt.
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