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Old 07-02-2012, 12:11 PM   #736
aposaric
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When you have stuck pistons on your old brake calipers, especialy when you are on the road, the easyest way to get them out is to put a 13 mm ( or something simmilar in size) wrench in your caliper between the pistons, so it acts as a limiter. It prevents the "unstuck" pots to jump out.

1. put a wrench between the pots - secure it with some duct tape.
2. unscrew the bleed niple for few turns
3. atach a bike tire pump ( or a compressed air ) to the niple
4. pump the air and wait for the pots to slowly start to go out. first the loose ones are going to go out, keep pumping and make enough pressure to loosen the stuck ones ( you can use some wd 40 to help the stuck ones )
5. Once the all pots are moving, take your rubbler pliers and just pull all of the pots out, clean the oil passages and all of the servicing you were planing in the begining

My camera is dead so no pictures at the moment to make it a little bit easier to understand :-)

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Old 07-02-2012, 01:49 PM   #737
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I always do the same but just crank on the brakes and see if that will do before using air pressure.

Usually if that gets them moving they'll come out will little fuss.
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Old 07-02-2012, 01:55 PM   #738
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Originally Posted by P B G View Post
I always do the same but just crank on the brakes and see if that will do before using air pressure.

Usually if that gets them moving they'll come out will little fuss.
You should be able to generate considerably more pressure by squeezing the brake lever than you could get out of an air compressor. But I've never tried to unstick a stuck caliper piston, so what do I know?
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Old 07-02-2012, 02:31 PM   #739
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Originally Posted by scottrnelson View Post
You should be able to generate considerably more pressure by squeezing the brake lever than you could get out of an air compressor. But I've never tried to unstick a stuck caliper piston, so what do I know?
Ya I've never used the airtool thing either.

Air pressure behind a metal projectile is a gun.
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Old 07-02-2012, 02:35 PM   #740
aposaric
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Originally Posted by P B G View Post
I always do the same but just crank on the brakes and see if that will do before using air pressure.

Usually if that gets them moving they'll come out will little fuss.
Usualy it works on the newer bikes, but I just finished servicing on a 22 year old tokico 4 pots from a zzr 600 d, and on each caliper 2 pots were stuck on one side, so only one side worked. If you pump the brake to much you just bend the disc, so my way it is much easier, and a lot cheaper because you don't bend a 300$ discs :-) . Most of the air compressors wil go to 8 bar presure, at least the ones on the gass stations, but even a 5$ hand bycicle pump will go over 12 bars if you put your muscles into it :-) I found a tons of 22 year old gunk inside, all rubbery and gelly shit, but after thurally cleaning it with wd 40 and carb cleaner ( amazing stuff, even removes the old paint from the calipers. I just replaced the rubber seals, put the new oil inside and they work amazing, as good as new, alhough 4 pot tokicos from the nineties are shit to begin with ;-)
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Old 07-02-2012, 09:09 PM   #741
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At least on the car side of things (never heard #'s for bikes) vacum assisted brakes generate in the area of 1100psi (with hydroboost brakes being double that) if thats not enough to break the pistons loose 200psi of air isnt going to cut it. Now I will admit both those numbers are for power assisted brakes but manual brakes shouldnt be to far off. (personally I find a good grease gun works better as it also helps lube them as it forces the pistons out.)
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:32 PM   #742
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At least on the car side of things (never heard #'s for bikes) vacum assisted brakes generate in the area of 1100psi (with hydroboost brakes being double that) if thats not enough to break the pistons loose 200psi of air isnt going to cut it. Now I will admit both those numbers are for power assisted brakes but manual brakes shouldnt be to far off. (personally I find a good grease gun works better as it also helps lube them as it forces the pistons out.)

Then you flush out all that grease?

In regards to crushing the rotor... one would assume you do this job with the wrench stuck through there, or a c-clamp around it anyway, and not on the rotor.
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:09 PM   #743
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I've got into the habit of putting dates on anything that could "spoil" over time. Stuff like paint, car wax, rain X, JB weld, sealants, threadlocker, etc. I always had a problem under-estimating how old some of my stuff actually is.
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Old 07-05-2012, 01:17 AM   #744
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I've got into the habit of putting dates on anything that could "spoil" over time. Stuff like paint, car wax, rain X, JB weld, sealants, threadlocker, etc. I always had a problem under-estimating how old some of my stuff actually is.
Another good thing to write the date on is the batteries in your smoke/CO detectors.
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Old 07-05-2012, 02:05 AM   #745
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Another good thing to write the date on is the batteries in your smoke/CO detectors.
always replace them on ur birthday
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Old 07-05-2012, 04:35 AM   #746
PineyMountainRacing
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Lord Help You if You Break One of Those Curly Fry Lights. EPA disaster zone, better not tell anybody.
So what's the deal with these bulbs? I use them in the shop because they don't get so hot. But I have broken a few.
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Old 07-05-2012, 05:18 AM   #747
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So what's the deal with these bulbs? I use them in the shop because they don't get so hot. But I have broken a few.

Just like any flourescent, they contain mercury. Which is in a vaporized form while the bulb is running.
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Old 07-05-2012, 05:32 AM   #748
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Just like any flourescent, they contain mercury. Which is in a vaporized form while the bulb is running.
In 20 years they will be like asbestos, a seemingly good idea (forced on the public), but really a very bad idea.

The slight savings in electricity is far offset by the environmental damage, not to mention the high initial cost, and not nearly as long a life as predicted.

Jim

PS I use them in my video lighting systems because they do not put out much heat.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:42 AM   #749
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Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
In 20 years they will be like asbestos, a seemingly good idea (forced on the public), but really a very bad idea.

The slight savings in electricity is far offset by the environmental damage, not to mention the high initial cost, and not nearly as long a life as predicted.

*snip*
They can be had cheaply and it enables me to run 4 lights on the exterior of my home for the cost of one incandescent. Mercury is good for you! The government just knows that if we all had balls of it to play with, we wouldn't get any work done.

Side note - I have IE spell running and it wants to change your screen name to "Cambodian". Just thought that was funny for some reason.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:43 AM   #750
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Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
In 20 years they will be like asbestos, a seemingly good idea (forced on the public), but really a very bad idea.

The slight savings in electricity is far offset by the environmental damage, not to mention the high initial cost, and not nearly as long a life as predicted.

Jim

PS I use them in my video lighting systems because they do not put out much heat.
More than a slight savings. The equivalent to a 100 watt incandescent in lumens draws only 23 watts.

LEDs are even more efficient, and once they get the price down, they'll obsolete CFLs. I have LED yard lighting that replaces four 100 watt incandescent floods and draws only about 30 watts.
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