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Old 09-09-2007, 12:35 PM   #76
TUCKERS
the famous james
 
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Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA.
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Tips

Taking the top bolts (under the plastic cap) off Oilhead fork legs? Works for other bolts too: 1st, pour BOILING water on the offending area, NOT hot water, bubbling, boiling water, then SOAK the grungy, dried up, crappy area with penetrating oil. Go back in the house and boil more water, have a cup of tea, wait about one hour. Take another look at the offending bolt. Put a socket or wrench on it, then tap it heartily with a small hammer, making sure the wrench is well on and the bolt gets a shock. Stare it down and say nice, but stern things to it, like, "Okay you bastidge, here goes, come off mi little beautiful", (it really helps if you use an Irish accent.) If it even 'starts' to round off, STOP. Go back in the house and boil more water, make more tea. My dad always told me, "when in doubt lad, brew up"...never failed me yet. James the Tucker
ps. The boiling water trick is also good for cleaning off crud from battery connections. Don't believe me? Open the hood of your car, see that green shit all around your battery connection? Take BOILING water, not hot, but BUBBLING, boiling water and pour it on...watch the crap go away.
We used to boil our carb bodies too, just pop it in the pan and cook for a few minutes, works a treat, really.
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Old 09-09-2007, 05:46 PM   #77
lightsorce OP
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Location: Northeast North Carolina
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Laugh Sticker Removal

This one has worked for me. Those paper stickers with the UPC codes or prices on 'em..... soak a paper towel with rubbing alcohol an lay it on the offending sticker for about 20 minutes. They come right off.
Not sure if it works on decals or plastic stickers but I may try it next time...
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Old 09-09-2007, 08:56 PM   #78
bryantjt
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WD-40 also removes offending stickers easily.
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Old 09-10-2007, 01:21 PM   #79
YamaGeek
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Joined: Jun 2007
Location: western oregon
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Battery tips;

Make yourself some multiple, off bike, C/10 battery tenders from old wall wart AC\DC chargers-converters, a power strip and a 24 hour timer. You'll need a good DVOM to check polarity and voltage out. You're looking for the ~12v wall chargers that accumulate at Goodwill or StuVedePuh in the electronics/toys shelves.

Check the potential wallwart for voltage and milliamperes out, usually listed on the back with the UL trademark, as it is good to NOT cook your battery with too powerfull a charger. Usually 1/10 or less of the battery's amp hour capacity is fine. When you get your chargers home, hook them up to the DVOM (digital Volt ohm meter and check for polarity and voltage. Anything running over 13 volts but not over 18 volts open circuit will suffice. Milliamps out is important, usually the more physically larger the wallwart, the more current it can supply.

I'd go to Radio Shack and get some black and red vinyl covered alligator clips and solder them onto the proper leads of the wall warts. Some wall wart's lead outs are color coded with a white stripe for positive, but this isn't always the case. And is why you should check your polarity out. If the number showing on your DVOM has a negative(-) in front of the voltage reading you've connected the positive DVOM lead to the negative lead, ( and vis-versa) of the wallwart. Double check this, it could burn up the wallwart and or ruin your battery.

Once all the wall warts are checked and have clips on their leads, set up the timer for 2 hours on and 22 hours off. Plug in the power strip to the timer and install the chargers. Before plugging this assembly into the 110 volt AC wall socket, set the timer so the "off" tab has just gone past the pointer for the on-off escapement/switch of the timer, and set the timer to be "on". Then plug it in. What this will do is make for an initial 24 hour "on" cycle followed by a daily series of 2 hour "on" cycles to "maintain" the voltage. This is good for any bike coming off storage or infrequent winter use. Also good for bikes in gagrages that get cold at night, though batteries stored at these temps will take longer to charge. This is also a good regimen for prepping new, "precharged" batteries.

This should be done only with batteries removed from the bikes, and in a well ventilated area, think hydrogen gas, the Hindenburg...

One thing that helps also, is to make sure the wall wart selected, works well with the battery selected. You don't want a charger that vigorously boils the electrolyte, size the charger to the battery. A good check for this is a charger that brings the voltage of a healthy, fully charged battery up to about 13.6~14.4 volts after several hours of charging. If you trust your DVOM ability to read milliamps, do a charge reading by hooking up the DVOM in series with positive out lead of the wallwart with the DVOM set to the 10 amp position. Anything around 1/10 of the battery's amp-hour capacity, say like a 8 amp hour battery should get no more than 0.8 amps of charge, less is better an any case in this regard.

They do make proper voltage regulated, battery tender chargers, what I've found is that some of them aren't precisely voltage trimmed and will either under charge, (more likely..) or over voltage the battery. This DIY is for setting up an economical slow charging station for folks who own a couple, or a herd of bikes.
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:10 PM   #80
4SEVEN3
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Location: Whitsett, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emoto
Whenever you are working on your handlebars or instrument area, take a thick terrycloth bath towel and drape it over the gas tank. When you drop a wrench or screwdriver, you won't ding the tank
Grandma's rubberized bathroom rug works good too, the clean one of corse!

Got some threads buggerd up and no die/tap set? Take a bolt of same diameter/pitch and cut 3 groves with a dremel or grindingwheel in it starting from the bottom going up at maybe a 60deg angle or so. Operate like you would a tap and it might get you out of a pinch.

I also use the porcelan end of a sparkplug to plug larger diameter lines where fluid might leak out. Works good in the car world.
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:26 PM   #81
Scrubs
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Location: Leeds, UK
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Sugar and washing up liquid makes cheap 'Swarfega'
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Old 09-11-2007, 04:25 AM   #82
praetorian
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Location: South-Central L.A. (Leland(NC) Area that is!)
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Next time your using GoJo on yur hands and it gets "MOST" of the crap off, squirt a little Dawn dish detergent on your hnds and mix it with he GoJo. My wife wants to figure out how to combine the 2 and sell it as a new product. It works amazingly.

+1 on the bath mat to protect the tank. I have several bath mats in the garage. They are good to kneel on, too. They are thick and the rubber backing keeps them from migrating out from under your knees. They are also small enough to move around easily. I also have one in front of my work bench that stays there as a padded mat for me to stand on to help with foot fatigue.
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Old 09-12-2007, 08:38 AM   #83
BobbyC
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Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praetorian
Next time your using GoJo on yur hands and it gets "MOST" of the crap off, squirt a little Dawn dish detergent on your hnds and mix it with he GoJo. My wife wants to figure out how to combine the 2 and sell it as a new product. It works amazingly.
I usually use a stiff bristle brush and regular hand soap (Dial) to clean my hands/fingernails after using GoJo to take most of the grime off.
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:00 AM   #84
Scrubs
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Anyone got any good tips on old gasket removal?
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:04 AM   #85
BobbyC
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Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrubs
Anyone got any good tips on old gasket removal?
Besides a razor blade?

Keep the blade low so it doesn't nick the metal (and it will).
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:12 AM   #86
Scrubs
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yeah its already nicking the metal so I wondered if there was any household
wonder solution I could squirt and soak it with to ease it a bit
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:25 AM   #87
BobbyC
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Lay the razor almost flat against the metal and that should help. I've also used a scotch brite to get stuff off after using a razor but only if you can wash the part with the gasket (case cracked and off the bike).
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Old 09-12-2007, 09:58 AM   #88
CR_TurboGuy
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Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
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I saw this in regards to an oil wrench, over in this thread and thought it looked like something that should be here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey
If your wrench is spinning, get a piece of adhesive sandpaper and stick it on the inside of your wrench. You need to clean it first so it sticks obviously but it makes it grab a lot.
--JOsh
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Old 09-12-2007, 11:01 AM   #89
comes naturally
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrubs
yeah its already nicking the metal so I wondered if there was any household
wonder solution I could squirt and soak it with to ease it a bit
Try a plastic drywall spackling trowel.
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Old 09-12-2007, 11:44 AM   #90
dorkpunch
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Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Blackfoot, ID
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Heres' two ideas I've got for cheap motorcycle lifts but havent tried yet:

#1- Use three tie down straps looped through the garage rafters to lift the bike off the ground- one on each side of the handlebars and one (depending on your bike) wrapped around the rear subframe. (prolly dont want to try this with your great big heavy pigs...) This would be great for changing tires if you dont have a centerstand.

#2- Build a lift table using the rear half of an old snowmobile. I'm actually working on this one... You need a sled with the right type of slider suspension. The one i'm using came from a '75 Ski-doo T'NT 440. cut the back half of the sled off between the front suspension mounting bolts and the drive cogs for the track. Loose the track and take all the useless crap off. Flip it over and now you might see where i'm going with this- the suspension goes up and down and if you were to cut/add about 2 feet of steel between the mounting bolts and the skid, it would give you a 3 ft tall table when lifted. Still working out how to do the lifting part though...
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