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Old 09-12-2007, 11:48 AM   #91
Scrubs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by comes naturally
Try a plastic drywall spackling trowel.
Cheers, I just carefully did it with a dremel sharpened metal one
before reading this and I found it better than a razor. It's the inlet
manifold gasket and quite fiddly getting a razor to the far end.
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Old 09-13-2007, 06:47 AM   #92
dirty_sanchez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrubs
Anyone got any good tips on old gasket removal?
Chisel aerosol gasket remover. This stuff eats old baked-on gaskets like paper, fiber, RTV, and many other materials. Spray it on, let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes, and wipe/lift off the old gasket with a paper towel.

We all have used scrapers of some sort in the past to remove gaskets but we're just making the mating surfaces even worse by the introduction of additional scratches and gouges on the mating surface of the gasket.

It's foolish to make the mating surface even rougher by scraping.

Chisel contains methylene chloride.

It will take the paint off if you're not careful.

You should wear eye protection while using it.

It will burn the crap out of your lip or the back of your hand if the slightest drop touches it.

Bank robbers like it because it eats their fingerprints (I'm joking).

It is a Loctite product.

And now for my usual disclaimer:

I'm ADVrider's very own unofficial official Loctite Factory Rep and I approved this message.

Does anyone know where I can get a bucket of ohm's?

Dirty
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Old 09-13-2007, 10:21 AM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
Chisel contains methylene chloride.

Dirty
First thing is that Methylene Chloride is a WONDERFUL cleaner and I highly recomend the Loctite Chisel 790. It works like magic.

Just a note of caution. I am a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Tech and I use MeCl (Metthylene Chloride) on a daily basis. According to its MSDS sheet it is a know Carsenogen, Tetatagen, & Mutagen. A minimum of a half face respirator w/ a methylene Chloride filter or an OV(organic vapor) filter should be used when ever you are using a Methylene Chloride based product. Where I work we are not even allowed in the process room where MeCl is being used without haveing another person with us.

If you can smell it, you are over-exposed to it.

Again, with the proper PPE, it is a great product.

Robert
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Old 09-13-2007, 10:36 AM   #94
comes naturally
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praetorian
First thing is that Methylene Chloride is a WONDERFUL cleaner and I highly recomend the Loctite Chisel 790. It works like magic.

Just a note of caution. I am a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Tech and I use MeCl (Metthylene Chloride) on a daily basis. According to its MSDS sheet it is a know Carsenogen, Tetatagen, & Mutagen. A minimum of a half face respirator w/ a methylene Chloride filter or an OV(organic vapor) filter should be used when ever you are using a Methylene Chloride based product. Where I work we are not even allowed in the process room where MeCl is being used without haveing another person with us.

If you can smell it, you are over-exposed to it.

Again, with the proper PPE, it is a great product.

Robert
I should know this but...Tetatagen???
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Old 09-13-2007, 10:54 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by comes naturally
I should know this but...Tetatagen???
He probably means teratogen. A substance that causes birth defects, abnormalities, development delays, or death in animal offspring.

Peter
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Old 09-13-2007, 11:24 AM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdoege
He probably means teratogen. A substance that causes birth defects, abnormalities, development delays, or death in animal offspring.

Peter
thankfully, it only causes these defects in kalifornians.
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Old 09-13-2007, 02:53 PM   #97
praetorian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdoege
He probably means teratogen. A substance that causes birth defects, abnormalities, development delays, or death in animal offspring.

Peter
yeah.... what ^ he said...... See.... working with MeCl has already affected my typing abilities......damn computer kicks my butt every time
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Old 09-15-2007, 10:37 PM   #98
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Garage tips

My daughter and I just got back from the dentist. My dentist and I are on a first name basis and saves some of his old dentist tools for me. Some of them come in very handy as o-ring picks. They work great in the tricky spots. 2HE
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Old 09-24-2007, 07:55 PM   #99
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If this has been covered before now, sorry but I don't remember seeing it.

I keep safety glasses, ear muffs, and gloves on or next to the bench with mounted power tools. No excuses not to put on the safety gear before flipping the switch.

Except day before yesterday. I had left two pairs of gloves inside the spare bedroom that's been doubling as a "clean" engine assembly room.

So when I got the bright idea to smooth some grooves off of the outside of a clutch hub for the M900, I lazily started spinning it on a shaft by holding it at a shallow angle to the bench belt sander - without gloves becasue they were in the house.

So when the hub suddenly climbed the shaft to my left hand .... you know where this is going.... A hub that weighs about a pound spinning at about 1000 rpm has a lot of energy. I was lucky that the first spring mount that connected with my little finger right at the last joint didn't make it through the joint or out through the nail. After putting up with the throbbing for 24 hrs, both pairs of gloves went out to the garage on my next trip back out there.

If I'd been wearing the leather gloves that usually stay there for all the bench tools, I would probably just have a purple fingernail at most instead of four deep lacerations and a purple nail and a couple more minor booboos to the back of the hand and the thumb.

Ya'll be safe - keep the safety gear right at the bench.
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Old 09-25-2007, 08:01 PM   #100
dirty_sanchez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305
If this has been covered before now, sorry but I don't remember seeing it.

I keep safety glasses, ear muffs, and gloves on or next to the bench with mounted power tools. No excuses not to put on the safety gear before flipping the switch.

Except day before yesterday. I had left two pairs of gloves inside the spare bedroom that's been doubling as a "clean" engine assembly room.

So when I got the bright idea to smooth some grooves off of the outside of a clutch hub for the M900, I lazily started spinning it on a shaft by holding it at a shallow angle to the bench belt sander - without gloves becasue they were in the house.

So when the hub suddenly climbed the shaft to my left hand .... you know where this is going.... A hub that weighs about a pound spinning at about 1000 rpm has a lot of energy. I was lucky that the first spring mount that connected with my little finger right at the last joint didn't make it through the joint or out through the nail. After putting up with the throbbing for 24 hrs, both pairs of gloves went out to the garage on my next trip back out there.

If I'd been wearing the leather gloves that usually stay there for all the bench tools, I would probably just have a purple fingernail at most instead of four deep lacerations and a purple nail and a couple more minor booboos to the back of the hand and the thumb.

Ya'll be safe - keep the safety gear right at the bench.
Gloves and a bench grinder is the receipe for loosing a finger.

No matter how hot the part gets, this Cat would never use gloves while using a bench grinder.

I've seen a finger get ripped off when a finger inside of a glove got caught between the wheel and the part rest years back.

Dirty
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Old 09-26-2007, 08:14 AM   #101
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Apply a thin coat of copper paste on the thread of every bolt, screw and nut you have on your bike when it´s still new and you´ll always be able to loosen them easily when you want to, they won´t rust fast.
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Old 09-26-2007, 10:06 AM   #102
Gordy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhpr262
Apply a thin coat of copper paste on the thread of every bolt, screw and nut you have on your bike when it´s still new and you´ll always be able to loosen them easily when you want to, they won´t rust fast.

You've never owned a KTM have you?

Same idea, but with Loc-Tite!
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Old 09-26-2007, 11:07 AM   #103
zap2504
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plastic fluid jugs

Great for all sorts of uses. I cut the side/bottom out of a windshield washer fluid jug and use it for a giant flexible scoop - I pour a jar of hardware into it when I'm looking for a bolt/washer/nut/screw and can pour the contents back into the jar when finished. Cut the sides of another jug into large strips so you can put them under tire irons to avoid scratching wheels. Drill a hole in the cap of another jug the same size as the OD of a 1/4" fuel line and use as a gallon aux fuel tank. Cut a rectangular hole in the side of an antifreeze fluid jug as an oil change catch basin (using the original spout to pour the oil into a recycling container).
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:16 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zap2504
Great for all sorts of uses. I cut the side/bottom out of a windshield washer fluid jug and use it for a giant flexible scoop - I pour a jar of hardware into it when I'm looking for a bolt/washer/nut/screw and can pour the contents back into the jar when finished. Cut the sides of another jug into large strips so you can put them under tire irons to avoid scratching wheels. Drill a hole in the cap of another jug the same size as the OD of a 1/4" fuel line and use as a gallon aux fuel tank. Cut a rectangular hole in the side of an antifreeze fluid jug as an oil change catch basin (using the original spout to pour the oil into a recycling container).
My dad is a retired millright that was trained by an old time blacksmithwith. He just showed me these same "jug tricks" the other day!
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:20 PM   #105
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When loosening a bolt that you're sure is getting ready to snap off, have patience and tighten the bolt again and then back it back off a bit and soak with penetrating fluid, you will find yourself gaining ground slowly but surely on every loosening cycle.
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