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Old 09-06-2010, 09:46 PM   #106
zanardi
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Location: Calgary, Canada
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medical info

RoadID.com

you buy a $25 velcro strap bracelet that you wear on your wrist, with your name, birthdate, numbers of next of kin, local police etc you want contacted, blood type, etc, all laser etched so it won't fade.

In the event of a crash and you are unconscious or worse, Emergency crews will check your neck and wrists while assessing you and will see it. Very invaluable piece of kit !

I'm a critical care Paramedic / Firefighter and I don't have any business or personal ties to this product.
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Old 11-02-2010, 12:35 PM   #107
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Carry a Firefighter/EMT with you?

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Old 11-07-2010, 02:05 AM   #108
Migs
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For a "dog tag" type solution that has ALL your medical and contact information I use roadid.com with their interactive data on your tag.

Scanning all your documents is a good idea and you can have them in a dropbox.com account so you don't have to e-mail them to yourself. You could also use evernote.com and have it available online anywhere.

Leaving a trusted person with your itinerary is a good idea, and you need to check in often so that person knows how far along you are.

Cellular phones or sat phones are good ideas to take along with a gps.

Probably the best thing to take along is a buddy that won't leave you out there by yourself. Choose the one that knows how to fix everything.
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Old 11-07-2010, 08:52 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck289
I was wondering how quickly can they determine your blood type. You know, if your knocked out and you don't have it written on a dog tag or something. I want to get a RoadID braclet or somethign similar and want know if blood type is someting worth putting on there.
Keep in mind that laboratory bench-top rapid blood typing methods are only about 90% accurate. That's one of the reasons they still do the specific type and screen when they are going to transfuse someone.
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Old 11-07-2010, 08:54 AM   #110
autolycos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migs
For a "dog tag" type solution that has ALL your medical and contact information I use roadid.com with their interactive data on your tag.

Scanning all your documents is a good idea and you can have them in a dropbox.com account so you don't have to e-mail them to yourself. You could also use evernote.com and have it available online anywhere.

Leaving a trusted person with your itinerary is a good idea, and you need to check in often so that person knows how far along you are.

Cellular phones or sat phones are good ideas to take along with a gps.

Probably the best thing to take along is a buddy that won't leave you out there by yourself. Choose the one that knows how to fix everything.
Best things to put there are significant medical problems and surgeries, as well as allergies to medicines (especially antibiotics, and ESPECIALLY what your reaction is). It's very helpful to know where to find additional hardware and/or missing things. Also, if you have a weird heart condition can be helpful.
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Old 11-21-2010, 10:38 AM   #111
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ICE - no go

[quote=Tail Gunner] (snip) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_case_of_emergency [/quote]

ICE (and a jump drive with info) is a nice idea, but not very practical for several reasons.

Many people have a lock of some sort on their phones.

I'm an EMT and have never been formally trained on this. As someone else pointed out, phones and PDAs are handed over to the police. If you have important medical information to share, it needs to be where someone will see it.

Those tags runners put on their shoes and ankles aren't guaranteed to be found, especially if the owner was knocked out of said shoes.

I've seen riders put emergency info inside or on their helmets. Of course, this was discovered at the hospital, not on the scene or in the ambulance.

We do check for MedicAlert bracelets and necklaces. When I ride, I wear a red dog tag with the EMS symbol on it. I got it on eBay for about $7 (search for custom dog tags - I just checked and they're still making them). It has my ICE info, blood type, restrictions (no MRI, for example), and my organ donor status.

That's what EMS needs to know when they find you in a ditch.

Stuff like DNR requires paperwork and we don't look for that (or care if you have one, to be honest). That's for the ER doc.

Just sayin'.
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Old 11-21-2010, 08:08 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TraumaQueen
Stuff like DNR requires paperwork and we don't look for that (or care if you have one, to be honest). That's for the ER doc.
Just sayin'.
I hope you care about a DNR!
Some states, wallet cards and/or tags are legal proof.

CA, for example-"How can I ensure that the EMT or paramedic responding to my emergency needs will honor my DNR wish?

The best way to ensure that your wishes are honored is to complete the official State Prehospital DNR form and have it signed by your physician and readily accessible when EMS help arrives. If you are concerned about the form being available at all times, you would be well-advised to obtain and wear a MedicAlert bracelet or neck medallion engraved with your DNR requirements."

Personally I see "rescinded" DNR (even from Nursing Homes) patients all the time and it pisses me off! Paperwork and all signed, but a family member is in panic mode (not POA) and tells EMT's to do everything-they do. Then it is stopped in the ER. BS!! If this would have happened to my father, and someone going against his legal and documented wishes, I would be crawling way up someones AHole

Just Sayin..:
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:23 PM   #113
TraumaQueen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dacrazyrn
I hope you care about a DNR!
Some states, wallet cards and/or tags are legal proof.

CA, for example-"How can I ensure that the EMT or paramedic responding to my emergency needs will honor my DNR wish?

The best way to ensure that your wishes are honored is to complete the official State Prehospital DNR form and have it signed by your physician and readily accessible when EMS help arrives. If you are concerned about the form being available at all times, you would be well-advised to obtain and wear a MedicAlert bracelet or neck medallion engraved with your DNR requirements."

Personally I see "rescinded" DNR (even from Nursing Homes) patients all the time and it pisses me off! Paperwork and all signed, but a family member is in panic mode (not POA) and tells EMT's to do everything-they do. Then it is stopped in the ER. BS!! If this would have happened to my father, and someone going against his legal and documented wishes, I would be crawling way up someones AHole

Just Sayin..:
Hey dacrazyrn,

I've only worked in TX and MN, so I am guilty of making a sweeping generalization in my last post. Please forgive me.

I understand what you're saying and don't think I haven't taken up that fight myself -- many times.

What happens, in my experience, is we do exactly what we always do and take them to the hospital, with an advisory to the ER staff if we know there's a DNR. Then they make the decision... if the opportunity presents itself. It's exactly as you describe.

I've done CPR on people with the correct paperwork on their persons. And yes, it made me furious, because they bothered to make sure everything was in order and expected us to follow their instructions.

In any case, all I was trying to say was that you can put "DNR" on your dog tags, but don't expect EMS to necessarily heed it, even if you are carrying your documentation.

I hope you're nearby if I'm ever in a pinch!
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:17 AM   #114
Metallic Waste
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Has anyone seen this yet?

Interesting idea, anyway. I'm wondering how much actual time is saved vs. someone trained in proper post-accident helmet removal. I also wonder if it would pass Snell.
-K
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Old 12-17-2010, 08:08 PM   #115
henrymartin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrxinpa View Post
Couple of thoughts on this one. We just got home from a Weekend Off-Road Rally. We started with 14 riders and had 2 turn around within the first mile. It was way too technical riding for this individual. About another mile in we had another rider suffer mechanical failure and had to turn around and head out of the woods. He opted to go alone without an escort. Now with 11 riders we ended up over 40 miles deep in the woods.

In this case we where incredibly fortunate that No One got hurt. At the lunch stops one of the riders said he almost ran over his own leg on one of the hill/rock inclines. This caused a nice topic for lunch conversation. So How would we deal with a massive trauma 40 miles deep into the woods?

Out of the 11 Riders we only had 2 of us (myself being one) that had any formal Red Cross Training. I'm a certified Emergency Responder and Part Time River Guide and am used to dealing with these type of situations. However the only other qualified person only had Basic First Aid and CPR Training and oh we had an undertaker if that helped!! We had limited Cell Phone reception with Internet Accesss so we could give the authorities our location if needed. I personally always ride with my SPOT so I could activate that but once the 911 system was activated it would still take even the best 4 wheeler running 10mph 4 hours to reach us and another couple hours to evacuate anyone. The Helo Evac would have been nearly impossible because of our location in the forest.

So back to the context of the thread. What to do in an emergency situation? If your riding alone yea an ID is important, however, when riding in a group make sure Someone is carrying a FIRST AID KIT!!!! A CELL PHONE, SPOT/ EPIRB and that someone besides yourself knows how to use them. Filing a Flight Plan is Essential. People should know howmany riders in the group went out for the ride.. How Many Riders Bailed out of the ride and they Made It Back to Base Camp OK!!!.. We let 3 riders leave our group and head out of the woods basicallly alone. If they would have crashed then what?

Better Planning on all our parts will be exercised on our next ride.

Just some thoughts.

Jeff
I ALWAYS carry a small First Aid Kit (one of those Just-In-Case red baggies) that has the bare minimum to stop bleeding, apply pressure, clean a cut, etc. It is either in an unlocked sidecase (on-road) or strapped to the seat (off-road). This is basic stuff. Alone or not, you need more than hands to save yourself or someone. In addition, I always carry spare fuses, spare lightbulb for main light, pump, tire tools/patch (or slime - off-road), zip ties, cellphone, lighter, emergency blanket (foil), bottle of water and a granola bar, flashlight, 100ft of paracord, and basic tools. If alone in the woods, I also bring a walkie-talkie with scan option.

In the car I have all of the above, plus jumper cables, folding shovel, ax, blanket, compass, a sleeping bag, emergency crank radio, and 100ft of climbing rope.
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Old 02-11-2011, 08:50 PM   #116
CWR
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Been riding off road for over 40 years and have never really even thought about dog tags (although I don't ride alone). Just ordered a set, thanks for the advice.
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:23 PM   #117
RISEOFNATIONSFRK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Clarke View Post
I think I would also recommended a BSA (Boy Scouts of America) Handbook. Very good stuff if I remember (some useless stuff like their medals and what have you) how to tie knots and I believe how to create campfires and things (its been along time since I have looked at it), how to read a map (for those who just use a GPS).

http://www.oncesoldtales.com/?record_id=2417810

For only $3.58.

So its cheap.

Also this place has the blankets, flashlights, waterproof matches and MREs :)

http://www.quakekare.com/

RISEOFNATIONSFRK screwed with this post 03-04-2011 at 11:49 PM
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:01 AM   #118
TraumaQueen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR View Post
Been riding off road for over 40 years and have never really even thought about dog tags (although I don't ride alone). Just ordered a set, thanks for the advice.



A skin gun might be in our futures, too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXO_ApjKPaI
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Old 03-25-2011, 08:46 AM   #119
jmcgilroy
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Quick-Clot

A few pages ago someone mentioned this product. The EMT's/paramedics around here are just getting around to testing it. All positive comments, even clots up arterial bleeding. They said that there is a powder and a pad type. They recommended the pads, sealed in a foil packet about $14 each. One guy said that this was the best stuff in trauma medicine to come out in a long time.
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Old 03-29-2011, 03:55 PM   #120
jaycommando
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Quick clot.

We used this stuff in Iraq and afghan. It's the best shit available. It comes in pad form about 3 inches square made from seaweed. what it is used for is major artery bleeds or massive trauma not a nasty cut. because it chemically bonds with all surrounding tissue. should you need to use it you find the gusher open the pad place on the wound and apply alot of pressure (think guy in full armour) then pack the wound and bandage up. Tell the EMT or ER guy that it's in as a surgeon needs to remove it. This stuff is not a toy it is full on life saving equipment. For an easier option I would invest in a CAT or combat application tourniquet. These can be applied one handed around any limb by the victim or injured party.

Ride safe
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