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Old 03-26-2013, 09:23 AM   #1486
Maoule
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Quote:
Originally Posted by absoluteclint View Post
Excellent advice... Thanks! I think I'll be making a trip to the local Sears (most of my tools are Craftsman) to look into a sliding T-Bar. You're right the sliding option makes more sense... By removing the extensions for storage it becomes just as compact as the folding T-Bar without losing the tool's strength/integrity.

I think in the past I have seen ratcheting thumbwheels that fit onto sliding T-bars... I can't seem to find a product that fits that description now. I can find thumbwheels but none that are made to fit onto a sliding T-Bar... Anyone know of such a product? Have a link?

Thanks!
It's a POS, but try harbor freight. Oh wait, that was an oxymoron!!
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:36 PM   #1487
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Originally Posted by japako View Post
I made one of the stands shown in a previous post, and taped the blade to that. The stand, spoons with axle wrench, and tube repair kit all are inside a tool tube.
This works well and keeps it out of the way.
Actually duct taped to a tire iron will work perfectly. Thank you.
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:48 PM   #1488
team ftb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by absoluteclint View Post
Excellent advice... Thanks! I think I'll be making a trip to the local Sears (most of my tools are Craftsman) to look into a sliding T-Bar. You're right the sliding option makes more sense... By removing the extensions for storage it becomes just as compact as the folding T-Bar without losing the tool's strength/integrity.

Thanks!
I used a sliding T handle + 6" extension for years and worked wonders. Then I changed over to a one of these (2nd tool in from the left) instead of the sliding T-handle. Again no issues.




It was a bit more convenient that the sliding T-handle but not a deal breaker.

To go even more minimal for the last year I've been using the Motion Pro Metric Tool above. It replaces all these tools in the tool kit and packs smaller. I liked that aspect. However look for my post here ( http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=17781723&postcount=1312 ) about the MP tool driver failing in the field and needing to be welded. Something I would do before trusting it.
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Old 03-27-2013, 06:43 AM   #1489
absoluteclint
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Thanks team ftb...

I'm in the process of building my tool kit. Last week I ordered Craftsman 1/4 and 3/8 in. sliding t-bars (local Sears didn't have them in stock). I'll only carry one but went ahead and bought both... Cheap to order both at same time. I'm also sorting through all appropriate sockets and extensions to get it down to the minumum of what's needed for my bike.

Other things I've recently picked up:
-Stockton Tire Iron
-Endurostar Trail Stand
-Spare Tubes (I like the tip of packing them in ziplock bags with baby powder)

I plan to purchase:
-Motion Pro T-6 Tire Lever
-Mini Air Compressor (for now I'm using my mtn bike's mini pump... Topeak Pocket Rocket Master Blaster)
-Leatherman (Yes... Somehow I have made it this far in life as a man without a real Leatherman!!)
-XRL spark plug socket

Alot of the other items/tools in my kit are things I already have or are really cheap to purchase and have been mentioned over and over in this thread. Speaking of... this is an excellent thread... Thanks to the OP for creating it!


absoluteclint screwed with this post 03-27-2013 at 06:56 AM
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Old 03-31-2013, 10:51 PM   #1490
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Oh, but what fits?

Does any one know of a resource that will tell you what fasteners are actually on your vehicle so you know specifically what tools to carry? It's not in any of the workshop manuals I've seen for my SV650, for instance. The result is a very bulky toolkit on the premise that you made just need that something. I would love to pare it down ...
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:10 PM   #1491
marchyman
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Spend an hour or two in your garage with your bike. Look at it. What might break or get tweaked if the bike falls down? What fasteners will you need to get at to fix the parts likely to get broken? How many zip ties, bits of wire, electrical tape, etc., might you need to get back on the road. You don't need to bring the stuff to do a major service because that shouldn't be your goal. Or do you plan on servicing your bike trail side?

Tools to handle wheels, mirrors, handlebars, controls, pegs and a tire/tube repair kit are what you need. That plus some basic things like a multi-tool. Fancy repairs can wait.

Cable ties, and some basic tools turned this:



into this (and got the owner home -- 500 miles away).





Nothing fancy in the way of tools needed.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:23 AM   #1492
beechum1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notrivia View Post
Does any one know of a resource that will tell you what fasteners are actually on your vehicle so you know specifically what tools to carry? It's not in any of the workshop manuals I've seen for my SV650, for instance. The result is a very bulky toolkit on the premise that you made just need that something. I would love to pare it down ...
Go into the garage and start breaking the bike down. Two reasons: You'll find out what tools fit, and in the field won't be the first time you're doing it. Basic tools for that bike are going to be (i think) a #2 phillips for the fairings, a 26mm for the rear axle nut, 8,10,12,14 mm sockets and rachet, a co2 pump or hand pump, tire patch kit (the slimy snake kind).

I had purchased a set of vortex knock off rearsets for my carbed sv, and a fall in a parking lot (shoestring got caught honest) broke it. If I hadn't had my 4mm zip ties I wouldn't have been able to change gears on the bike to get home.

The getting into the garage and working on the bike, is going to be your best guide for what tools you want. In my case, I've had my XR apart so many times that I've decided to go with QD's at any point I can. On my 600RR I installed clevis pins:

with spring pins:


on the seat so I didnt' have to use tools to get it off.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:24 AM   #1493
notrivia
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Oh, That Really Hurts!

Thanks goodness you got your R100rs together. But what a tragic thing to see...
I actually do carry duct tape, electrical tape, a special high-tenacity
tape, multiple zip-ties, safety wire, those metal collars you can tighten- (I can never remember their technical name, duh!), and three different compound solutions to fix metal, lock-tight, silicon seal, grease, plus wheel bearings, brake pads, spare clutch and throttle cables, clutch and brake levers, fuses, electrical wire, bulbs, those tubes you melt around electrical wire ... (huh, let me breathe...) all under the seat of my SV650.

So I hope I am responsibly prepared to repair anything that can be termed an "emergency fix".

My quandary is not knowing specifically all the fasteners on my bike. Without a list, you virtually have to take it apart to know, and following the premise of "If it ain'nt broke don't fix it" I'm not about to do that. With an appropriate list, I could reduce my tool-kit to the essentials. Right now I have both a socket and a wrench for everything I know of. It fills to the brim one of those humongous Roadgear tool bags.

Of course, my bike has never broken down in 60,000 miles, following the adage that what you prepare for won't happen to you. So I usually end up embarrassing myself at the side of the road trying to figure out how to use what I have to solve other people's problems since I am no "Bright Light" when it comes to anything mechanical.
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Old 04-01-2013, 01:59 PM   #1494
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So, you go to an online parts catalog - like procaliber, select a page that you're interested in, and copy-paste into a text file, and gradually build up the list.
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Old 04-01-2013, 04:41 PM   #1495
marchyman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notrivia View Post
Thanks goodness you got your R100rs together. But what a tragic thing to see...
It wasn't mine. I was a source of cable ties. It took the emergency cable tie supply from three bikes to sew that fairing back together enough to make it road worthy. I'm now looking at adding one of these [amazon link] to my kit. Maybe.

And yeah, you have to take it apart to know what fasteners need what tools. But as beechum1 said: in the field won't be the first time you're doing it
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Old 04-01-2013, 04:51 PM   #1496
HaChayalBoded
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
It wasn't mine. I was a source of cable ties. It took the emergency cable tie supply from three bikes to sew that fairing back together enough to make it road worthy. I'm now looking at adding one of these [amazon link] to my kit. Maybe.

And yeah, you have to take it apart to know what fasteners need what tools. But as beechum1 said: in the field won't be the first time you're doing it
That clamptite thingy looks slick, is there much of a difference between that and say a pair of safety wire pliers?
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Old 04-01-2013, 06:29 PM   #1497
marchyman
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The clamptite puts equal pressure on all 2 or 4 strands. At least that's what their marketing says. There are plenty of youtube videos showing its use. Of course they all show it using the $69 version, not the $29 version

It's still a "maybe" on my wish list.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:34 PM   #1498
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i have been a clamptite user for about 16 yrs now.. i have what would be the $29 version. i think it was $14 back then, anyway i like it and it works.
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:37 PM   #1499
dddd
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ditch problem

Hi,

Here is a rather specific problem for I would like you guys to suggest out of the box ideas...

You are alone (likely for hours), no buddy with you, nor vehicle passing by to help or serve as an anchor, and you are not so desperate yet as to hit your spot tracker 'help' button...

Your bike is in a ditch on the side of the road, steep enough that you can't ride it up.

There is no road sign pole, no guard rail pillar, no trees near the road i.e. nothing to tie a rope and pulley system to drag your bike (although you may have carried such equipment).

How do you get it back up to the road?

Thanks!


PS: Don't think this is a rare setup; road sides are usually clear of trees and enclosed between muddy trenches, as you well know. So, I'm thinking about some anchor (or many anchors to spread the force) to nail in the ground, but I can't imagine carrying so much weight, hammer and all...
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:54 PM   #1500
DaymienRules
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just like winching in the dunes. dig a hole, tie your line to the heaviest thing you can find, then bury it. instant anchor. or just start taking the bike apart and carry back to the road piece by piece. you said hours right?
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