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Old 07-17-2014, 11:10 AM   #1
Mastery OP
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Question about seeking dual citizenship for RTW adventures

As most people know, Americans are despised throughout the world and become the first target when there is a selection to pick from.

For those of you on these RTW trips, are you carrying a different passport? If so, without getting dual citizenship by birth rights...what country makes it easy to achieve dual citizenship without requiring you to terminate your US citizenship permanently?
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Old 07-17-2014, 11:24 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Mastery View Post
As most people know, Americans are despised throughout the world and become the first target when there is a selection to pick from.
This is entirely not true. The US passport is considered one of the best passports to have for international travel, second only to certain European nations.

The idea that Americans are universally despised is a myth. There are exceptions, sure, but then again, if you're wandering around Taliban-controlled areas of Afghanistan, you probably are getting what you deserve.

If you're seeking dual citizenship only for this reason, you need to reconsider your priorities.
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Old 07-17-2014, 11:26 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by E-Bum View Post
This is entirely not true. The US passport is considered one of the best passports to have for international travel, second only to certain European nations.

The idea that Americans are universally despised is a myth. There are exceptions, sure, but then again, if you're wandering around Taliban-controlled areas of Afghanistan, you probably are getting what you deserve.

If you're seeking dual citizenship only for this reason, you need to reconsider your priorities.
Ok, let me rephrase: In the event a American was going into a country in which Americans are looked at more unfavorably than a person from another country, what are the possibilities?

I'm not talking about having a US passport is a bad passport. I'm talking about having somebody else figure out you are an American from your held passport and using your nationality against you. There are many places outside of Taliban controlled areas in which US citizens are more despised than other nationalities.
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Old 07-17-2014, 12:07 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Mastery View Post
Ok, let me rephrase: In the event a American was going into a country in which Americans are looked at more unfavorably than a person from another country, what are the possibilities?

I'm not talking about having a US passport is a bad passport. I'm talking about having somebody else figure out you are an American from your held passport and using your nationality against you. There are many places outside of Taliban controlled areas in which US citizens are more despised than other nationalities.
The fact is that 99% of people (probably over that) in this world couldn't care less where you are from. In small and undeveloped nations, they couldn't give two shits about your far away country. Their day-to-day life is hard enough that they don't have time for that. In developed nations, the vast majority of the population knows better than to assume this one lone traveler personifies all the negatives associated with his nation's activities, ideologies and political beliefs. So again, you're left with these minority pockets of radical shit-for-brains citizens who would hate a Belgian as much as an Aboriginee as much as an American.

If you happen to come across the miniscule percentage of the people in this world who do hold grudges against America, you're likely no better off with any other passport, as these are extremists suspicious of any and all kind of foreigners in their countries. For example: In Bolivia, a country notoriously anti-US, you are much better off with a US passport than, say, a Peruvian passport, with which you're going to get hassled to no end.

A much more useful strategy would be one which sees you work on yourself. Always carry a smile, always be respectful, always be polite and never outstay your welcome. Be patient, be grateful of your hosts and project the image you wish your future compatriots be compared to. Brush up on some local history, culture and language to show locals you've made an effort to get to know them and they will return the favor. And where are you going to be flashing around your passport aside from border crossings or traffic stops anyway?

Edit: Hopefully I don't come off as a pie-in-the sky hippy with an attitude. What I'm really trying to get across is that, from my somewhat extensive travels, Americans have no more to worry about than other foreign passport holders. You'd be going through A LOT of trouble for little to no benefit. Use reason, of course, and don't go skipping through known conflict areas and all will be well.

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Old 07-17-2014, 03:32 PM   #5
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I have met Americans in many parts of the world and have never heard one say that they have been harassed or had trouble as a result of being one, you are not as disliked as individuals as you might think you are. The US passport is not the best, you either cannot get or have a problem getting visas for some countries and often pay more than other nationalities, we Brits often get similar treatment although ours will get us into such places as Iran and Sudan.
If you still feel you want to get dual citizenship by birth right that depends on where your parents or grand parents come from, none of us can answer that.
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Old 07-17-2014, 08:15 PM   #6
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Canada allows dual-citizenship.

My wife and I are currently traveling on a Canadian passport, but might use our UK and Croatian passports in Europe. Shorter and quicker lineups at the border as we duck in and out of the Eurozone.
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Old 07-18-2014, 02:07 AM   #7
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Hey man, if your a good American, it's better than an bad German, French, Irish etc.
Be nice, smile a lot, give small gifts, speak softly, respect culture.
A dual passport does not excuse asshats.
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Old 07-20-2014, 04:27 PM   #8
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Only people that will likely see your passport are the border crossing officials and hotel people. Otherwise everyone will guess American anyway by your accent, mannerisms, clothing etc.
Be polite, be respectful. Bottom line behave according to local rules/customs and don't be an arsehole and you'll be just fine regardless of the color of your passport.
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Old 07-20-2014, 07:54 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by wheatwhacker View Post
Hey man, if your a good American, it's better than an bad German, French, Irish etc.
Be nice, smile a lot, give small gifts, speak softly, respect culture.
A dual passport does not excuse asshats.



I haven't been to as many countries as I'd like, but one thing that i've learned is that most people like Americans. If they have any dislike, it's about the American government and global policies. But unlike here, others can often separate their opinions on the government from the people.

I watch a lot of travel shows, and one of the major ones (Anthony Bourdain?) was in pre-war Syria. He was quite surprised on how friendly everyone was to their crew, and genuinely interested in making a good impression; welcoming them into their cafes and homes. When asked about the popular hatred against the US, the Syrians made it pretty clear that was about the government, not our people. I've heard they same story about Iranians as well.

I think you get this a lot from countries that don't have that much say about their ruling government.

note that a lot of cultures, especially in remote harsh climates, have very strong traditions on welcoming travelers. I think it has to do with the pre-technology days where travelers were the only source of news and trade. I've heard this is one of the most amazing aspects of visiting Eastern Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Mongolia, etc. A lot of remote African villages also have this tradition.
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:09 PM   #10
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Being from the UK but living in New Zealand i get my NZ passport sooon with dual nationality which gives me the benefit to travel in and out of Australia freely next year for a bike trip im planning, also gives me easier border crossings in Europe and down here but i think you have to use the same passport you left on entering the next destination but again not sure.

Other than that tangible benefit not sure i would bother and the UK government is in the US pocket so perceived similarly, as most have said its more about your attitude to others rather than where your from.

Other benefit i thought of would be if you had to surrender your passport to a hotel or the police and you really needed to leave in a hurry you would still have a passport left over, but im sure there are other consequences im not aware of that others will chime in about.

If you really really wanted a second passport and had the money which would fund another bike trip you could check which countries are allowed as dual US citizenship then pick the easiest one.

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Old 08-09-2014, 08:26 AM   #11
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I found this on the state department website.

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Dual Nationality

Section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) states that “the term ‘national of the United States’ means (A) a citizen of the United States, or (B) a person who, though not a citizen of the United States, owes permanent allegiance to the United States.” Therefore, U.S. citizens are also U.S. nationals. Non-citizen nationality status refers only individuals who were born either in American Samoa or on Swains Island to parents who are not citizens of the United States. The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a national of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own nationality laws based on its own policy. Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. national parents may be both a U.S. national and a national of the country of birth.

A U.S. national may acquire foreign nationality by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. national may not lose the nationality of the country of birth. U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another nationality does not risk losing U.S. nationality. However, a person who acquires a foreign nationality by applying for it may lose U.S. nationality. In order to lose U.S. nationality, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign nationality voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. nationality.

The way this is written I would be very careful. I am a dual citizen of Canada and the US. When my parents moved back to the US they had to prove that they had not voted in Canada, otherwise they would have forfeited US citizenship... That was almost fifty years ago things may have changed, but I would forget this idea. Like others have said behave well, and you will be treated as a visitor, not a government.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:22 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by usgser View Post
Only people that will likely see your passport are the border crossing officials and hotel people. Otherwise everyone will guess American anyway by your accent, mannerisms, clothing etc.
Be polite, be respectful. Bottom line behave according to local rules/customs and don't be an arsehole and you'll be just fine regardless of the color of your passport.
+1

FWIW the hardest country to get into as a UK national was the USA. Saudi, Russia, Israel - all easy. The US....a pain in the arse...this was using a land crossing as opposed to flying in.

You're over-thinking the problem IMO, Stick with the US passport - you're gonna want to call your consulate in the event of an issue and do you really want to explain why you crossed in on a NY (for example) passport?

Keep it simple.
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Old 08-10-2014, 08:18 AM   #13
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other than reciprocal bumps in visa fees I haven't run into any anti- American baloney.
Mind ya I'll probably get denied a visa to Iran, where I'd actually like to visit.

Sad how geopolitical fukwitery has made the world a much more dangerous place.
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Old 08-11-2014, 10:13 AM   #14
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There is an expression where I'm from (not where I am), that you get hit in the face, not in your passport. Aside from border control agents, you hardly ever go around flaunting your passport.

You will get treated according to how you act, how you present yourself, and so on. The passport just determines how easily you will cross the borders, and which borders you intend to cross will determine which passport will be more favourable.
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