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Old 12-01-2008, 05:06 PM   #136
datchew
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So, is 567PST supposed to solidify... ever?

It certainly works on petcock threads for airheads to prevent leaks. But on pretty much all the fasteners i've used it on, it doesn't seem to ever solidify. Still gooey and sticky after weeks.
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Old 12-02-2008, 05:19 AM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
So, is 567PST supposed to solidify... ever?

It certainly works on petcock threads for airheads to prevent leaks. But on pretty much all the fasteners i've used it on, it doesn't seem to ever solidify. Still gooey and sticky after weeks.
Only the area sandwiched between the male and female threads cures-and gets an instant seal of around 500 to 600psi. If you're seeing the squeezeout and thinking that the stuff hasn't cured, it never will.

The squeezeout is missing one of the ingredients that forces the cure which is lack of air. The other ingredient that is needed to make anaerobic chemistries cure is active metal ions.

Dirty
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Old 12-02-2008, 06:06 AM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
Only the area sandwiched between the male and female threads cures-and gets an instant seal of around 500 to 600psi. If you're seeing the squeezeout and thinking that the stuff hasn't cured, it never will.

The squeezeout is missing one of the ingredients that forces the cure which is lack of air. The other ingredient that is needed to make anaerobic chemistries cure is active metal ions.

Dirty
So, if I screwed a M6x16 stainless screw into a mating piece of carbon steel tapped to fit (frame) and had it in there for 3 weeks and then removed it, shouldn't the area not exposed to outside air be solidified? I guess maybe I'm looking too much into this.

The stuff IS preventing gasoline ooze on 2 sets of petcock threads on 2 different bikes. This is a
But it doesn't seem to be giving any type of resistance to loosening the fasteners that I use it on, i.e., no resistance to removal torque.

If you'll recall, I got this specifically for the petcock threads to prevent weepage, but I was hoping to use it for other fasteners as well. Maybe I just need to buy a bottle of blue as well, huh?
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:09 AM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
I suggest a wicking grade-super low viscosity threadlocker for electrical terminals in junction boxes, but I need to know exactly what you're trying to prevent from happening.

Loose electrical terminals run hotter, pull more amps, waste electricity, and shorten equipment lifespan.

Any of the threadlockers would be fine to use-afterall, they're just filling in the airgap between the male and female threads. That air gap doesn't conduct electricity and neither does a threadlocker. But a T/L will ensure an electrical terminal has it's clamp load maintained.

We have all sorts of conductive and non conductive products.

What is it that you're trying to do? Prevent fastener loosening? Prevent spade terminals from jiggling around?

Dirty
Nothing in particular, just curious if Loctite made an electrically conductive thread locker. Just one of those 'I wonder...' questions. Thanks for letting me know they do. If I ever come up for a need for it, I'll be sure to ask here.

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Old 12-02-2008, 05:02 PM   #140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
So, if I screwed a M6x16 stainless screw into a mating piece of carbon steel tapped to fit (frame) and had it in there for 3 weeks and then removed it, shouldn't the area not exposed to outside air be solidified? I guess maybe I'm looking too much into this.

The stuff IS preventing gasoline ooze on 2 sets of petcock threads on 2 different bikes. This is a
But it doesn't seem to be giving any type of resistance to loosening the fasteners that I use it on, i.e., no resistance to removal torque.

If you'll recall, I got this specifically for the petcock threads to prevent weepage, but I was hoping to use it for other fasteners as well. Maybe I just need to buy a bottle of blue as well, huh?

Datchew- As far as the assembled male and female threads on the petcock not having much breakloose torque, make sure you're putting a ribbon two threads back from the end of the male threads all the way around the entire depth of the threaded engagement. Once assembled, you'll see a thin uniform band of squeezeout on the leading edge of the female fitting...and it'll never cure.

567, 561, 565 all are anaerobic threadsealants with teflon all of which allow loosening with hand tools. It's very unusual to have the sort of breakloose torque you mentioned

Turbo- We have all sorts of products for PCB's. PM me if you ever have a project in mind and I'll get you in touch with one of the electronics guys if there's nothing in my bag of tricks from the industrial side that'll work.

Dirty
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Old 12-02-2008, 06:09 PM   #141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez

567, 561, 565 all are anaerobic threadsealants with teflon all of which allow loosening with hand tools. It's very unusual to have the sort of breakloose torque you mentioned
Just make it easy for me. Is this stuff supposed to behave like the blue stuff?
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Old 12-02-2008, 06:12 PM   #142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
Just make it easy for me. Is this stuff supposed to behave like the blue stuff?
Yep.

Dirty
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Old 12-02-2008, 07:12 PM   #143
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This thread is kinda like being at a Locktite seminar
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Old 01-09-2009, 03:13 PM   #144
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loctite on electrical connections

Has anyone used loctite 222 or 243 on a spade electrical connection?

What about on car battery terminals? Coat the terminal with loctite 222 just before you put it togther to help cut down on the corrision? It sounds a little wacky but it might work.
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Old 01-09-2009, 04:45 PM   #145
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd83-900t
Has anyone used loctite 222 or 243 on a spade electrical connection?

What about on car battery terminals? Coat the terminal with loctite 222 just before you put it togther to help cut down on the corrision? It sounds a little wacky but it might work.
Bingo!! But.......

Even though 222 is the low strength threadlocker suited for small set screws, eyeglass screws, etc. it's holding power if you put it on the top posts of a battery might be too much for bare fingers to remove, but a small pair of pliers would be ace, but I would feel comfortable about using it though.

An even better suggestion though would be to use a proper di-electric grease.

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Old 01-12-2009, 09:51 PM   #146
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Oil Sealing

I am fitting one of these (http://www.motoren-israel.com/Einbau.../117002_en.pdf) on my bike. If you look in the picture at the link posted, you see on the top of the adapter a large round adapter with an o-ring that fits into a recess in the engine block. Here is a picture of the block recess.



This has engine oil pressure behind it. It appears the o-ring is supposed to seal the pressure. Is there a sealant that might assist in the sealing when fitting this?

irony
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Old 01-14-2009, 05:59 PM   #147
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For God's sake, let's not overlook Loctite #222, purple Low Strength threadloacker, perfect for screws under 1/4" and stuff that only wants a little help. Keeps screw heads from being chewed up etc.
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Old 01-14-2009, 06:02 PM   #148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
So, if I screwed a M6x16 stainless screw into a mating piece of carbon steel tapped to fit (frame) and had it in there for 3 weeks and then removed it, shouldn't the area not exposed to outside air be solidified? I guess maybe I'm looking too much into this.

The stuff IS preventing gasoline ooze on 2 sets of petcock threads on 2 different bikes. This is a
But it doesn't seem to be giving any type of resistance to loosening the fasteners that I use it on, i.e., no resistance to removal torque.

If you'll recall, I got this specifically for the petcock threads to prevent weepage, but I was hoping to use it for other fasteners as well. Maybe I just need to buy a bottle of blue as well, huh?
These threadlockers do not work on stainless steel, they rely on a corrosive effect to hook up. Not my theory, Loctite's facts. Had my boat stuff rattle apart with #242 applied....
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Old 01-14-2009, 06:55 PM   #149
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Irony- anaerobics are what pays the bills in the world of Loctite, but in this case I'm afeared of suggesting a Gasket Eliminator, a Retaining Compound, a Thread Sealant, or a Threadlocker which are all anaerobic chemistries which cure in the absence of air while in contact with active metals (metals that rust, tarnish, corrode, or hold a magnet).

Corrosion mentioned in the post above this does not facilitate a cure of any of Loctite's anaerobic chemistries-never has, and never will.

Looking at the way the part mates to the bottom of the engine case, you'd definately break something on disassembly if you mated the parts with a gasket eliminator or the like, soooooo an oxime cure RTV (one that does NOT have that strong vinegar smell which also outgasses corrosion causing acetoxy vapors) is what I would suggest.

Either Loctite's Instant Gasket or 598 Silicone RTV both are extremely oil resistant and will not break down in the presence of oils, and fuels (aka Non-Polar Solvents) or Ethylene Glycol, Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol (aka Polar Solvents) would be one of the two products I would use if this was my project. Either of these products are good for 500F continuous, so you'd be fine as far as the temperature goes.

Now, how to apply a bead of the stuff..
Spray down everything with a good residue-free contact cleaner, let evaporate.
Apply a bead of the RTV of your choosing in the female portion of this assembly all the way in the bottom of the cylinder and smear/flatten the bead to get it roughly 1/4" to 3/8" up the sides. Mate the parts but don't piddle around because just like the solvent based Honda/Yammabond gasket sealant RTV's will skin over faster than most folks like. You're dealing with a matter of 10 minutes of open time so plan your job, plan your reassy, and work carefully with vim and vigor.

Don't go bananas with a heavy bead because you have to be aware of the squeezeout that will build up on the leading edge of the male cylinder. Can it get into something that will kill your engine?

Hopefully we're clear as mud now, because I am ADVriders very own mildly irreverant yet unofficial real live Loctite factory rep. Now I must add my usual disclaimer- I'm a virgo, into shiney things, in touch with my hair care products, my little pony, and a band called Motorhead.


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dirty_sanchez screwed with this post 01-14-2009 at 07:05 PM
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:37 PM   #150
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Hey Dirty, does Loctite have anything equivalent to Hylomar universal blue?

// marc
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