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Old 12-15-2011, 12:44 PM   #406
NordieBoy
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Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez View Post
Anyway, here's a short clip of me helping outfit a fellow global traveller. Click away if you want a good chuckle:
You're taller when you type than on vid.
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Old 12-15-2011, 01:21 PM   #407
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You're taller when you type than on vid.
Come on Man- I told you it was a "SHORT CLIP"

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Old 12-15-2011, 04:23 PM   #408
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Without watching the clip, I'm going to assume you loctite'd the tire on the rim.
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Old 12-15-2011, 04:34 PM   #409
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If I ride to LA can u get me some of that cool swag??

Seriously, nice of you to be an ADVR goodwill ambasador.
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Old 12-15-2011, 05:08 PM   #410
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If I ride to LA can u get me some of that cool swag??

Seriously, nice of you to be an ADVR goodwill ambasador.
Sure Bob, if you get within a mile from my humble abode and I hear you're coming, I'll offer you a Pabst Blue Ribbon...and some Loctite Swag.

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Old 12-15-2011, 06:02 PM   #411
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Without watching the clip, I'm going to assume you loctite'd the tire on the rim.
For bonus points, which model Loctite?
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:27 AM   #412
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Why isn't Loctite 7090 available in the UK?
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Old 01-06-2012, 08:04 AM   #413
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Why isn't Loctite 7090 available in the UK?
Because you limey bastards caved in and adapted the metric system....and you drive on the wrong side of the road.

Liken it to what we call "Tough Love" here in the States.

Kidding aside, I'm not sure but will check on the UK's equiv. replacement product and let you know.

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Old 01-06-2012, 08:20 AM   #414
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Why isn't Loctite 7090 available in the UK?
Not sure why you can't find it in the UK even though the master catalog shows it to be a global product, but 7090 is a solventless anaerobic primer for use with all anaerobic products like threadlockers, threadsealants, gasket eliminators, and retaining compounds.

Anaerobic primers are used to activate inactive metal surfaces in order to force the anaerobic chemistry to cure on non-ferrous/inactive metal surfaces. Sometimes anaerobic primers such as 7090 are used to speed the cure of anaerobic products.

If you can't find 7090 over there look for something called 7649 PrimerN, which is a solvent-based anaerobic primer.

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Old 01-06-2012, 10:48 AM   #415
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I'm not over there. I just was researching for someone and found I couldn't find it.
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Old 01-21-2012, 04:10 AM   #416
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Is 277 oil resistant? 1-1/2-12 threads, chased with a die and douched with brake-kleen, all i had on hand was 271.

No visible traces of any prior application of thread lock, all steel segmented locknut rattled down.
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Old 01-21-2012, 06:23 AM   #417
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Is 277 oil resistant? 1-1/2-12 threads, chased with a die and douched with brake-kleen, all i had on hand was 271.

No visible traces of any prior application of thread lock, all steel segmented locknut rattled down.
Kat- Once any of the threadlockers are cured, they are fully oil resistant. If you can wait 16 to 24 hours before putting oil on the widget, you'll be ace. You should take care to make a good faith effort to clean/degrease/let dry the offending parts.

277 and 271 are pretty darned strong products so please be duly warned that years down the road if or when disassembly is required, localized heat in the way of a blow torch to heat the parts up very may be required to soften the product to allow you to remove the parts. Beware.

Only a few of the newer threadlockers and retaining compounds are oil-tolerant. Translated-they work as advertised on lightly oily, aka "as-received" parts. Here, we're talking 243, 263 (Med and High Strength Threadlockers) and 603-for mounting bearings with up to a 0.005" gap.

The coffee's finally working-

I'm outta here

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Old 01-21-2012, 08:53 AM   #418
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Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez View Post
277 and 271 are pretty darned strong products so please be duly warned that years down the road if or when disassembly is required, localized heat in the way of a blow torch to heat the parts up very may be required to soften the product to allow you to remove the parts. Beware.
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Old 01-27-2012, 04:35 AM   #419
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I am still waiting for a call from a Henkel/Loctite field application engineer, but in the meantime the advice from dirty_sanchez served me well before so I thought I could ask another sticky stuff question here even though it is not really motorcycle related.

During working hours I design electronics. Also for industrial, marine and railway applications. This means that sometimes heavy or tall components on the circuit borards need additional fixing to withstand vibration and shock.

Production often uses hotmelts to do this. Easy to apply, quick to apply, ready for further handling in minutes. But I am not satisfied with the performance the hotmelts give me, especially not in the long run. Sometimes they last a week, sometimes a month, sometimes a year or two, but in the end they all seem to come loose.

For personal, bike-related stuff I often use a modified silicone polymer glue from the hardware store. Except for the time it takes to fully cure that stuff works perfectly, and I can hardly think of a more electronics-unfriendly environment than a motorcycle ridden offroad. Adhesion on the glass/epoxy base material and most engineering plastics is excellent and stays excellent even after a few years, it handles both low and high temperatures well, and it hardens to a fairly stiff rubbery substance that has some vibration dampening properties.

Now, I cannot use this stuff professionally since the brand name is associated with do-it-yourself which makes the stuff 'not professional', and there is no decent datasheet which makes it even more 'not professional'.

Now, Loctite is a professional brand name with a good reputation. So, I am looking for sticky stuff that does:
- Secure electronics components such as transformers, electrolytic capacitors, etc. to the printed circuit board to improve vibration and shock resistance.
- Wide operating temperature range (at least -25C/-13F .. +70C/158F) in cured state.
- Good, lasting adhesion on regular FR4 glass/epoxy PCB material.
- Good to fair adhesion on engineering plastics like PA6 and PBT.
- Good to fair adhesion on metals like stainless steels, aluminium.
- Single component glue suitable for application by hand using fairly lowcost tooling (eases acceptance).
- Available in smaller quantities such as 310ml/10oz cartridges or even smaller.
- Room temperature or UV-cure.
- Preferrably fairly operator-friendly. Thus not too smelly, fairly easy to create a good bond.
- Some resistance to a less than a perfectly cleaned surface would be nice.
- Full cure time is not very important, but the time it takes before the product can be carfully handled or packaged is.
- Cost is not really a problem unless it is prohibitive. I'd rather use more expensive stuff that works than cheaper stuff that doesn't.

Can you recommend me anything?
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Old 01-27-2012, 12:31 PM   #420
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Originally Posted by DaBit View Post
For personal, bike-related stuff I often use a modified silicone polymer glue from the hardware store. Except for the time it takes to fully cure that stuff works perfectly, and I can hardly think of a more electronics-unfriendly environment than a motorcycle ridden offroad. Adhesion on the glass/epoxy base material and most engineering plastics is excellent and stays excellent even after a few years, it handles both low and high temperatures well, and it hardens to a fairly stiff rubbery substance that has some vibration dampening properties.

Now, I cannot use this stuff professionally since the brand name is associated with do-it-yourself which makes the stuff 'not professional', and there is no decent datasheet which makes it even more 'not professional'.

Can you recommend me anything?

Can you tell us do-it-yourselfers what this magic, non-professional, fairly stiff rubbery goo is, for those of us that don't care what upper level management thinks is too un-famous to use, even though it's perfect for the application?
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