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Old 03-25-2014, 04:25 AM   #661
dirty_sanchez
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Originally Posted by RFVC600R View Post
So you can Loctite some things instead of welding them? That's fucking cool!
Yup. It depends ALOT on the joint design, but yes, in many applications bonding can be as strong as welding.

Wacky stuff I tell you!

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Old 03-30-2014, 08:25 AM   #662
todd83-900t
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Marine anti-seize or grease?

Dirty,

What do you put on your suspension linkage bolts and main swing arm bolt to prevent corrosion. I've tried BelRay water proof grease, grease mixed with molypaste and bacon grease. Over the years I've found that if I don't service the suspension every year or so I'll end up with corroded bolts. The bearings are sealed from water but the bolts aren't and most of the grease is wiped off when you assemble the suspension. I'll give Marine anti-seize a try, but I'm tempted to try some type of wax.

What say the Benevolent Loctite Overlord?
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Old 03-30-2014, 09:04 AM   #663
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Todd-on something like threaded linkage bolts I'd use a blue removable threadlocker.

Anti-Seize is nothing more than a combination of grit/metal dust/graphite/molybdynum and grease-properly used in high heat applications on a bike on spark plug threads, exhaust header studs, etc.

On linkage bolts, I'd use a blue threadlocker which is easily removed with hand tools on the threads. You already mentioned the linkage fasteners have shown corrosion even after you use an anti-seize on them. A threadlocker in a liquid or stick form completely fills that 70% airgap found in between male and female threads and cures to a hard thermoset plastic which reliably keeps moisture out of the threads, and if we can keep all moisture out of that airspace, we've eliminated rustlock.

If you haven't already-go to page one on this thread, get your favorite Sunday Morning beverage and start reading.

Glad you jumped in with a question. The thread has sorta been quiet for the last few weeks.

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Old 03-30-2014, 09:11 AM   #664
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Todd-on something like threaded linkage bolts I'd use a blue removable threadlocker.

Anti-Seize is nothing more than a combination of grit/metal dust/graphite/molybdynum and grease-properly used in high heat applications or applications where critical torque values are needed to achieve specific clamploads-this is a whole different topic of discussion because we'd be testing different thread finishes, coatings, lubricity factors (aka "K factor").

Places I use anti-seize on my bikes are: spark plug threads, exhaust header studs, front and rear axle nuts, counter shaft nut, chain tension bolts on the swingarm, etc.

On linkage bolts, I'd use a blue threadlocker which is easily removed with hand tools on the threads. You already mentioned the linkage fasteners have shown corrosion even after you use an anti-seize on them. A threadlocker in a liquid or stick form completely fills that 70% airgap found in between male and female threads and cures to a hard thermoset plastic which reliably keeps moisture out of the threads, and if we can keep all moisture out of that airspace, we've eliminated rustlock.

If you haven't already-go to page one on this thread, get your favorite Sunday Morning beverage and start reading.

Glad you jumped in with a question. The thread has sorta been quiet for the last few weeks.

Dirty
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Old 03-30-2014, 09:26 AM   #665
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Sorry for the confusion but the threads of the fasteners are free of corrosion. It's the smooth part of the bolt's that are rusting. For example, the body of the swing arm bolt or the dog bone bolts that the 640A have.

Yes, I'm a 243 convert and apply it to everything.
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Old 03-30-2014, 10:26 AM   #666
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I'd clean the non-threaded shank of the bolt shaft with steel wool or hit it a lick with a wire wheel on a bench grinder to clean it up, then rub down the non-threaded shank of the bolt with firm fingertip pressure with a waterproof grease. I use a synthetic zero-water washout grease, but any waterproof grease would be better than nothing, then reassemble.

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Old 03-30-2014, 07:31 PM   #667
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd83-900t View Post
Dirty,

What do you put on your suspension linkage bolts and main swing arm bolt to prevent corrosion. I've tried BelRay water proof grease, grease mixed with molypaste and bacon grease. Over the years I've found that if I don't service the suspension every year or so I'll end up with corroded bolts. The bearings are sealed from water but the bolts aren't and most of the grease is wiped off when you assemble the suspension. I'll give Marine anti-seize a try, but I'm tempted to try some type of wax.

What say the Benevolent Loctite Overlord?
the only solution is to service the bolts/linkage more often. i use waterproof grease, but nothing is 100% sealed and they routinely see water/dirt/etc. disassemble, grease, and reassemble is the only reasonable solution. you could zirk fitting some of the pivots - that kind of depends on the design..
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Old 03-30-2014, 08:19 PM   #668
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I have a bearing for a Cush KTM 640 on one side that has lost its press fit. I'd call it a nice slip fit. The journal isn't spun but looks like it has slipped. I micd the bearing at 52.00mm and the bore at 52.02mm on average

Anyways the plan is retaining compound. I have some 680 but wondering what the best compound would be knowing that I will need to remove at normal maint intervals? Is 680 overkill?

Thanks
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Old 03-30-2014, 08:35 PM   #669
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680 would be a fine choice. We're well within the cure through gap.

Clean the OD of the bearing and the ID of the hub with a good residue-free cleaner degreaser. Spread a thin uniform bead of 680 around the OD of the bearing and slip into place. Wipe off any squeezeout, mount the wheel on the bike, torque the axle nut to spec and let sit overnight. By mounting the wheel you'll be squaring up the bearing and seating it to the proper depth.

That's it. By using a retaining compound the bearing fit will be 3 times stronger than it was off of the factory floor.

Use a little heat for removal. The book says to heat the surface up to 500F for 5 minutes, but once you see that first whisp of smoke, the material will have softened enough you'll be able to tap out the bearing from the inside with a drift and tap hammer.

Great application!

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Old 03-30-2014, 09:07 PM   #670
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Awesome thanks I was worried it was going to be too much. Anything with less heat required to disassemble?
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Old 03-30-2014, 09:12 PM   #671
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If the bearing ever fails-and I doubt it will you could press it out with an arbor press if the throat was deep enough....or you could use an inside jaw slide hammer and a little heat.

It'll be fine.

Dirty
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Old 04-17-2014, 12:37 PM   #672
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Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez View Post
Yup. It depends ALOT on the joint design, but yes, in many applications bonding can be as strong as welding.

Wacky stuff I tell you!

Dirty
Hey Dirty,

Along exactly those lines, what Loctite product would you recommend for attaching a rare earth magnet to a smooth aluminum casting. Specifically I want to make make up a magnetic drain plug for my XT225 by bonding a high temperature magnet into this pocket:

Thanks!



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Old 04-17-2014, 12:46 PM   #673
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Hey Dirty,

Along exactly those lines, what Loctite product would you recommend for attaching a rare earth magnet to a smooth aluminum casting. Specifically I want to make make up a magnetic drain plug for my XT225 by bonding a high temperature magnet into this pocket:

Thanks!



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I'd go in there with a dremel tool and cut a slot in each of those 3 tits, then drop in the magnet and use an internal snap ring in the slots to keep it there. Last thing you want is a magnet getting loose and jamming in a transmission gear.
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Old 04-17-2014, 02:46 PM   #674
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I'd go in there with a dremel tool and cut a slot in each of those 3 tits, then drop in the magnet and use an internal snap ring in the slots to keep it there. Last thing you want is a magnet getting loose and jamming in a transmission gear.
I've seen that done - and there was a fellow who did a short production run over on xt225.com. The rub is the magnets that will tolerate high temperatures without becoming demagnetized are only available in limited size ranges and I can't find one that would be a good fit behind a snap ring in that space without an additional layer to hold it in. If I can find an adhesive that will tolerate oil submersion and the typical crankcase temperatures while providing good shear strength then it's a lot simpler just to glue the thing. Look at the goldplug.com plugs - those are all glued - and I'd be buying one over there but due to the oddball drain plug design, they don't make one for the XT225. By the way, I'm just trying to make one for myself and then share the knowledge.
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Old 04-19-2014, 11:28 AM   #675
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@Dirty_Sanchez .. to the red courtesy phone
your assistance is needed here:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...=969129&page=7

seems on R1200GS rear caliper bolts factory spec is a super low 18ft lb .. which IMHO is a fuck up by BMW. no one else no one else in the world that I'm aware of uses 18ft lb torque that low to hold together a mission critical part like brake calipers.

reports of untouched rear caliper bolts backing out causing wholesale destruction to final drive and/or spokes. best theory is rear fender bobbing around helps rear caliper bolt back out.

assuming proper grade fasteners are used .. an 8mm bolt and cast aluminum bolt threads into is capable of holding torque in excess of 18ft lb spec'd by BMW.

loctite apparently states no change in torque value is needed. but when loctite is applied aprox 11% increase in torque will result. which IHMO is a good thing increasing torque to 20ft lb in this particular application.




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