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Old 01-28-2013, 01:53 PM   #1696
squonker OP
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Originally Posted by 1greenmachine View Post
I'd personally wanna have a pre 07 emission engine so there's no worries about plugging the filter or catalyst.
Agreed 100%. And I will have when I buy my truck...
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:56 PM   #1697
troidus
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Seems like it'd be useful to try to keep as much heat in the truck components as possible. Insulation blankets, heat ducts, electric heaters, exhaust heat exchangers, baffles, whatever. Anything to keep the moving parts moving and the liquids thawed. Heck, lightly dragging the brakes could even be good for keeping the hubs warm and the air lines dry, as long as it didn't stop the wheels from turning.
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:58 PM   #1698
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Originally Posted by squonker View Post
Agreed 100%. And I will have when I buy my truck...
For the most part they have gotten a lot better but still up there with all idle time its asking for issues, or drop the money and get the delete kit.
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Old 01-28-2013, 03:50 PM   #1699
ChazCable
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Glider kits, new truck with reman pre 07 engine, cats arse!
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:28 PM   #1700
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Originally Posted by troidus View Post
Seems like it'd be useful to try to keep as much heat in the truck components as possible. Insulation blankets, heat ducts, electric heaters, exhaust heat exchangers, baffles, whatever. Anything to keep the moving parts moving and the liquids thawed. Heck, lightly dragging the brakes could even be good for keeping the hubs warm and the air lines dry, as long as it didn't stop the wheels from turning.
I think you'll find that heat ducts, electric heaters etc would be more trouble than they're worth. We put belly tarps on the trucks under the engine and tranny, it is mainly to catch drops of oil but I'm sure that they keep a little heat in too. They tend to get too heavy from ice build up though (e.g. air dryer purging) after a while and then they're a bitch to keep on the truck because the only way you can attach them is with rubber grommets and hay wire. Whenever I had one that was too much trouble to keep in place I just ripped it right off and never noticed any difference in coolant or oil temps/pressures as a result.

The trucks are never shut off during the season (other than for maintenance, in which case they're in a heated shop), and they seem to keep their heat pretty well. You have to watch which direction you're facing when you park in high wind (that can have a major effect on your temps), but we all carry winter fronts and various kinds of makeshift 'keep my truck warm' paraphernalia around with us.

Some trucks are more sensitive than others. That T800 I drove didn't care whether you had the front grille covered or not, it barely made any difference at all. But below the main grille was a tiny one - a fraction of the size - that obviously hid a major part of the cooling system because if that wasn't covered the truck would struggle to stay above about 120F coolant temp (180F is normal). All it took was a single piece of cardboard, that made all the difference.

Another thing that can make or break you is whether or not your fuel return line dumps warm fuel back into the tanks. Most trucks do and that'll do more to stop your fuel gelling/waxing than anything you add to it.

As far as keeping the moving parts moving, I have posted before about having spent nights out on portages in extreme cold and how in the morning the trucks were very sluggish to get going until the oil in the diffs had warmed up. It was a very noticeable difference in the way they ran, to the extent that it would be hard to make a clean shift because as soon as you let your foot off the throttle it was as though you had hit the brakes.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:03 PM   #1701
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Originally Posted by squonker View Post
Another thing that can make or break you is whether or not your fuel return line dumps warm fuel back into the tanks. Most trucks do and that'll do more to stop your fuel gelling/waxing than anything you add to it.

As far as keeping the moving parts moving, I have posted before about having spent nights out on portages in extreme cold and how in the morning the trucks were very sluggish to get going until the oil in the diffs had warmed up. It was a very noticeable difference in the way they ran, to the extent that it would be hard to make a clean shift because as soon as you let your foot off the throttle it was as though you had hit the brakes.
One issue with the newer fuel systems is the engines are returning less fuel then before. The ISX would get the return fuel so hot it would turn blackish.

If I was bringing a truck up there the first thing I'd do is straight synthetic for all the fluids as it flows so much better in the cold. So what are the favorite trucks and engines up there?
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:22 PM   #1702
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Originally Posted by 1greenmachine View Post
One issue with the newer fuel systems is the engines are returning less fuel then before. The ISX would get the return fuel so hot it would turn blackish.

If I was bringing a truck up there the first thing I'd do is straight synthetic for all the fluids as it flows so much better in the cold. So what are the favorite trucks and engines up there?
I think the favourite truck and engine thing has been discussed here before, it really just boils down to one of two things: money or personal preference. If money was no object I'd get a Pete' with a C-15. But because I haven't found a rich woman yet I'll likely end up with a Sterling! I love the 3406 and the C-15, think they're great motors. I don't have a lot of experience with Cummins, but the Series 60 Detroit is good in my book, too. I personally wouldn't want a Volvo or a Freightliner as my first choice but I'm sure they're as good as anything else. I think Western Stars are tough trucks, but they're noisy. Macks are a no-go in my opinion. Kenworths I'm told are hard to work on and therefore you're going to be paying your mechanic more.

Ideally I'd have a Scania 143 V8 500, but I know that ain't going to happen! An old Hayles logging truck would be sweet, too...



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Old 01-28-2013, 09:41 PM   #1703
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Stay away from Volvo because they are over engineered pos, lots of electrical issues, freightliners I don't like because very tough to work.. My favorites are Pete's and kenworths long noses. Because they are easy to work on the engines.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:33 PM   #1704
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Hey Unique458, driving anything nice? Safe trip to Edmunton,
99 Kenworth t 600 with 1.6 million km 425 cat and a 13 speed

Unique458 screwed with this post 01-28-2013 at 10:42 PM
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:39 PM   #1705
troidus
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Originally Posted by squonker View Post
I think you'll find that heat ducts, electric heaters etc would be more trouble than they're worth. We put belly tarps on the trucks under the engine and tranny, it is mainly to catch drops of oil but I'm sure that they keep a little heat in too. They tend to get too heavy from ice build up though (e.g. air dryer purging) after a while and then they're a bitch to keep on the truck because the only way you can attach them is with rubber grommets and hay wire.
This makes sense, since snow and ice will get everywhere, given the chance.

Quote:
Some trucks are more sensitive than others. That T800 I drove didn't care whether you had the front grille covered or not, it barely made any difference at all. But below the main grille was a tiny one - a fraction of the size - that obviously hid a major part of the cooling system because if that wasn't covered the truck would struggle to stay above about 120F coolant temp (180F is normal). All it took was a single piece of cardboard, that made all the difference.
Maybe an oil cooler or the last bit of radiator before feeding the water pump.

Quote:
As far as keeping the moving parts moving, I have posted before about having spent nights out on portages in extreme cold and how in the morning the trucks were very sluggish to get going until the oil in the diffs had warmed up. It was a very noticeable difference in the way they ran, to the extent that it would be hard to make a clean shift because as soon as you let your foot off the throttle it was as though you had hit the brakes.
That could be a good place to route waste heat from the exhaust when parked, as long as it could be kept from curling back around and seeping into the sleeper. Adding a liquid-to-air heat exchanger and a circ pump sounds like more complexity than it's worth, but maybe having an exhaust diverter that dumps the exhaust between the diffs when parked would work.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:44 PM   #1706
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Originally Posted by ChazCable View Post
Hey Unique458, driving anything nice? Safe trip to Edmunton,
Left this morning from MT and made it to Edmonton at 11:00pm
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:45 PM   #1707
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Left this morning from MT and made it to Edmonton at 11:00pm
Driving a 99 t 600 ( I think ) with 1.6 mil km 425 cat and a 13 speed
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:53 PM   #1708
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A decent winter front, spare cardboard to MacGyver something, and a good thermal blanket for your tanks and batteries works -- of course, making sure that the electrical system is up to snuff is key. A good shop/wrench-swinger who knows how to winterize properly can make sure to clean up all elec connections, douse them in dilectic gel, swap out the fluids for synth (that helps a LOT with cold weather vs viscosity!).

As stated too, different systems have different quirks about them. You will likely need to tweak and adjust and learn.

Cannot be overstated, that the more FANCY solution you go for, the more likely it is to FAIL, and at the worst possible time. Winter fronts/thermal blankets have no moving parts, and for tank wraps/battery covers, once wired in correctly, almost zero maint except keeping them clean.

The heated fluids return works (if the mfg system worked) well, and as stated, better than anti-gel for the most part, but carrying some never hurts either.

The TRUTH about cold being too cold and freezing metal cannot be overstated, shit just starts to snap and shatter once you reach a critical temperature -- as Squonker stated, plow blades snap/shatter, lug nuts crack, and any small critical part with a manufacturer's flaw that cannot be easily replaced and is 2 weeks away in TimBukThree will find a way to expire at the most inconvenient time...

For the most part, older is better, as there are less "untested" things that can break. Mechanical has the advantage over computerized, insofar as us crashbox jockeys and amateur wrench-swingers can beat on it without needing a computer degree! ;-)
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:43 AM   #1709
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mmmm, 425 mechanical,

beautiful trucks those Scanias Squonker

From a mechanics point of view (which I would be when i gets up there, 2014 maybe?), the Cats are nice to work on, even the new ones, 60 serise are nice too, not too familar with cummins,

Still tryin to figure why Macks are so prone to freezing up there?
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:53 PM   #1710
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The perfect ice road prime mover

Plenty of room to fit a big sleeper.



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