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Old 09-27-2007, 07:09 PM   #16
Lone Rider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonz
.....If you're going way out there on difficult tracks, the soft bags are way safer. ............... But they make me nervous.
Personally, I would stay away from hard bags....for the reasons you typed.

Even not planting a foot, just the bag (and weight of the bike) landing on your delicate lower legs too.
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:13 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonz
The hard bag to back of leg, and broken tib/fib's.
Yep, hard bags can do that, got the scar and the metal to go with it.
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:56 PM   #18
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Luggage

Excellent, a place to insert personal biases cloaked in the form of well meaning input...

I'm a big fan of the pelicans (caribou set up or your own). Advantages over the soft bags is some level of security as I did find that there were simply some times I had to leave my bike unattended during the day, moreso when riding alone.

And most importantly, they crash very well (as far as they are concerned). Some of the aluminum ones don't take the dumpage well. Sure you can pound them out but generally they leak, don't close well and are never quite the same again. Depends of course on the design and weld quality (touratech for example, surprisingly aren't that great) but going for a skookum set like the Jesse's would solve that.

The Pelicans are heavier (something like 10 pounds compared to 7 per side) but what the hey, this isn't really a weight saving exercise by any stretch.

Sure, they are removeable but in reality the dirty bags stay outside and you bring in the inner bags.

Top box, different story. The soft bags are super handy, your crap fits in it really well, and when you stop you can fire your tank bag inside and throw it on your back if you are going for short wander. Some guys have been using the 140L North Face bags, I tried a same sized one from MEC and a 100L one. The 100 seems to be fine. Waterproof material, only downside is that the zippers are not waterproof.
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Old 10-06-2007, 01:50 PM   #19
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I would still stick with the hard bags, they can be dangerous, but they can save your legs too. Just depends on the situation. Jesse bags are really tough, and saved my left leg from loss in this one.







You can crash the odyssey bags pretty good and have them still work well. I hit this truck at 47 miles per hour. There was a collision in front of me and the truck was thrown into my path. Jesse Luggage was smashed and then slid down the street about 35 feet. Purely cosmetic damage, and used them on my summer trip after the bike was out of the shop. And while I know hard luggage can suck a leg under it and snap it, in this case, it helped protect my legs at impact. In a RTW trip, I think you have a greater chance of getting smacked by another vehicle than sucking your leg under. Just my 2 cents, but I would go with hard luggage, and it would be the Jesse's based on my previous experience with them.
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:04 PM   #20
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PWGS RTW bike????

Dude, is this just for something to do in your spare time or are you planning a RTW trip? Too bad you can't come alont to Baja next month! Sure you can't go?
This would help you decide on some things/parts you want or not.
These guys have me thinking about ditching the Jesse's for this run. I don't have any on Danno's bike. I thought keeping him lighter would be better.
Now I'm thinking I might just loose mine too!
Think about it man!!
I'd sure like to try a 21" wheel up front on the GS. We plan on TKC's for this trip.
Mudd says he'd not take em if it was him.
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:40 PM   #21
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I dunno, dude. Seems to me that it's more about the trip, than about having the "perfect" bike.

Me? I'd spend some time learning how to work on my bike. I'd figure out what components typically fail on my bike. I'd want to learn what spares to take.

The rest of it is just not giving in to our normal tendencies to over pack.

Es scheint mir. Seems to me....
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:24 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
I dunno, dude. Seems to me that it's more about the trip, than about having the "perfect" bike.

Me? I'd spend some time learning how to work on my bike. I'd figure out what components typically fail on my bike. I'd want to learn what spares to take.

The rest of it is just not giving in to our normal tendencies to over pack.

Es scheint mir. Seems to me....
It is more about the trip - eventually.

I was hoping to get some sage advice from others who built or took a bike of their dreams around the world and what they would have wanted to do, or what they did and found they didn't need to.

I've been following lots of RR of others doing this with the F650 and the Angola RR and I see that the two guys on Dakars are pretty much stock, same with the 640A. It's an interesting story and maximum abuse of machine and rider. I followed my friend Salvador (Salacar) around South America on his bike which is the same as mine.

I can see the pluses and minuses to both a 17" and 18" rear wheel - ultimately it comes down to tire selection and availablility in third world countries. I was hoping to hear that the 17" tire is available without going to a BMW dealer, but any motorcycle shop will sell an 18" tire whether DOT or not.

Fuel is my biggest issue followed by EPA crap that just gets in the way. Then there is the likelyhood of breaking something BMWish that could be replaced with some Honda brand if properly set-up before the monkey rigging started, like the controls on the handlebars.

I definitely am not planning to carry the kitchen sink, but baggage comes down to security, dependability and light weight. Some soft baggage and maybe some hard panniers (plastic or metal?) It would be nice to lock some things up and walk through the local market for a quick shopping trip.

One thing I did not expect to get when I started this thread was some chump who has a thing against BMW motorcycles and the people who ride them. Who knows absolutely nothing about me or where I've been in the world; which right now only excludes Africa the Middle East and Russia. Hell, I've probably been riding motorcycles longer than he's been alive, but who's to say - I don't him and now I don't want to know him.

I figure the bike will breakdown, have some problems and need to be repaired along the way, that's just normal for a machine. I do know that the shock pivot link is a weak part on the Dakar and the stock suspension does leave something to be desired. The headlight can fall out and the oil pump can fail. Almost everything that can go wrong with a BMW is electrical and that gremlin can catch any new bike.

The thing I like about the F650 is the service interval, far and away makes taking a KTM or any Japanese bike less desirable. The F650 has a proven reputation for going around the world without any major engine service or other component failures.

That and I already own it...

I appreciate the responses so far and hope others will chime in.

As far as the TT-39 tanks go, they are expensive new and the fuel line hoses/connectors sold with the system are junk. At least that's what others have told me.

When it comes down to a packing list it's going to be one four season suit, good MX boots, a tent, sleeping bag, tools and spare parts. A VISA card, passport and an International drivers license. Oh and a damn good camera!

I may not be able to do the whole world at once, and may break it up into continents one at a time but I have to start somewhere, right?

PWGS

(Springs, you know I'd luv to go but I just don't see it happening on such short notice, I needed to put in for leave months ago )
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:30 AM   #23
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wheels/tires and luggage

I don't know what changing out the 17" rear wheel for an 18" will do for the bike overall, but if there's little downside, do it. 18" tires are MUCH more readily available (and cheaper).

I like the TKC80s, too, but sometimes you just have to run what you can find. We had to pick up some tires along the Panama/Costa Rica border to get back to the States. Two 21" fronts, one 18" rear, one 17" rear. The 17" rear cost almost as much as the other three combined.

(That being said, the whole bill was about $150, and those tires got me all the way home to Seattle and then some.)

Luggage is a bit trickier. On my DRZ400, only soft bags. I've modified bicycle panniers. They fit narrower and lower than the Ortleibs, although they're not waterproof. But after a few trips to Baja, the Ortleibs weren't waterproof either. But I would have wished for locking hard bags if I were alone. It was nice to leave one person with the bikes while the other one wrangled the borders.

have fun!
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:52 AM   #24
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Hey TrvlGrl, thanks, you will have to come to Engles (in Edmonds) some night and hang with the ADVdogs. I'm going to try this Thursday to be there...
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Old 10-09-2007, 01:54 AM   #25
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Hey PacWestGS. The F650GS/Dakar would make an excellent RTW bike in more or less stock form, I reckon. Plenty of dudes seem to have proven them thus far (Smelly Biker, Helge Pedersen, Vladimir Yarets). It would have been interesting to see how the reputation of them went if Boorman and McGregor chose a couple of these for LWR or LWD.
A big +1 from me on the Caribou luggage system, they even do a Pelican topcase now.
The stock bike can get nearly 400km a tank in gentle going. Admit this will be drastically reduced in soft sand or headwinds. A 5 or 10 litre plastic jerry with spout might be a cheaper option than TT tanks. You only need to fill it when you need it and won't weigh too much when empty. This would give you 22-27 litres. How about a multi-fuel stove and use a few MSR bottles in addition? Again, they weigh SFA when empty.
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:09 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
One thing I did not expect to get when I started this thread was some chump who has a thing against BMW motorcycles and the people who ride them. Who knows absolutely nothing about me or where I've been in the world; which right now only excludes Africa the Middle East and Russia. Hell, I've probably been riding motorcycles longer than he's been alive, but who's to say - I don't him and now I don't want to know him.
Whoa bubba, hang on....I see you really appreciated my tips!

Did you imagine this to be your personal "BMW's Only" exclusive Captain's Room forum? Chimp. . I didn't say I knew you...I said you had a SMUG aire of superiority regards BMW and a dismissive attitude towards Japanese bikes...not to mention a fair bit of ignorance.

Riding "longer than I've been alive?" I wish! You just have no idea Bubba.
I merely suggested you not dismiss as inferior bikes you've not owned.
Am I off base with this comment? Is that offensive to you? I don't want to compare Dick lengths regards riding experience or countries visited...but you know...a man's got to know his limitations.

Tell me all the Japanese dual sports you've owned and ridden to 3rd world countries on. I've owned and ridden bikes from all four OEMs. (XL185, XL600, XR650-L, XR250, XT350, DR350, DR650, DRZ400, , KLR650, KLR250, KTM640).

I try to help with a couple really good contacts...(among other points about the bike) and this is your response? Nice. Real class act. I guess I really am a Chump...for trying to help you out. Remember, I always carry that Tourtech Tow rope....but it'll cost you.

Maybe you should go back to Wet-G-Spot, Chain-male-Gang or Jo Pucho Mama and ask advice there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
I figure the bike will breakdown, have some problems and need to be repaired along the way, that's just normal for a machine. I do know that the shock pivot link is a weak part on the Dakar and the stock suspension does leave something to be desired. The headlight can fall out and the oil pump can fail. Almost everything that can go wrong with a BMW is electrical and that gremlin can catch any new bike.
Huh?
And you're accusing ME of being anti BMW? Read what you've written above! Stop now! Ditch this bike and start over if even half of what you've written is even semi-true Have you been talking to Smelly Biker again?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
The thing I like about the F650 is the service interval, far and away makes taking a KTM or any Japanese bike less desirable. The F650 has a proven reputation for going around the world without any major engine service or other component failures.
This is perfect. Sheesh. Your above statement really shows a complete LACK of knowledge and experience....even stupidity. Have you really thought about what you've said there?

Tell me the "service intervals" of the F650 and what specific items make it "far and away" better or easier to maintain than any Jap dual sport?

Can I assume you refer to common things like:
Oil Change? Valve adjustment? Chain/Sprockets? Air filter? Brake Fluid change? Ah....gee, I ran out of things most Japanese ever bikes need in terms of "service". Please tell us in what way any Japanese dual sport bike needs more frequent service than your Rotax...ahh ...BMW. Do you go 10,000 miles between oil changes? How far on a chain? My DR asks for a valve clearance check every 6K miles. Gee, big deal, takes all of 15 minutes on the screw adjusters. Doesn't the F650 have shim under bucket?

Oh, maybe the BMW needs a fuel injection re-map or a new module every 12K miles?...none of the Jap dual sports have f.I. Or maybe you have to fuss over the butter-like wheel and head bearings Smelly Biker has replaced so many times....?

I can see some reasons to go with the F650...it IS a pretty bike... but longer service intervals ain't it! Maybe you like the color of the Blue Rondell better in the evening sunlight?
Or the beautiful BMW exclusive gear you get to spend two grand on when you ride the F650...Dunno? The Club-like ambiance at BMW dealerships?

The intervals on ALL these single cylinder, chain driven bikes is pretty much exactly the same....with the exception that it would be RARE for any of the Japanese bikes to suffer the kind of major failures you've outlined above. On the F650 it is just not that rare.... now is it? Now why is that?

As an aside...in your extensive research you may find that more Japanese dual sport bikes have done RTW than the F650's. And most without the kind of major failures you describe.

BTW,...in your worries about tires you stress out over finding a BMW dealer to procure a 17" rear tire. Hmmm. Did you know that Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha and Kawasaki all make bikes that use a .......guess what? A 17" rear tire! (XR-L, DR650, XT600, KLR). Hey, whaddya know...its the SAME SIZE as the one you run! Will little miracles never cease? (120/130 - 17") So this just increased the possibility by four times you might find the right tire. Yes, I'm aware not many 3rd world dealerships will sell these bikes...but some will stock them or can get them in a timely manner. Email ahead, use CC. (see my earlier post)

Now how about that! I can see you've really done your homework on this one. And I'm sure you knew that Japanese dealers will be represented in most countries (on average) at a rate of about 30 to 1 compared to BMW dealers? (In most places more like 40 to 1) So those Honda "Monkey parts" you refer to might be all you can get.....Chump! Or should that be ....Chimp!


So ride the BMW, have fun. But don't be under any "Kool Aid" illussions you are riding something that is somehow vastly superior than the run of the mill Japanese dual sport. Just because you've paid about double the price for you Dakar than I paid to my DR650.
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:42 PM   #27
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See that's just my point - everything in your eyes is anti-BMW no matter which way is up. Everybody builds a bike that is superior to the F650 I should just start all over and sell my trusty BMWs and go back to Honda, Yamaha and Kawasaki like before. Oh yeah and the Bultaco I started on in 1976.

Last I heard KTM has a 2500 mile service interval for oil changes and requires valve checks every 5000, but since I've never owned a KTM that must be second hand information.

My friends XR650 gets a new top end every 25,000 miles because it needs it, but maybe he's doing something wrong.

I don't even know why I responded to you.

I thanked you for your advice, I checked out HU and found some useful information.

So how long have you been riding?

You are the one that came out calling me smug with an attitude - I still don't know where that came from.

Again thanks for your help, but I didn't understand where your opinion came from until I searched around and found that you are against BMWs, the trendy people who ride them and how those same people go to small countries and jack up the price of everything because they want to follow some other trendy movie star with a caravan of support vehicles. Am I wrong about you? Did I miss something?

I'm not that person, even though I do (now) own three BMW bikes, I came from a long line of fixer-upper Japanese motorcycles some new some old. Had fun on all of them, still own one...
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Old 10-10-2007, 11:52 AM   #28
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So lets get this thread back on track. I had no intention of doing a BMW bashing piece.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
Oh yeah and the Bultaco I started on in 1976. So how long have you been riding?
To answer your question on this.....I was racing my Bultaco Pursang at Ascot
Park in SoCal in 1968. About 45 bikes since then.

But none of that matters. I apologize for de-railing your thread. It's your thread, about YOUR trip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
Again thanks for your help, but I didn't understand where your opinion came from until I searched around and found that you are against BMWs, the trendy people who ride them and how those same people go to small countries and jack up the price of everything because they want to follow some other trendy movie star with a caravan of support vehicles. Am I wrong about you? Did I miss something?
Oh yes, I've been very critical of BMW and the "lifestyle". (X BMW owner) I actually really liked Ewan and Charlies' film...just wish they had taken the right bike. (KTM really blew that one!) My opinion comes more from those I see on ADV! That and the fact I ride with a bunch of BMW guys....all friends 'ya unnastan!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PacWestGS
I'm not that person, even though I do (now) own three BMW bikes, I came from a long line of fixer-upper Japanese motorcycles some new some old. Had fun on all of them, still own one...
Fair enough. Like has been spoke by many wise travelers, "its' the trip not the bike". I never had more fun than doing a Surf trips to Baja in 1963, exploring empty beaches on my Honda 50. Later, going further afield on a XL185. In the 90's touring N. Thailand on a 125cc MTX dual sport two stroke was another highlight. Best trips ever. The bikes were merely conduits to another world in the imagination.
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Old 10-10-2007, 08:37 PM   #29
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(P.S. I probably watched you then at Ascot Park if you kept doing that sort of thing into the early '70s. My family went to watch the Outlaw's (as they're now called) and a few TTs. I once raced a bicycle (BMX) there (circa 1973).

Cheers!
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Old 10-11-2007, 12:47 AM   #30
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OK, so I've considered a couple of these 20L collapsible jerry cans http://www.turtlepac.com/sportdetails.htm as found here on ADVrider, yeah; I love this place.

I'm leaning towards Pelican luggage at this point.

I think the rear wheel tire choice (wheel rim size) has been delt with and the original 17-incher is probably fine. (If I'm willing to pay a bit more for a tire.)

What about handlebars and switch gear? Go generic or keep with the original stuff until a problem developes?

Lights, they may not be needed if I plan to ride less or not at all at night. I know my HIDs on the big bike have saved my ass more than once, but how much do you plan for the journey before you take it?

Just asking?
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