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Old 12-12-2010, 02:00 PM   #1
SilentRay OP
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V Strom aerodynamics versus other bikes

As much as i like my DL650, i really don't like the aerodynamics (or lack of) of it. We all know of the serious buffeting issue of the Strom windshield. I think the Madstad bracket (which i have) does a pretty good job of eliminating most of that buffeting. But my concern is how much the bike as a whole catches a lot of wind.

Heres how my Wee is set up. Madstad with stock screen, front fork brace, tank bag, Happy Trails panniers (surely hurts aerodynamics), stock suspension except for Sonic fork springs.

On a trip out west this past summer, i was riding with a 1200GSA and a 2010 Road Glide. I know the Glide can't compare to the GS or Strom because of its lower profile and added weight, but ... While going thru Kansas and Oklahoma we hit a lot of cross winds. I was constantly leaned over farther making lean angle adjustments. When we entered Colorado we ended up riding beside some mean storm clouds. Then all at once, we were on the edge of a tornado and trying to get under cover. With no where to go, except the next exit a mile or so away, we decided to open em up and try to beat the worst of the wind. I was in the lead when the biggest wind hit us and was blown clear into the middle of the other lane (with asshole seriously puckered). I decided to slow down some and try to make my self more areodynamic. While trying to keep from getting picked up and slammed to the pavement, the GS and Harley rode right thru that stretch without much problem.

When the girl friend and i are two up, with the rear shock on firm, are on some highway stretches, the bike bobs (?) back and forth like when your behind a tractor trailer. She noticed it the first time we rode two up. I was surprised how much it done it.

Buddy of my has a DL1000 and has told me that one time he was riding beside a Goldwing and they hit a big wind blast. He and his Strom were blown into the passing lane while the Wing sliced right thru it!

Does the Strom's fairing suck in comparison to other beasts?

If so, why? Is it a combination of poor design by mother Zuke and mediocre suspension?

How do other beasts like the older Tigers, Trans Alps, Uly's, Capo's, etc. compare?

Or is the Strom that much different than other beasts.

With the Strom just being a half faired bike, i'm really surprised at the amount of wind it catches.

Sorry for the long "winded" post. But i feel i need to add that even with having to deal with the poor areodynamics of the Strom, it's still one of the best all around bikes i've ever had. Solid engine, reliable, and easy to maintain.

What say you?
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Old 12-12-2010, 03:32 PM   #2
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Not the fairing

I tend to think its a matter of weight. The crosswind has more effect on the lighter bike.
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Old 12-12-2010, 04:12 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by 8dust View Post
I tend to think its a matter of weight. The crosswind has more effect on the lighter bike.
Thought about that, but... You may be right
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Old 12-12-2010, 04:12 PM   #4
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I think part of the problem is lift. Raising the fork tubes in the triple clamps 7-15mm lowers the angle of attack of the fairing pieces and seems to make the bike feel more stable. That is the opposite of what the steering geometry change should cause. I figure the aerodynamics of lift must be involved.
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Old 12-12-2010, 04:40 PM   #5
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I was wondering when /if you'd respond

Lift is right. I forgot to mention the time on a long sweeper, at fast pace, when the wind kicked up just right and pushed me way off my line. I think the vast hollowness of the fairing/tank area had a lot to do with that.

Yes, i have heard that quite a few Strom riders raise their fork tubes 1/2" or so. I've left mine stock. I like having as much ground clearance as possible.

Thanks
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:33 PM   #6
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If you like your ground clearance...get raising links. Ground clearance, and improved geometry.


The Strom is the shitty aerodynamic poster child of the adventure bike world, but I don't think any of them are great. Tall bike, bluff/squarish face, partial coverage fairing positioned far from the rider - all bad things most adventure bikes have in common. The strom is just the worst.
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenngineer View Post
If you like your ground clearance...get raising links. Ground clearance, and improved geometry.


The Strom is the shitty aerodynamic poster child of the adventure bike world, but I don't think any of them are great. Tall bike, bluff/squarish face, partial coverage fairing positioned far from the rider - all bad things most adventure bikes have in common. The strom is just the worst.



Come on. Tell the truth now

At only 5'11" i barely can flat foot the beast as it is. Always thought i really needed to be on a F650, but my knees probably wouldn't like it for long.
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Old 12-12-2010, 06:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywolf View Post
I think part of the problem is lift. Raising the fork tubes in the triple clamps 7-15mm lowers the angle of attack of the fairing pieces and seems to make the bike feel more stable. That is the opposite of what the steering geometry change should cause. I figure the aerodynamics of lift must be involved.
I lowered the triple tree on my DL650 22mm (3/4") to lower the seat height. I have no cross wind stability issues.
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:06 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by MADSTROM View Post
I lowered the triple tree on my DL650 22mm (3/4") to lower the seat height. I have no cross wind stability issues.

Cool.
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MADSTROM View Post
I lowered the triple tree on my DL650 22mm (3/4") to lower the seat height. I have no cross wind stability issues.
Did the same. Same result.

THEN I added a 1" lift (dogbones)... HOLY WORTHLESS HEADLIGHTS BATMAN! Raised the tree to where it was before, and maintained the same geometry as no lift/raised forks.

Other Strommers have noticed an amazing reduction in buffeting after removal of side mirrors...
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:58 PM   #11
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You could have adjusted the headlights. ABS bikes with fork braces can crash the brace into the brake piping junction under the bottom triple clamp if the front is lowered more than 7mm for a Superbrace or 10mm for other braces.
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Old 12-12-2010, 08:22 PM   #12
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You could have adjusted the headlights.
But that would take precision and time. I only had to live two days with the misalignment, so it never posed a safety threat.
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Old 12-12-2010, 09:57 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by CoastalDefender View Post
Did the same. Same result.

THEN I added a 1" lift (dogbones)... HOLY WORTHLESS HEADLIGHTS BATMAN! Raised the tree to where it was before, and maintained the same geometry as no lift/raised forks.

Other Strommers have noticed an amazing reduction in buffeting after removal of side mirrors...
Thanks for the input guys.

I forgot to mention several other mods i've made.

Removed the huge/heavy stock mirrors and replaced them with Ken Sean folding mirrors. Installed 1 1/4 (?) up and back bar risers. And previous owner installed a bar snake.

Don't think any of these changes made a difference one way or the other regarding wind. Also no change in buffeting with smaller mirrors.
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Old 12-12-2010, 11:13 PM   #14
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Buffeting on the wee has to do with a broad windshield combined with a non streamlined bodywork. Try to get some clean air on the rider side of the windshield.
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Old 12-13-2010, 02:26 AM   #15
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The Givi shield, when i had one, helps reduce the buffeting a little more than the stocker does, but thats not what really annoys me.

Sometimes wish i could ride the sports bikes comfortably again for the long trips. But then i'd be again limited to mainly street riddin.

Bet converting the mighty Strom into a thinstrom takes care of those bothersome wind streams.

If i was tallented enough to transform the front end of my Wee into more d/s trim, i'd do it in a heart beat. Sure would miss the stock light set up though.

Spent many day checkin out Oz's ThinStrom.
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