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Old 12-27-2007, 11:49 PM   #61
_Tuf_
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratmunch
By the way, nice bike, almost bought one myself, but decided on a Daytona instead.
Almost my very same experience. After riding all manner of bikes I decided that the Tiger was clearly the best choice for me .... but then I rode a Tuono ... and bought one of those



Ah well. Who needs all that mileage, touring comfort and ABS anyway?
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Old 12-28-2007, 05:52 AM   #62
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Nice write up! I'm one of those 6'3" types, that the GSADV seems designed for.

I think Triumph is nicely carving out their own part of the "Adventure Lite" market by producing the new, smaller, more street oriented Tiger.

Cool.
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Old 12-28-2007, 08:47 PM   #63
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Got some good riding time in today -- it's been a while between the crappy weather and the holidays. Had occasion to be in Manhattan in the afternoon. I feel much more confident lane splitting on the Tiger than on the GS. The Tiger feels narrower. I don't know if it's all that much narrower than the GS but it certainly feels that way. I know the bars are narrower but I'm not sure by exactly how much.

I think the increase in confidence comes from a perceived (and actual) reduction in the width of the bike as well as better low-speed stability compared to the GS. I just feel like I'm able to control the bike better at low speeds.

Just another little observational tidbit as I get the chance to put some more miles on the bike.
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Old 12-28-2007, 09:05 PM   #64
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if it hasn't been said already....LOWER your pressures.

the dealer got it almost right...keep them in the low 30s.

thorough write-up!

abe
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Old 12-28-2007, 09:11 PM   #65
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and it's:

up up down down left right left right b a select start...

contra!

abe
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Old 12-29-2007, 04:16 AM   #66
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for the cold starting woes...rotella t syn 5w40.

abe
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Old 12-29-2007, 08:45 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonsr
if it hasn't been said already....LOWER your pressures.

the dealer got it almost right...keep them in the low 30s.

thorough write-up!

abe
I'm gonna go with Triumph's recommendation over the dealer's setup. I'd like to think Triumph knew what they were doing when they designed the thing. That plus the dealer also got the suspension setup wrong.
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Old 12-29-2007, 08:53 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonsr
for the cold starting woes...rotella t syn 5w40.

abe
Nah, not an oil issue. It cranks fine, a lighter oil would have no effect here. It's an engine management issue and not really an issue anyway. Triumph specifies Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 synthetic motorcycle oil. There is some debate as to whether that is factory fill or whether there is a non-synthetic break-in oil as factory fill. At any rate, after the 600 mile oil change, it gets filled with the Mobil 1 4T.

This is one of those expensive motorcycle oils. I didn't bother with motorcycle oils in the GS because it has a dry clutch and therefore oil composition can have no effect on the clutch operation. However it seems that all the latest and greatest automotive synthetic oils have all kinds of energy-conserving friction modifiers that can play havoc with the clutch if used in a wet-clutch motorcycle.

So I've decided to use Triumph's recommended oil, though not purchased from Triumph -- my local AutoZone carries it. Still ain't cheap though, about $9 per quart

It meets API specs SG, SH/CF but the big one according to Triumph is that it meets JASO MA spec.

Next time I'm down at the auto parts store I'll spend some time reading oil bottles and see if there's anything else out there that qualifies.
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Old 12-29-2007, 06:34 PM   #69
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I am also interested in alternative oil. At $50 per oil change I may be walking soon; especially with a new bike on its way.
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Old 12-31-2007, 06:02 PM   #70
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A bit over 3k on mine and not a drop of oil used. I think it has to do with how the engine is broken in.

I've noticed a trend (especially in the dirtbike world) of bikes moving back to cable-actuated clutches. I find them smoother and easier to feather than the on/off feel of a hydraulic unit.

I am one of those who find the rear shock weak on the bike however. I've tweaked and tweaked and can't find the sweet spot. Otherwise, its a damn comfortable motorcycle and fun to ride.

BTW, I installed the off-road fuel map but run the stock exhaust. It really woke the bike up and made an already smooth engine even better. Highly recommend it.
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Old 01-01-2008, 02:23 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjbartnik
Nah, not an oil issue. It cranks fine, a lighter oil would have no effect here. It's an engine management issue and not really an issue anyway. Triumph specifies Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 synthetic motorcycle oil. There is some debate as to whether that is factory fill or whether there is a non-synthetic break-in oil as factory fill. At any rate, after the 600 mile oil change, it gets filled with the Mobil 1 4T.

This is one of those expensive motorcycle oils. I didn't bother with motorcycle oils in the GS because it has a dry clutch and therefore oil composition can have no effect on the clutch operation. However it seems that all the latest and greatest automotive synthetic oils have all kinds of energy-conserving friction modifiers that can play havoc with the clutch if used in a wet-clutch motorcycle.

So I've decided to use Triumph's recommended oil, though not purchased from Triumph -- my local AutoZone carries it. Still ain't cheap though, about $9 per quart

It meets API specs SG, SH/CF but the big one according to Triumph is that it meets JASO MA spec.

Next time I'm down at the auto parts store I'll spend some time reading oil bottles and see if there's anything else out there that qualifies.


Best way to determine whether or not an oil is clutch safe is to know exactly which additives could cause potential issues and then look at a VOA of the oil you'd like to try...You'd be surprized at how strong some of the car oils are in comparison...Many car oils would pass JASO specs with ease...Unfortunately, they aren't marketed for motorcycles so they don't waste time or costs with JASO certification...Unfortunately you won't find a VOA on the bottle of oil...There is a website called bobistheoilguy that has lots and lots of VOA's...Rotella 5w40 is big with alot of the motorcycle owners that are members there because they're getting really good results from their used oil analysis...
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Old 01-01-2008, 03:44 AM   #72
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Our Tiger 1050 has now covered a fault-free 31,000km, and is IMO a better overall package than even the widely lauded R1200GS, if your riding emphasis is mainly sealed roads. We also own three GS's plus some Wee-Stroms in our rental fleet so what follows is a few comments on the Tiger set against my experiences with the overall excellent BMW.

While the new Tiger has less off-road abilities than the BMW or KTM or even it's very own predessesor, with a few simple mods I have found it to be every bit as good as the Wee-Strom on the loose stuff but perhaps more importantly, performs it's road functions with greater aclarity and huge rider satisfaction.

My list of add-on farkles includes:
Fender extender.
Factory centre stand.
Lowered at rear by 30mm.
SW MOtech QD pannier racks supporting Givis.
SW MOtech Alu rack, Givi top-box.
Touring screen fitted with MRA Vario deflector.
SW MOtech pull-back handlebar risers.
Corbin seat.
Factory tank bag.
Dunlop D616 deep tread radials front and rear.
One tooth bigger (19T) countershaft sprocket.
Factory pipe.

If the Distanzias, Escapes, Tourances and Anakies etc can be described at 80/20 road/dirt, then I would rate the Dunlop D616 as 85/15. Fitted with these Dunlops and the suspension preload wound up to max at both ends with damping adjusted to suit, I have found that the Tiger can be punted along a dirt road with similar speed and surety to most other genuine dual-sports machines.

This is one of those rare motorcycles that causes a grin that makes you look for excuses to go ride again, and again, and again! It's fuelling is spot on right through the range and it will run right down to 25mph in 6th then pull like a D9 Cat as soon as you open the taps. There is no vibration to speak of at any speed or at any revs and the power is totally linear from bottom to top unlike the R1200GS which leaves you short on the drive out of turns but then kicks in harder at about 5500rpm.

From 100kph (60mph) the GS pulls hard in a top gear roll-on but this bike pulls harder. My wife and I tested this several times at varying starting speeds with her lighter body astride the 1200GS while my extra 25kg worked against the Triple.

This bike has toured the length and breadth of Australia's eastern states and equits itself beautifully, generally returning 300 to 350km from it's 20L tank depending on riding style. It's purchase price is $16,500 compared to $22,500 for the GS (Australian prices) which is a nice compromise between the cheaper V-Stroms and the luxo Beema.

Chain and sprokets V shaft drive? Our newest R1200GS required a new diff assembly at 47,000km. Fortunately this was replaced under warranty otherwise the cost would have been $1700. Regularly oiled, the Tiger is still on it's original chain and sprockets at 31,000km. I expect to fit a new chain soon while the original sprockets are still in good nick. The lot will be replaced around 50,000kays. Total cost including chain oil, maybe $350.

Comfort? Excellent, even better with the Corbin seat. One of the main causes of discomfort is the old tingling engine vibe that goes to work on your derriere after an hour or two. IMO the 1050 triple is one of motorcycling's great motors with no such vibration issues. I have found it to offer a better perch than the Beema on which to spend lots of touring hours.

The bottom line is that the new Triumph Tiger 1050 strictly speaking, is not a genuine "dual-sort"... but with a few mods and a confident rider, can do just as well as many other so-called true dual-sports when the tar turns to dirt! Grizzly(hope-I-havn't-bored-you-silly)bear.



Grizzlybear screwed with this post 01-01-2008 at 03:58 AM
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Old 01-01-2008, 04:42 PM   #73
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Excellent well balanced thread/posts. I went with the Sprint this last time, but suffer from same buyer addiction so a Tiger could be next. The triple motor is the common DNA. It has a balance that flat works. I agree the BMW finish is a bit higher, but IMHO Triumph offers one of the best values on the market with excellent reliability and enjoyment. I've owned/ridden many brands over the years and believe everyone should buy/ride what calls to them the strongest. Our wants and needs change a bunch over the years so keep an open mind to possible future stable mates.

For the cold start issue, try this. Another rider with a top mechanic shared this and it may be total B.S., but my bike starts hot/cold/rain with no problems. The older ECU (pre 07) had the ability to "hold in memory" various bits of collected data to be used at the next start, temp, etc. The theory was that a purge may be helpful so it could start with clean data with no fuzzy memories and this would eliminate any start up problems. Place your bike on the stand in neutral. Do not touch the throttle. Turn on the key and let the ECU go through it's wake up and also hear the fuel pump stop. Start the bike and let it idle until the fan comes on. Turn the bike off having NOT touched the throttle at any time. The information was that the ECU should now have clean data to work with and the need to feather the throttle should not be required. YMMV, but couldn't hurt. I also move my bike out of my non-heated garage prior to start up. I always pull in the clutch to free any stiction in the plates. Make sure bike is in neutral and keep clutch pulled in when first started. It at times will stumble a bit, but never stalls. When into 30's, low 40's, there is an amazing amount of drag. Watch the back tire spin away while in neutral. LOL.

My bike has a little more than 10K in 6 months. It uses no oil. I ride in the rain often so I oil my chain alot. It only takes a second to spray it when I get home or at a camp and I have only had to adjust the chain 3 times (I keep it on loose side). Bags came with the Sprint, small but work/look good. I have a Givi for the top. Tire pressure and suspension settings. I agree, start at OEM recommended and adjust from there. Two up with camping gear will be far from track day tire pressures. Tiger has same basic susp as Speed3. Have someone properly set these up with/for you and I think for 90% of riding they will be very good.

Next to a proper fit (mental and ergonomics) the dealer has so much to do with opinion of a vehicle. I am fortunate to have a great shop, but as you posted on improper set up, I have have read too many bad dealer stories. Regardless if Triumph, BMW, UJM, et al, bad ones make for minor irritation to real unhappy ownership. Then it becomes Kool Aid vs changing brands.

Cheers! Enjoy her!
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Old 01-02-2008, 02:43 PM   #74
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I have my 1050 since Oct '07. I have just 1500 miles on it. I had a Triumph America before this. What a difference! I'm so glad the Tiger 1050 came along when it did as I was really done with the America. Poor ergonomics just killed my hands and back. The Tiger is such a pleasure to ride. I put the heated grips, side luggage, and center stand on. I was going to go with the TOR can but from what I've read on the Tiger1050 site, the TOR tune makes things too rich on the med to upper rpms. It does correct the lean situation on idle to med throttle which was needed to pass emissions. I have heard different stories on oil usage. Some owners say it's in how the engine was broken in. I did it by the book and so far no oil usage in 900 miles. It's a great ride.
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Old 01-02-2008, 03:08 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a1fa
Can anyone dare to elaborate how is Tiger on the dirt roads with knobbies on? I see a lot of older model tigers playing in the dirt, but not the 1050.
The only thing the 1050 shares with the older Tigers is the name.
It's a roadbike, pure and simple.

I owned a 98 Tiger and an 02 Sprint ST, and my new 1050 will run away from both of those machines and leave them for dead.

My 1050 has the Triumph off road can and matching tune, and has yet to lose in a stoplight drag race.

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