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Old 08-26-2014, 09:31 PM   #1
cdriscollmeir OP
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Just Another Dirty Maritimes Ride Report...

My friend and co-worker Dan and I had been talking about doing a Nova Scotia trip over the last year. He's on a V-Strom, and I come from a dirt bike background, and don't think my Berg would be the right bike for the trip. I planned on renting a GS from MotoVermont, but in April I broke down and bought a cherry F800GS from adventurelounger which allowed this plan to quickly come to fruition. So the plan: A ten day, 3,000 mile Maritime trip through New Brunswick, PEI and Nova Scotia, trying to mix in a variety of pavement, gravel, railbeds and trails.

We nailed down a departure date early in the summer, Thursday August 7th. I was in charge of the route planning, and I had all summer to put together something fantastic. I went to my camp in Maine for the week of the 4th, and sought the help of Fundy Rider for a route through New Brunswick. After a few games of phone tag, he was kind enough to make time to meet up for coffee and set us up with a nice start to our Canadian adventure. I zipped up the 90 miles to St. Stephen one morning and before I knew it, I had a route for Day 3! I returned home from vacation feeling like I'd gotten a lot done...and before I knew it, August was fast approaching.

So then I went and did it. Unbelievable. I threw my back out for the first time in my life. All I can say is Wow. I'm sure many of you know what it's like, but I couldn't move. One of those stupid lift with your back instead of your legs things. 12 Days to departure. I stayed optimistic, but part of me couldn't envision going forward with the trip. Hey, if two yahoos like Ewan and Charlie can do it...Christ.

Being forced horizontal, I finally started working on the route. I was certainly going to act as if I were going. I began where Fundy Rider had left us, Day 4, PEI. I knew there wasn't much for twisties on the island, but I knew I could find a bunch of those beautiful red clay roads. Sure enough, they were visible from satellite, and I was amazed by how much google street view was available to help in my road selections. Upon finishing the route for the day, I realized it took me 7 hours and I had 8 more days to map out. It's August 1st, eight days to departure. Hmmmm, did I mention I had all summer to do this?

Needless to say, I got it done. It's an aspect of the entire experience that I really enjoy. I knew investing a lot of time in the route planning would make the trip that much more enjoyable. We were trying to do over 3000 miles in 10 days. This wouldn't be an issue if we were planning on slabbing it, but the idea was to spend time on the less traveled roads, and this can have a way of slowing you down. I really had no idea if my daily mileages were realistic. We'd have to find out. For each day, I'd located a couple gas stops, a potential food stop or two, and an possible camp site to finish the day at. The only place we had to be at a given time was Digby to catch the ferry on Friday morning - the 9th day of the trip. The rest could be altered as needed.

Wednesday night: I got the bike mostly packed and ready to go. Tomorrow's the big day.



Day 1, Thursday: Burlington, VT to Rangeley, Maine. 225 Miles



Dan had to put in half a day of work at the office, so we planned to be side stands up by 1. We had two short days ahead of us to get to my camp in Harrington, Maine. Tonight's destination, Cupsuptic Campground just shy of Rangely, Maine. Just before we left I thought to call and make sure there would be a site, and good thing I did as we reserved one of the last ones. The plan was to follow the NNEAT trail to the campsite. We were facing scattered thundershowers. I decided a few days earlier to purchase a banana suit. I mean, what's better than a waterproof onesie?

Dan arrived on time, and we were headed.



It wasn't twenty minutes before I had him riding his Strom through flowing rivers and narrow class 4 roads of VT.





We were only about an hour underway when the skies in front of us got extremely dark, and sure enough, let loose. It POURED. I mean, unbelievably. I crossed a bridge in Lowell, VT and the water was nearly over my tires. We decided to pull off at Cajuns for a late lunch and see if it would pass. We sat there and laughed – still better than a day at the office. Got back on the road and our luck changed for a while. We made it to Cedar Swamp Road in NH, and what a treat! Unbelievable how smooth this twisty fine gravel road was. It being wet, made the traction unbelievable. We made it about 13 miles in before the rain began again, and combined with the waning light, made the second half of this phenomenal road a bit more challenging.



We made it to the Campsite as the owner was hanging a map on the door for us. We found our tent site and quickly set up shop before the light was gone. It was a nice site right next to the lake, though packed full and close to many neighbors. Not planning well, we rode ahead the 10 miles to Rangely to hit a convenience store for the evening's supplies. Upon returning, it was as if there was a curfew. In that 45 minutes the booming place had completely shut down. We had a little fire, some snacks, and called it a night. The plan was to get into Harrington at a decent hour tomorrow and do Friday night dinner with my grandparents.





Day 2, Friday: Rangeley, ME to Harrington, ME. 260 miles.



We woke up and packed up our wet gear. I forgot to bring a tarp for under my tent, but bought one of those red and white checkered picnic tablecloths...worked like a charm. Dan brewed us up some morning coffee, and we were lazily on the road by 9. We slabbed it for a while on 16 and had to stop up and say hi to Sugarloaf, one of my favorite winter destinations.



Here's a shot of the Strom with Mt. Bigelow in the background. I was told as a kid that it's silhouette was of a buried Indian Chief whose headdress starts at the far right, his hands laid across his chest, and his toes sticking up in the air above the right side of the windscreen. Picture doesn't so it justice.



I was about to mention to Dan how I bet these signs are put out for the tourist's “benefit”, to perpetuate the Maine image etc. etc., until I looked down and there were literally both large and smaller moose tracks in the gravel on the side of the road. Too funny.





A few miles up the road we found signs directing us up to this scenic overlook.





We then slabbed it for a couple hours. There wasn't much exciting through central Maine. We continued to dodge rainclouds, though it appeared that we wouldn't be so lucky in the future. Then we rounded a corner on a remote road around Rutland, and there was smoke and a couple cop cars. They have us pull over and I look to the right and a house is fully ablaze. Fire trucks were on their way in the narrow road. Meanwhile, an older lady is wailing hysterically and collapses a foot behind Dan's rear tire. We felt helpless. The cops weren't going anywhere near the house, and the firemen were arriving. We creeped forward to let the officers attend to the woman, and then were told to move on. It was strange to just move on after seeing something like that. Our biggest concern was how wet we might get in the upcoming hour.

We made our way past Bangor and headed up to an area I'd explored when up in July. There are some great roads that take you up past the new wind towers and eventually through to the vast blueberry barrens. From here we could spend hours wiggling our way to the coast.











It's really amazing how big they are. What do they do when it's time to change a bearing? Somehow, we were able to avoid this wall of rainclouds in front of us.







The barrens are breathtaking the first time that you see them. Endless roads to explore. We were passing through in peak harvest season so we had to stay sharp, but normally you'd be lucky to run into anyone out there. The skies started to part for us.











We made it to my camp around 4 and got a fire roaring in the wood stove to dry out all our gear. We only had to head 5 minutes across the peninsula to my grandparent's cottage for dinner. They have a big family dinner every friday night for whoever's around and we were lucky enough to hit this on the way through as well as the way back. I snuck in a request for a fresh blueberry pie for next week's return. Hey, they're in season, right? We took advantage of indoor plumbing while their and had a quick shower. Headed back to what must have been a 95 degree cabin. Tomorrow was a big day, and us making it to our potential camping site hinged on us catching the first ferry off Campobello which was at 9 (which really meant 8).







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Old 08-26-2014, 10:01 PM   #2
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beautiful looking country mate. Thanks for sharing
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:41 AM   #3
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Subscribed. Looking forward to following this!

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Old 08-27-2014, 06:21 PM   #4
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Day 3, Saturday: Harrington, ME to Lower Rockport, NB 365 Miles (Thanks to Fundy Rider)
(The two colored lines on the map just represent the 2 tracks I had to make for each day due to the 500 point maximum. I had routes in the Zumo, but I trust my tracks more than routes)



The first big day. Alarm woke us up at 5:30, which wasn't too bad after being spoiled with a mattress to sleep on and a roof over our heads. The sunrise was spectacular.



Apparently we weren't the only one's that thought so, as my cousin Sean put the kayak in for an early morning paddle



Goal was to be on the road by 6:15 to head up the coast to Lubec, and cross the border onto Campobello Island. From there we'd catch the first ferry to Deer Isle, and then another to St. George. We lose an hour as soon as we cross into Canada, so the first 9am ferry is really 8am by our count. We stop in downtown Lubec to make sure we've got our Ids handy. A little quiet...



This really sums up how I feel about most Mainers



Dan Crossing the border



A quick bathroom break at FDR's Summer House (apparently it was their 50th anniversary celebration that day



We made the ferry with time to spare. $7 will get you and your bike to Deer Isle. Once you land you've got a short drive across the island to the next ferry. I couldn't remember if it was advantageous to try to speed across in attempt to make it on the half hour...turns out no. Both ferry's depart on the hour so we had to wait a short while. The ferry from Deer Isle to St. George is a bigger Government ferry that runs at no charge. Dan pointed out that he'd pony up for that one











Once we landed in St. George, we had no trouble hooking up with the Rail Trail that Fundy Rider suggested.





We then hopped on the 780, a nice gravel road that went out through the barrens of New Brunswick. Our next stop was to check out Lepreau Falls







It looks like the road ends there, but in fact it does go through...



From here we slabbed it up to the 100 and then took the Westfield Road to one of the cable ferries that runs across Grand Bay. We rode up the east side of the island and tried to fund my buddies property that he bought on eBay years ago to no avail – I think you're outta luck Jamie - Someone's claimed it.



We continued up the east side on the 845 past Gondola Point and hooked a right up Mt. Misery. Should've known by the name...



We then followed Norton Shore Road to Hampton where we saw what must have been the NBDSC having quite an outing as 30 of them took over the Kredl Corner Market for lunch. Norton Shore Road was a blast



We gassed up in Hampton and I had the worst ice cream snack of my life. We then worked our way over to the Shepody Road. This was actually a blast. It's a wide dirt highway through the wilderness and it's smooth as can be. We crested a hill and came across a swarm of 25 ATVs that were all getting ready to get moving again. We wiggled our way through the mass as most of them were still parked figuring our pace was better than theirs anyway. Sure enough the pack took off after us. I picked up the pace to about 75 and I could still see Dan getting chased by a pack of ATVs and side by sides. I felt like we were in the Baja or Dakar or something of the like. The “race” lasted about 10 minutes before the pack eventually turned off on a different road. Obviously no pics, but here's an idea of the venue



We picked up the 114 and headed east to Hastings Road. Nice views of the bay as we descended into Alma.



Comparing Dan's Nikon p410 and my $40 Canon Powershot a2200n









Our first real good looks at the Bay of Fundy. They claim 40 foot tides but hard to get a grasp on that when the change is over what seems like miles









Leaving Alma, we took the 915 to check out Cape Enrage. Was a really neat road down...quite a bit of tourist traffic and we didn't pay to park and check out the point. The river by the entrance





We stayed on the 915 towards Mary's Point Bird Migration area. Not a lot of action there that day, but what followed was probably my favorite section of the day. I think it was called Shipwreck Park on Shepody Dam Road. Just an amazingly fun road. I really felt like I was on another continent riding through there

















After that killer section, we slabbed it along the 114 with the first real traffic of the trip. We went up and around the river towards Dieppe. We smartened up and stopped in a Sobey's for supplies, as we were winging it for a campsite tonight. As we headed down the main drag, there was a roadblock ahead on my route with some cops directing traffic. I realize he's waving me through and sure enough the road was closed because there was a bike rally. We stopped in and checked it out for a while. Dan and I tried our keisters on a gel buttpad at some lady's demo booth. It felt phenomenal. I've been kicking myself ever since for not picking one up, and neither of us can remember the brand...oh well.



Some random crowd member makin' some smoke



Havin walked around a bit, we caught a second wind. Still more than an hour to go, with a couple possibilities for places to pitch a tent. I was excited for this stretch of gravel along the bay.









Fundy Rider had suggested a camping spot in a farmer's field that overlooked the bay, which would be a great place to see the tides at work. However, there was a wedding about a quarter mile down the road, so the area was probably a little more hopping than normal. Once again, amazed by google street view, I had spied what I thought would be a perfect spot at the end of Lower Rockport Road. There's a monument in a little clearing next to this dead end dirt road. We decided to head down and try that spot.

We arrived there in maybe 20 minutes, and there were no houses or people anywhere around. The spot was great, but then we noticed a little trail off to the left...could we do even better?



We walked down and were so exited for what waited for us.



Eureka! It was the perfect grassy knoll on a bluff overlooking the cove. There was plenty of room for both our tents and we decided we could get our bikes right down there to set up camp. The ground was soft, there was a firepit, and not only did it have wonderful ocean sounds, but there was a babbling brook feeding into the bay just below us. Our senses were overloaded. We hit the jackpot.



We set up camp quickly and gathered some driftwood to get a fire going.









I can't say enough about that night. Perhaps it was the fact that it was the first night in Canada. Or maybe it was because we were winging it and had no certain campsite for the end of a near 14 hour, near 400 mile day. Whatever it was, it was magical. We were knackered, but we couldn't help but stay up and enjoy the surroundings. The skies cleared up, and a full moon was on the rise...













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Old 08-27-2014, 08:30 PM   #5
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Day 4, Sunday. Lower Rockport NB to Panmure, Island PEI. 285 Miles.



Had a wonderful night sleep. Not bad to see this when you first wake up



And even better I see Dan making us some coffee



We got a little bit of a late start, packed up camp and on the road by 9. A little tricky getting out the off camber rooty trail, but nothing we couldn't handle.



We headed out for the hour or so trek to the PEI bridge. We stayed dry last night, but the skies were suspect in front of us. Gonna be a banana suit day.



Sure enough the rain started, and the wind was howling. The ride to the bridge was not all that enjoyable, but hey, we were on our bikes on our way to PEI. How bad could it be?



The ride across the bridge was sketchy at best. It was an amazing piece of engineering, but the low visibility, coupled with the 45 degree angle I had to keep my bike at to go straight, made it hard to take it all in. The confederation bridge is 8 miles long, and it felt all of it that day. Whether you go to PEI by ferry or bridge, it won't cost you a dime. But when it comes time to leave, they get you. It's $25 cheaper to leave the Island by the bridge, but our route just wasn't taking us that way. No need to make a reservation for bikes on the PEI ferry – I was told they can always squeeze bikes on.

Once we crossed onto the Island, there was hope of being able to dodge the rainclouds. However, we soon learned it wasn't as important where than rain was, so much as where it had been. I'd been warned of this. When rain meets the red roads of PEI, it quickly turns to clay...and this clay might as well have been ice. Our skills were going to be tested.







The scenery was unbelievable. The farms were perfectly manicured, and often the crops that were planted appeared to be done strictly for their visual appeal. It's potato country, but in between the rows of green potato leaves were beautiful golden grasses that danced in the breeze. It really was a shame we had to spend most of our time staring at the road in front of us, rather than panning the horizon.







These fields of yellow were unbelievable. The pictures don't do it justice.









We came up a dirt road with a Road Construction sign and two old timers standing next to their trucks off to the left. They were grilling us hard as I guess we were coming in a little hot (maybe only 25 or 30). One of them violently starts making the “slow down” motion. I give him a wave and let off the throttle and about 20 yards later found myself in an “S” type slide cranking the bars left and right. Somehow throttled out of that close call and pulled over down the road. I asked Dan if I'd crested the hill far enough as to be out of sight from the old timers. He assured me that they saw the whole thing. “Damn City Slickers...” (pun intended).

At this point we were happy to hit some pavement and work our way up to the north shore. First we'd have to stop off in Kensington for some Ice Cream, Fish Sandwiches and Poutine. After overindulging, it was time to get back on the horse. I was excited to see the sand dunes as I'd heard the area was beautiful. $3.90 would get you into both provincial parks for the day. Thought that was reasonable.







There was pretty good surf and a couple people were braving the waters



The clay covered bikes invited a lot of conversations. I think we were the only ones dumb enough to be riding off the pavement that day.



Leaving the north shore, we were heading into long sections of those red roads I'd linked together. A few failed to go through, not without us giving a solid effort. They'd start out nice...



and get thicker



and thicker



The bikes had taken on a nice hue. Little did I know it would become permanent!



The roads were not in ideal condition. Some sections were more coarse than others, and held up to the rain fine. Others were complete clay. The plan was to ride another 60 miles of clay before heading to one of those famous lobster suppers in Cardigan. We wanted to have dinner before hitting our campground on Panmure Island which was another 25 miles or so down the road. It was 5:30, so we decided to cut out the eastern loop I had planned . We got to dinner around 6:30. and Dan went for the big 5 course Lobster Dinner (all you can eat chowder, salad, a plate of mussels, a 1 ¼ Lobster, and a desert). I went with the seafood pasta which was good.



Satiated, we hopped back on the bikes and headed towards, well past the campsite. Light was fading quickly and I drove to the end of the island looking for the campsite and found nothing. Turns out Panmure Island provincial island isn't on the island at all. Oh well. We had to set up camp in the dark. The campsite was nothing special, but left us with less than half an hour's ride to the ferry in the morning. We had a private site, but it was close to the road. We did take long hot showers and attempted a fire that dwindled quickly. Turned in by 11. Due to our late start this morning, I set the alarm tonight. We're supposed to be at the 8 am ferry an hour early. No problem.
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:11 AM   #6
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Nice job with the details and pics.
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Old 08-28-2014, 07:01 AM   #7
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Great ride report!

I'm particularly interested in the gravel roads you used to get to Rangely ME, and also those blueberry "barrens" you mention down near the Maine / NB border. It looks like great riding!

Also, please tell me what you're using for the maps you post. They're very nicely done.

Cheers!
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Old 08-28-2014, 10:47 AM   #8
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Nice ride report. I did an 8-day Nova Scotia trip the first week of August. Do you plan to ride the Ceilidh Coastal Trail in Nova Scotia?
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:15 PM   #9
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Great report so far! looking forward to reading the rest of it. the whole NE Canada is on my short list of rides i want to do.

What did you mean by permanent? or are you leading up to that(i'll wait if you are)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdriscollmeir View Post
Day 4, Sunday. Lower Rockport NB to Panmure, Island PEI. 285 Miles.


The bikes had taken on a nice hue. Little did I know it would become permanent!


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Old 08-28-2014, 12:47 PM   #10
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Nice report and pics - thanks for taking us along!
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Old 08-28-2014, 01:12 PM   #11
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Very informative RR, have added several waypoints to my Garmin file already. Any chance of getting your track logs?

Is it my imagination or has the tide risen significantly between those two pics?



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Old 08-28-2014, 03:43 PM   #12
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[QUOTE=DYNOBOB;24952017]Very informative RR, have added several waypoints to my Garmin file already. Any chance of getting your track logs?

Is it my imagination or has the tide risen significantly between those two pics?

Yes the tides come in very quickly.... pretty cool to watch, and in some places around the area, tidal wave raft rides are available.
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:07 PM   #13
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Good stuff, Chris. Funnily enough, I've been to that lobster supper place in Cardigan too.

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Old 08-28-2014, 05:56 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtl_Biker View Post
Great ride report!

I'm particularly interested in the gravel roads you used to get to Rangely ME, and also those blueberry "barrens" you mention down near the Maine / NB border. It looks like great riding!

Also, please tell me what you're using for the maps you post. They're very nicely done.

Cheers!
The maps are done on Gpsvisualizer.com You just upload the track and it creates the map for you - save the image and you're good to go. Search for the Northern New England Adventure Trail here on ADV and there's a whole thread including a link to the GPS file
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DYNOBOB View Post
Very informative RR, have added several waypoints to my Garmin file already. Any chance of getting your track logs?

Is it my imagination or has the tide risen significantly between those two pics?



YES! it has. We originally were trying to figure out how tall that peninsula of rocks were in the distance above my windshield - we figured at least 12 feet, which is the size of the rock in front of my camp in the sunrise pic at the beginning of day three. That does get completely covered at high tide, so I'm no stranger to the big tides. We actually didn't think those tallest rocks on the point would get covered, but not only did they, but it only took about an hour and a half! It came in really quick - That was cool. As I mentioned, it's hard on much of the bay to see the height change of the tides as it goes out gradually for miles. Here was a good place to a drastic height change right in front of you
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