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Old 02-23-2008, 09:35 AM   #1
JimVonBaden OP
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R1150 Spline Lube Pictorial, no specs.

Last weekend my friend Paul and I decided to do a spline lube, actually this has been in preplanning for months. His is a 2002, the most common bike to have spline issues, and he wanted to make sure he was good for another 40K miles at least!

He purchased all the trans seals, a new clutch disc, all the assorted nuts and bolts, a clutch line and slave cylinder, as well as some Ohlins and everything to do a full 30K service. His service schedule is a bit off due to a long trip, so he added a few things.

We had all the parts, a lift, tools, beer and rum, plus two crazy dogs, to get us through the next two days.


Saturday morning at the crack of 10:00, we got started.


Plenty of room around the lift for work, and the bike securely tied down.

My friend Kermit loves to help, so he came by to lend a very useful hand.


We laid out the parts on the table, this is nearly $2000 in parts, with the shocks.


All ready to go!



The easiest part of the job, take off the seat!



First off was the FD. We removed the ABS sensor and caliper so we could remove the wheel.



Then we hung the caliper and sensor on the footpeg after removing all the zip ties so it would go up with the rear frame.


The exhaust came off, as well as the shock to gain some working room. We later removed the Cat as well.


Here we have the FD off, don’t forget to heat the bolt and lock nut to 200° before trying. They have red locktite on them and you will mess up the threads if you don’t.


We checked out the bearings, and at 35K miles, they are in good shape.


After loosening all the bolts on the frame, and removing the two rear, and two front ones, we were ready for the lifting part.


The airbox also has several screws in it, two on the side, one in the airbox rear, and two on the electrical box. We removed those, and loosened the fuse box from it’s mounts. This gave us the room we needed to slightly pry back on the rear edge of the airbox as we lifted up.

There are a lot of little items that need moving, tweaking, and holding as you lift. Just take your time, and do it slowly, moving everything you need, and holding the airbox down.


After some cussing, moving wires, clipping innumerable zip ties, and wrangling, we got the frame up and out of the way. (Caution, make sure you remove all the airbox hold down screws, DAMHIK?








Now we had access to the trans, and then realized we needed the cat removed as well.


The gear position sensor needed to come out, easy enough with a pair of pliers to compress the spring hold down, but…


The damn plug was routed up past the frame, and after an hour of moving the frame up and down, shoving wires around, and two large Pizzas, we finally just took the wires out of the plug to get it out.

We also removed the clutch slave cylinder, and found it and the clutch line to be in perfect condition. We did not disconnect it, just tied it up out of the way.

Then, sorry no pictures we were a little busy, we unbolted the bottom left and top side right trans mount bolts and inserted the guide pins I made.


I made a guide pin from an 80mm bolt with the head cut off, and a slot drilled in it to screw it in, I also beveled the edges to make it slip on easier. (Thanks Bohdan for the sizing).

With them in place, we used a piece of cardboard to hold the trans bolts in the right positions relative to the trans, as we pulled each one.

After we got all the trans bolts out, the trans slipped back, and then stuck.

We had removed the two bolts in the bottom of the battery tray, and were prying up on it to clear, but there were a pair of wires wrapped around it in the left, and they were a serious pain to move out of the way. Stupid assembly process if this is the norm.


You can see the wires here. When we reinstalled it we rerouted the wires, battery wires, so they would not be around the post.

Finally we got the trans out, this was about 3:00.









The trans was never more than a couple feet from the bike. I love this lift, what a difference it makes for this kind of work!

The next few pictures are the splines of the trans and clutch.


Clutch splines had just a bit of rust, and dried lube on them. Definitely needed cleaning and lubing.






We cleaned them with a combination of dental pics, a tooth brush, and some brake cleaner.


As you can see, they are in near perfect condition. This bike does not have an issue with misalignment, or bad splines.






The best lube, IMHO.


Add a nice coating of lube to both clutch and trans splines.

Speaking of the clutch, it had .4mm of wear, for a total of 6.1mm width compared to the new one we had just in case at 6.5mm total width. Looked great for 35K miles, and some rough off road stuff.


Here is a shot of the holder we made for the bolts. Looks like a Punisher Skull (hard to see but it was drawn on)!


The trans went right in, after I reminded Paul how to shift into neutral!





The trans went in easily, and all the parts bolted right up! No issues at all. The tail section dropped down nicely, and all the bolts went in like they are supposed to. Torqued and ready for use.


Then we installed the Ohlins, and put the final drive back on torqued to spec. Add the wheel and caliper, plus the ABS sensor and the rear mud flap.


We took advantage of the tank off to change the fuel filter, it had 23K miles on it.

Next we attacked the front of the bike. It has had a small leak for the last 25K miles on the front engine cover, so we decided to remove it. Man what a PITA that is on the bike with the Telelever in place!




We tool off the belt cover, then unbolted the front cover and oil tube, removed the lower pully and Hall Effect Sensor, yes we marked it first. And this is where the trouble hit. It was now 2:00 on Sunday.

That cover is a VERY VERY, did I say VERY, tight fit, and the alternator is in the way, and the crank pully shaft is in the way, and the oil pipe is in the way. Argh! We had to pull the oil seal off, and then rotate the alternator in place, remove all the alternator bolts, and maneuver it until it was like this:

PITA is an understatement. All for a slight seep.


We finally got it off by removing the front shock and while two of us compressed the suspension all the way, the third pulled it out. DAMN tight.

Lunch break, and to get some RTV.



We got back from lunch, added a bead of RTV, make it a fine bead, you don’t want a lot of extra falling into the engine, around all the surfaces, and each bolt hole, then installed the cover. It went on easy by reversing the process. All except the damn oil tube which had gotten slightly bent when we were messing with the cover trying to remove it. It took half an hour to get the tube bolted back on.



Then we rotated the alternator, and bolted it back into place.


We installed the HES, the pully, and a new belt, and then the belt cover.


Finally done with the cover, after 4 hours!


Installed the front Ohlins, easy as pie, and then did a simple oil change and checked everything for tightness.

Along the way, while we had the wheels off, we installed a Tire Pressure Monitor in each wheel (tires removed and reinstalled, as well as new aluminum angled valve stems, and the TPM unit on the clutch reservoir.


Note the foamy look of the oil, but right at the perfect level.

We reinstalled the tank, and zip tied a crap load of wires, and recheched everything. The bike started on the first turn, ran great, and everything worked.

Not one extra bolt, or major issue. 23hours of work, and the bike and rider went home with zero problems.

List of accomplishments:
Spline lube
Ohlins Install
Tire Pressure Sensor install
Angled Aluminum Valve Stem install
Front seal repair
Fuel Filter install
Alternator Belt install
Crank Shaft Seal install
Oil Change


Paul, and his new/old bike!

Lots of work, made fun by good friends, and several drinks!

Jim

PS Please don't quote the whole post, thanks.
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Old 02-23-2008, 10:00 AM   #2
Medicine Creek
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nice....wanna do mine?
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Old 02-23-2008, 10:07 AM   #3
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as always... thank you sir!
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Old 02-23-2008, 10:39 AM   #4
Bollocks
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Jim,
Nice job mate.
How hard is the fuel filter to do?.
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Old 02-23-2008, 10:50 AM   #5
Hotmamaandme
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Nice Job!

Nice job and very nice shop!

Only thing I would have suggested is.....You had the tank off and changed the fuel filter......Suggestion IMHO Should have done the external fuel filter mount. Makes that fuel filter job a 5-10 job from then on. LINKY to filter relocate http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=239337

You got wrenching skills got to give you the thumbs up on that!

The Ohlins will make that a brand new ride once they are dialed in for him, Worth every penny IMHO.

Great Job! Now it makes me think about my splines and lube.
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Old 02-23-2008, 10:53 AM   #6
kootenay kid
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I love seeing this stuff. What a crazy bike. Thanks, it made for a great read while having my Saturday morning coffee
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Old 02-23-2008, 11:08 AM   #7
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Thank you for posting.
Seams a lot of tech work there... not sure if I will ever try it, but I marked the tread for future reference if I fell brave enough :)
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Old 02-23-2008, 12:32 PM   #8
JimVonBaden OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bollocks
Jim,
Nice job mate.
How hard is the fuel filter to do?.
filter is not hard at all, but as mentioned, and especially if you do a lot of dirt and possibly have access to contaminated fuel, the external mod is a good one.

Paul wasn't too keen on the idea, so we swapped it normally.

Thanks guys! It was fun!

Jim
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Old 02-23-2008, 04:45 PM   #9
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Jim – great write-up! You are a first-class friend for taking on such a largenormous project – and you’ve proven your tech savvy once again. Huge thanks also to Kermit for lending highly valued wrench-smarts and hands (and witty banter!). Two specific reactions. . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden
The trans went right in, after I reminded Paul how to shift into neutral!
Wait, how do I do that again? One down, five up - and neutral is where in all of that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden
the bike and rider went home with zero problems
– well, no bike-related problems at least!! More seriously, I took the bike out again today and she runs like a top (a top that runs like a well-running bike, that is). The new suspension is very cool indeed, and the fact that none of the other work we did influenced the ride is a strong testimonial that we got her put back together 'just so.'

. . . also, a photo of wrenching rock starts Jim and Kermit. . .


That weekend was FUN!
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Old 02-23-2008, 06:43 PM   #10
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Good Job JVB - mine spline service is coming up this summer or fall!


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Old 02-23-2008, 07:41 PM   #11
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Nice write up! Is the spline lube process basically the same for the 1100GS?
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Old 02-23-2008, 08:10 PM   #12
JimVonBaden OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexBiker
Nice write up! Is the spline lube process basically the same for the 1100GS?
Yes, pretty much exactly the same, with minor differences in where the frame bolts up.

Jim

PS Thanks Paul, I really did have a good time!
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Old 02-23-2008, 08:36 PM   #13
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Why RTV instead of Hondabond or Yamabond ect? RTV has a way of working its way into vital engine oil gallys ect. Just curious.

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Old 02-23-2008, 08:41 PM   #14
JimVonBaden OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodakaguy
Why RTV instead of Hondabond or Yamabond ect? RTV has a way of working its way into vital engine oil gallys ect. Just curious.

Hodakaguy
Sunday afternoon, nothing open but Autozone.

We were very careful not to put much on knowing that the surfaces were a mcchine fit. The bead was less than 1/8" think at the widest point, and layed towards the ourside edge. I am confident that most, if not all, squeezeout was on the outside.

Jim
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Old 02-23-2008, 08:55 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden
Sunday afternoon, nothing open but Autozone.


Jim

I know how that goes. Never fails!


Great write up

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