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Old 02-21-2009, 07:08 PM   #121
Jamie Z OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodwill
Glad to see I'm not alone. Though once again I figure it's basically due to our lack of good experience.
It's not so much experience as it is perspective. I'm quite the opposite of you. I know there's not much out in the back country which can hurt you, so when I'm set up somewhere out in the woods or behind a cemetery and I hear noises, I don't worry about them. It's a bird, or squirrel, or deer, or whatever.

If I'm camped in a campground, or in some cheap hotel room, I tend to get a little more nervous when I'm hearing strange noises because then I don't know what it is or who it might be. I'm far more protective of my belongings if I know I'm around other people.

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Old 02-22-2009, 09:22 AM   #122
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A couple other things

You should try out

www. couchsurfing.com

you can find people all over the world that would be happy to allow you to crash in their home for a couple of nights. Usually they are nice open minded fun people that are into hiking and could show you around town. This will save you motel money and on top of that you interact with locals. The exchange part is if someone ever needs you you help them out too.

Another thing.. I just did this this past weekend. I went to help out a group of people from Food not bombs, they give free food on weekends and in exchange you get to eat and even take home. I didnt do it cause of the free food.. but I was a plus
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Old 02-22-2009, 12:15 PM   #123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perkgana
You should try out

www. couchsurfing.com
Yup. Mentioned by name in my article.

Jamie
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:17 PM   #124
MarshallMiller
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Using pasturized eggs will make storing the eggs safer (if your parinoid scramble them). Marinade and cool meat with a ziplock bag, Ice, little water, and whatever you like. Cooking steaks directly on the coals or on flat stones near the fire is simple just blow off the coals and cover the meat if there are floaties (cover with aluminum foil). Aluminum foil does a great job of cooking pretty much anything. Anybody ever cook a salmon on tree bark or something crazy like that?
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:05 PM   #125
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Wink

Sorry if someone already posted this.

How about an aluminum can stove. I posted this on YouTube a few months ago - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bd5XQFjsA9o

very simple to make and inexpensive too - http://www.instructables.com/id/Cool-Little-Miniature-Stove!/

Fuel is pretty inexpensive, there's three things you can do.

1. Go to any auto place and purchase some HEET for like $2
2. Go to any drug store and purchase a bottle of 70% isopropyl alcohol
3. Salt out your Isopro alcohol (look it up) for 90% isopropyl alcohol

I personally like #1 the best. It's simple, cheap and burns very clean (98% isopropyl I think).

I also made this thing even more compact - I used a redbull can instead of a coke can. The only problem with the redbull can is that it take a bit longer to heat your water.

After shooting the video, I realized that my stove isn't all that level...
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Old 04-08-2009, 09:50 PM   #126
nnichols
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshive
Sorry if someone already posted this.

How about an aluminum can stove. I posted this on YouTube a few months ago - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bd5XQFjsA9o

very simple to make and inexpensive too - http://www.instructables.com/id/Cool-Little-Miniature-Stove!/

Fuel is pretty inexpensive, there's three things you can do.

1. Go to any auto place and purchase some HEET for like $2
2. Go to any drug store and purchase a bottle of 70% isopropyl alcohol
3. Salt out your Isopro alcohol (look it up) for 90% isopropyl alcohol

I personally like #1 the best. It's simple, cheap and burns very clean (98% isopropyl I think).

I also made this thing even more compact - I used a redbull can instead of a coke can. The only problem with the redbull can is that it take a bit longer to heat your water.

After shooting the video, I realized that my stove isn't all that level...
There are a bazillion designs on the net for these things and they're fun to make. I made one with my daughter out of a cat food can and it works great.

If you use Heet, make sure you get the yellow bottle stuff (Methanol) instead of the red bottle stuff (Isopropyl).
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Old 04-09-2009, 05:48 AM   #127
Dan Alexander
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I've carried a wide mouth Thermos bottle on trips and they are very handy. When passing through a town with a Wendy's I can stop and fill it up with nice hot chilli. A handfull of soda crackers and a couple of hot sauce and a spoon and off you go. It stays hot for hours till the tent is set up and it's time to relax. Wash it out the next day at a gas station .. no muss no fuss. I'm not up to date on US pricing but up here it's under $1.50
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Old 04-09-2009, 08:50 PM   #128
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Lions, tigers, and bears

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodwill
Aren't you afraid of wild animals? I always felt safer in a regular campground, foolishly thinking the presence of many humans might keep wild animals at bay. I think I am wrong, but I'd be interested in getting your ideas on that.
It's been quite a while, but the only times we've encountered bears were in well established campgrounds. Sometimes they are drawn by poorly secured food left around campsites. Even if you are careful the guy in the next site may not be. Snakes come to campgrounds with water. My father nearly stepped on two rattlesnakes near the showers in a New Mexico campground.
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:05 PM   #129
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Once again I have to thank the imates here for pointing out something a guy already knows but never does.(me at least!) I like the thermos idea. Effortless warm food at the end of a ride. Hmmm.
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Old 04-10-2009, 10:52 AM   #130
Mikey113
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Light weight camping ideas

I have been thinking about lightweight gear for ADV riding / camping off my klx250. Sleeping gear would probably take the most room (sleeping bag/tent combo). Assuming I am summer camping what do you guys think about using a 10 oz hammock

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___40675

I would also use a military issue poncho/poncho liner combo. The liner ties in and it buttons into a "sleeping bag." All of this compresses smaller than my current ultra light sleeping bag. Do you guys think this would be comfortable enough for a summer night around 40-60F? Anyone used a similar idea?
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Old 04-10-2009, 02:47 PM   #131
kshive
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey113
I have been thinking about lightweight gear for ADV riding / camping off my klx250. Sleeping gear would probably take the most room (sleeping bag/tent combo). Assuming I am summer camping what do you guys think about using a 10 oz hammock

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___40675

I would also use a military issue poncho/poncho liner combo. The liner ties in and it buttons into a "sleeping bag." All of this compresses smaller than my current ultra light sleeping bag. Do you guys think this would be comfortable enough for a summer night around 40-60F? Anyone used a similar idea?
I know there are may opinions on outdoor gear and as the saying goes, "There's more than one way to skin a cat." This is just a comment so don't rag on me too much...

There's a LOT of tents out there but most of the brand names (i.e., North Face, Mountain Hardware (which I'm a fan of ), Sierra Designs, etc.) don't really offer the BEST tents out there for ultralightweight rugged travel.

Talk to people that have hiked the Appalachian trail or PCT and they'll tell you to get something called a tarp tent. Here are a few of my fav brands...

http://www.tarptent.com
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/default.asp

Take the SixMoons Lunar Solo for example. One man three season tent with vestibule that you can sit up in and weighs 1.5 pounds (24 oz) plus it's waterproof. Packed size is 15" x 4.5" and packing it does not require an engineering degree.

As for sleeping bag, I have a North Face Cats Meow +20F. Packs well for three seasons and is synthetic so it's not that big of a deal of it gets wet (compared to down where you'll have to find a dryer and a few tennis balls to get the loftness back).

Anyhow, my two cents on that...
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Old 04-12-2009, 01:47 PM   #132
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this applies more to motorcycle camping than anything else but my favorite places to camp cheap are powerlines and radio towers. Radio towers are lifesavers at night--they have a big red blinking light at the top saying 'hey sleep here!' Aim that front tire at the light. A lot of radio towers have signs that say 'Warning: Emitted frequencies known to be harmful to human beings" just pitch the tent a few feet further away

Lipton Noodles is the best food on the trail. Boils over a simple stove in no time, comes in all sortsa varieties and usually only costs a buck a pack. Substitute olive oil for butter, I keep a little squeeze bottle full of it on all backpacking/biking trips. You can get chicken pre-packaged like tuna at the grocery store--chuck it in the noodles and you get more protein.

I'm a coffee ADDICT and instant coffee is NOT coffee--that junk tastes like you brewed it in your socks. I carried a french press that fit in a coffee mug for years and years but it weighed a full pound. Now I carry coffee pods with me on backpacking trips, just pour in water. I have a salt shaker full of non-dairy creamer I bring. Coffee pods are more expensive than normal coffee and I still carry my old Aero french press mug on the bike.

I use a white gas stove in the states but it's hard to beat the afforementioned coke can stove in the 3rd world. I've also used alcohol based hand sanitizer in them and, of course, Golden Grains.
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Old 04-12-2009, 05:18 PM   #133
Jamie Z OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil
this applies more to motorcycle camping than anything else but my favorite places to camp cheap are powerlines and radio towers. Radio towers are lifesavers at night--they have a big red blinking light at the top saying 'hey sleep here!' Aim that front tire at the light.
I've done that a couple of times. Thanks for bringing it up! Towers are almost always located in an out-of-the-way place.

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Old 04-12-2009, 05:57 PM   #134
CruisnGrrl
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I use one of those "stove in a can" that you can pick up from canadian tire (or other hardware/outdoor stores) very compact and fits one of those ready to serve campbells soups perfectly. Also carry a small grill that I can balance on some rocks to either put pans on or cook directly on (ie steak) over fire.

I would like to pick up one of these hammocks http://hennessyhammock.com/ but i'm not sure how one would go about pitching your tent where there are no uprights to lash onto.
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Old 04-23-2009, 01:17 PM   #135
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Kinda old thread, but one of my favorites. Let's keep adding to it.

These things are as good as an otterbox for compact dry storage, but dirt cheap:



They come in all kinds of sizes. I use mine for electronics, papers, etc. that I want to keep 100% dry.

Wal-Mart has 'em, as well as many grocery stores.

On the cooking front, a small container of veggie oil works well for frying things. Jerky packs well, although it's kinda pricey.

I met a german dude riding through BC on the cheap who would just stop at a grocery store and get a loaf of good bread (not sandwich bread, something a little more rugged like a sourdough or Italian) and a pre-cooked sausage. Seemed like a good way to go, I've done it several times since.

I make it a point to eat some jerky, a granola bar, piece of fruit, or similar at every gas stop. This makes it less likely that I'll be starving later and want to purchase a massive meal.

One more way to save money on food: eat less. I'll eat about half of what sounds like the right amount of food proportionate to how hungry I am, then wait 20 minutes. If I'm still hungry after that then I'll eat more, but usually the 20 minute wait lets the food I've already eaten start to digest and I find I no longer want more.
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